All Posts In Food News

Nutrition News: The Full-Fat Trend, Healthy Office Snacks, Coke Spending

by in Food News, October 2, 2015

Is full-fat on trend?

For years, we’ve all been urged to curtail our consumption of saturated fat, advice that affected our appetite for butter, meat and whole milk — or at least the amount of those foods we ate. But, a new report published by the Credit Suisse Research Institute has determined, Americans are rebelling against the old guidance, which has grown murkier, and eating more full-fat foods. Butter sales rose 14 percent in 2014 and an additional 6 percent in the first three months of 2015, while sales of whole milk climbed 11 percent and skim milk purchases plummeted 14 percent in the first six months of 2015. The authors suggest the trend may be part of larger shift toward natural – organic, unprocessed – foods. “Full-fat milk sounds a lot more natural to people than 2 percent or skim milk,” lead author Stefano Natella told The New York Times. “Cows don’t produce skim milk. You have to process it to take out the fat.” Read more

Nutrition News: Fast-Food Kids, Vegetable Supply, Plate Size Matters

by in Food News, September 25, 2015

Frightening fast-food facts
If you think America has been easing off its love affair with fast food, a new CDC report offers bracing news: On any given day, according to the study, more than one-third (34.3 percent) of all U.S. kids and teens (ages 2 to 19) scarf down some kind of fast food — a number that has remained relatively stable over the past 15 years, despite our cultural push for more healthful eating. And while almost 12 percent of kids and teens got fewer than 25 percent of their daily calories from fast food, nearly 11 percent of them got between 25 and 40 percent of those calories from it — and 12 percent of them gobbled up more than 40 percent of their daily calories from places that traffic largely (though of course not exclusively) in burgers, fries, sodas and the like. Gulp. Read more

Nutrition News: Exotic New Superfoods, Food Safety Measures, NYC Salt Rules

by in Food News, September 18, 2015

The search for the next big superfood

Now that chain-store consumers are devouring acai, quinoa and chia seeds en masse, seekers of edgy new superfoods are scouring the world for the next big thing, something packed with antioxidants, vitamins and minerals … and coated with the allure of the exotic. Warning that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables is probably sufficient for health and energy and that unusual foods can be unpredictable and even possibly harmful (for one thing, they may interact unfavorably with medicines), the Los Angeles Times lists a few superfoods gaining favor: Will moringa, E3 live blue-green algae, citicoline, freekeh, turkey tail mushroom or Sideritis be the next kale — or just a big fail? Time and tastes will tell.

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These Celebrities Have Some Seriously Healthy Food Riders

by in Food News, September 18, 2015

Many well-known celebs spend long stretches of time on the road, which can leave them searching for some of the comforts of home. Find out what healthy foods your favorite stars have asked for while traveling the world. Read more

Nutrition News: Nutritionists’ Breakfasts, Vitamin C Benefits, McDonald’s Cage-Free Eggs  

by in Food News, September 11, 2015

Nutritionist breakfast recommendations

What do nutrition experts eat for breakfast? Because September is “breakfast month” — who knew? — Business Insider asked 38 of them what they liked to eat for the meal that is widely regarded as the day’s most important, and why. Their picks include a lot of old standbys, such as eggs, oatmeal, Greek yogurt, whole grains, nuts and fruit, but they also include some eye-opening items, like sweet potatoes, organic tofu and pumpkin seeds. Feast your eyes on their suggestions — and then just feast. Read more

Nutrition News: Rethink Kids and Peanuts, a New Sugar Substitute, Organics Under Fire

by in Food News, September 4, 2015

New peanuts practice

You know how parents have been urged to delay giving their kids peanuts, lest they have an allergy? Well, scratch that. New research from the National Institutes of Health indicates that putting off the introduction of peanuts into kids’ diets may increase their chances of developing peanut allergies — and the American Academy of Pediatrics has now issued a statement saying it joins other organizations in encouraging health care providers to recommend that children be given products containing peanuts when they are between 4 and 11 months old, especially if those children have severe eczema or are allergic to eggs. The AAP says this earlier introduction, may reduce peanut allergy rates by as much as 81 percent, Time reports, but the organization cautions that, to prevent choking, infants should be given creamy peanut butter and not graduate to whole peanuts until around age 4. Read more

Nutrition News: Nutrition Labels, GMO-Free Products and Organic Recalls

by in Food News, August 28, 2015

Nutrition Labels Prompt Buying

If a product has a front-of-pack nutrition label, people are significantly more likely to buy it, regardless of whether the label brings good news or bad about the nutritional value of the product, a study has found. According to researchers at the University of Otago, in New Zealand, who published their findings in Public Health Nutrition, it doesn’t matter the size or format of the label, or even the info contained in the front-of-pack label; the mere presence of a front-of-pack label on a product causes an increase in consumers’ intention to buy the product. The authors say the results suggest a “complete functional failure” of current nutrition labels, calling for further research before countries make them compulsory, as is being considered in the United States and the United Kingdom, among others. Read more

Nutrition News: Cut Carbs, Cut Fat or Just Exercise? Plus: Raise a Healthy Eater

by in Food News, August 21, 2015

Cutting Carbs Not So Key

Attention, carb cutters: A new study has found that, contrary to the belief of die-hard Atkins fans, it is not necessary to cut carbs to burn fat and lose weight. According to researchers at National Institutes of Health, who published their findings in the journal Cell Metabolism, those who cut an equal caloric amount of fat from their diet are just as, if not more, likely to burn fat as those who cut carbs. “Our study suggests it’s probably the calories in a diet that matter much more than the carbohydrates or the fat,” lead author Kevin Hall, of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, told the Los Angeles Times. The key to losing weight is to reduce calories and keep them down over the long-term, Hall said.

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Find Out What Foods These Celebs Have in Their Fridges

by in Food News, August 15, 2015

Many celebrities have kicking bodies, but what do they like to eat on a daily basis? Here’s a peek into the kitchens of six celebrities — see the healthy food they like to stock up on. Read more

Nutrition News: New Soda Health Claims, Benefits of Spicy Food and School Gardens

by in Food News, August 14, 2015

Now in Soda News

There’s lots of news bubbling in Soda Land. PepsiCo has begun shipping its new version of Diet Pepsi, tweaked to eliminate the artificial sweetener aspartame and replace it with two other artificial sweeteners: sucralose and acesulfame potassium (aka Splenda and Ace-K). The company, which is doing a big marketing push behind the reformulation, says it is responding to consumer demand, but it remains to be seen whether the switch from one artificial sweetener to two others will go down easy, particularly with Diet Pepsi stalwarts. Meanwhile, Coca-Cola has not changed Diet Coke, which contains aspartame, but it is engaged in its own efforts to fight sinking soda sales amidst health concerns: Through a new nonprofit organization, the Global Energy Balance Network, Coke is funding scientists who contend that America’s obesity problem is not about how much (or what) Americans eat and drink, but rather about how much we exercise, despite ample evidence to the contrary, The New York Times reports. Read more