All Posts In Food News

Nutrition News: Rethink Kids and Peanuts, a New Sugar Substitute, Organics Under Fire

by in Food News, September 4, 2015

New peanuts practice

You know how parents have been urged to delay giving their kids peanuts, lest they have an allergy? Well, scratch that. New research from the National Institutes of Health indicates that putting off the introduction of peanuts into kids’ diets may increase their chances of developing peanut allergies — and the American Academy of Pediatrics has now issued a statement saying it joins other organizations in encouraging health care providers to recommend that children be given products containing peanuts when they are between 4 and 11 months old, especially if those children have severe eczema or are allergic to eggs. The AAP says this earlier introduction, may reduce peanut allergy rates by as much as 81 percent, Time reports, but the organization cautions that, to prevent choking, infants should be given creamy peanut butter and not graduate to whole peanuts until around age 4. Read more

Nutrition News: Nutrition Labels, GMO-Free Products and Organic Recalls

by in Food News, August 28, 2015

Nutrition Labels Prompt Buying

If a product has a front-of-pack nutrition label, people are significantly more likely to buy it, regardless of whether the label brings good news or bad about the nutritional value of the product, a study has found. According to researchers at the University of Otago, in New Zealand, who published their findings in Public Health Nutrition, it doesn’t matter the size or format of the label, or even the info contained in the front-of-pack label; the mere presence of a front-of-pack label on a product causes an increase in consumers’ intention to buy the product. The authors say the results suggest a “complete functional failure” of current nutrition labels, calling for further research before countries make them compulsory, as is being considered in the United States and the United Kingdom, among others. Read more

Nutrition News: Cut Carbs, Cut Fat or Just Exercise? Plus: Raise a Healthy Eater

by in Food News, August 21, 2015

Cutting Carbs Not So Key

Attention, carb cutters: A new study has found that, contrary to the belief of die-hard Atkins fans, it is not necessary to cut carbs to burn fat and lose weight. According to researchers at National Institutes of Health, who published their findings in the journal Cell Metabolism, those who cut an equal caloric amount of fat from their diet are just as, if not more, likely to burn fat as those who cut carbs. “Our study suggests it’s probably the calories in a diet that matter much more than the carbohydrates or the fat,” lead author Kevin Hall, of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, told the Los Angeles Times. The key to losing weight is to reduce calories and keep them down over the long-term, Hall said.

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Find Out What Foods These Celebs Have in Their Fridges

by in Food News, August 15, 2015

Many celebrities have kicking bodies, but what do they like to eat on a daily basis? Here’s a peek into the kitchens of six celebrities — see the healthy food they like to stock up on. Read more

Nutrition News: New Soda Health Claims, Benefits of Spicy Food and School Gardens

by in Food News, August 14, 2015

Now in Soda News

There’s lots of news bubbling in Soda Land. PepsiCo has begun shipping its new version of Diet Pepsi, tweaked to eliminate the artificial sweetener aspartame and replace it with two other artificial sweeteners: sucralose and acesulfame potassium (aka Splenda and Ace-K). The company, which is doing a big marketing push behind the reformulation, says it is responding to consumer demand, but it remains to be seen whether the switch from one artificial sweetener to two others will go down easy, particularly with Diet Pepsi stalwarts. Meanwhile, Coca-Cola has not changed Diet Coke, which contains aspartame, but it is engaged in its own efforts to fight sinking soda sales amidst health concerns: Through a new nonprofit organization, the Global Energy Balance Network, Coke is funding scientists who contend that America’s obesity problem is not about how much (or what) Americans eat and drink, but rather about how much we exercise, despite ample evidence to the contrary, The New York Times reports. Read more

Nutrition News: The Truth About Pretzels, Mindless Diet Busters and Activated Charcoal Is a Trend

by in Food News, August 7, 2015

Take a Pass on Pretzels

Pretzels may be better than some fatty chips, but four out of five nutrition experts surveyed by Time say if you’re trying to eat healthy, pretzels shouldn’t be your go-to snack. Although pretzels are low-fat, they are also pretty paltry on the protein and fiber front, and they can be quite high in sodium and carbs. What’s more, they rank high on the glycemic index, meaning they can quickly spike blood sugar levels. “Pretzels are a snack food made from enriched flour, which provides very little fiber and overall very little nutritional benefit,” registered dietitian Kate Patton told the magazine. Patton recommends that those in search of a healthier alternative choose nuts, seeds, roasted edamame or popcorn. Read more

Celebs’ Favorite Healthy Foods

by in Food News, August 3, 2015

What healthy foods are the stars noshing on these days? Here’s an inside look at what’s hot in celebrity kitchens. Read more

Nutrition News: Chipotle Unseats Subway, FDA Added-Sugar Label Rules and Soybean Oil Health Effects

by in Food News, July 31, 2015

So Long, Subway. Hola, Chipotle!

Subway’s stint as America’s favorite “healthy” fast-food spot has reached its end. The sandwich chain has been bested by Chipotle, where sales have grown more than 20 percent this year. Meanwhile, sales at Subway — whose (now former) spokesman Jared Fogle has recently been embroiled in a scandal that is beyond distasteful — have sunk by 3 percent. While some experts have scoffed at Chipotle, whose tasty offerings are hardly low-cal, being labeled a “healthy” choice, the burrito chain has staked its claim to the title by using fresh, high-quality ingredients, maintaining high standards in its supply chain, preparing its food on the spot and in view of customers, and consistently publicizing its efforts to improve its product. Recently Chipotle announced it would no longer use GMO ingredients. Subway, on the other hand, struggled to overcome criticism that it used a chemical used in yoga mats and shoe rubber in its bread, though it subsequently discontinued the chemical’s use. Chipotle’s rise and Subway’s decline may also indicate changing attitudes about what constitutes “healthy”: “Millennials care less about calories and more about where their food comes from,” Darren Tristano, of the food industry research firm Technomic, told Business Insider. Read more

Nutrition News: Super-Healthy Olives, Cartoon-Character Cookie Effect, Local Eating Is In

by in Food News, July 24, 2015

Feel Good About Olives

Are olives a food you can feel good about eating? A panel of nutritionists and diet experts polled by Time magazine all say olives make a very healthy snack indeed. They point out that about four large olives have only about 20 calories, are nutritionally rich and contain about two grams of healthy monounsaturated fat, which benefits your heart, your brain and your belly. What’s more, olives are packed with antioxidants like biophenols, which keep bad cholesterol from building up in your artery walls. They’re also anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial, and aid in disease prevention. Plus, as a fermented food, they offer gut-friendly bacteria. One drawback: Because they are cured, olives may be high in salt, so the experts suggest you compensate by cutting out another salty snack. A small price to pay … Read more

Nutrition News: Time to Freeze Fish, Fruit and Veggie Fail, Calorie-Count Label Delay

by in Food News, July 17, 2015

Fresh Frozen Fish

Sushi and ceviche lovers, take note: Fish served raw or undercooked in New York City restaurants will soon be required to cool its fins for a bit in the freezer before it hits your plate — anywhere from 15 hours to a week, minimum, depending on the temperature and freezing process. The city’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has issued the directive, set to take effect in August, in keeping with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations, which aim to rid fish of parasites and bacteria. According to The New York Times, however, many NYC chefs already flash-freeze their fish in order to rid it of potential pathogens, and say it does not affect taste. Read more

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