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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, December 12, 2014

Vitamin D
In this week’s news: Study links living thinner with living longer; farmed salmon may be losing its Omega-3 bragging rights; and vitamin D is vital for body and mind.

Shed Pounds, Gain Years?

Put down the sugar cookie. Stop gnawing on the gingerbread house. Go easy on the holiday ham. Obesity can take as much as eight years off your life expectancy, a new study led by researchers at McGill University in Canada has found. What’s more, excess weight also increases the risk for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease at a younger age, potentially reducing healthy years of life by almost two decades. “The pattern is clear — the more an individual weighs and the younger their age, the greater the effect on their health,” lead author Dr. Steven Grover, a clinical epidemiologist and professor of medicine at McGill, concluded. “In terms of life expectancy, we feel being overweight is as bad as cigarette smoking.”

Farmed Salmon’s Omega-3 Slide

We all know salmon is a wonderful source of Omega-3 fatty acids and lower in mercury than many other fish in the sea. But while farmed salmon has been hailed for being especially high in Omega-3s, those levels are declining. Due to eco-efforts to reduce the amount of forage fish such as anchovy, sardines and menhaden (all high in Omega-3s) in salmons’ feed, Civil Eats reports, “A piece of farmed salmon today may contain as little as half the amount of Omega-3s than it did a decade ago.” However, the site notes, “Even if today’s farmed salmon carries far less Omega-3 fatty acids than it once did, it’s now on par with wild salmon, and still packs more than species like tilapia, lobster and catfish.” So, you know, there’s that.

A Very Important Vitamin

Here are two more reasons to make sure you get enough vitamin D. A British study suggests vitamin D supplements may reduce chronic obstructive pulmonary disease lung disease (e.g., bronchitis, emphysema) flare-ups by more than 40 percent in patients deficient in vitamin D. The supplement was also found to reduce the severity and duration of flare-ups in all COPD patients, even those who did not already have a vitamin D deficiency. Another study, conducted by researchers at University of Georgia, University of Pittsburgh and Queensland University of Technology in Australia, has linked vitamin D deficiency with seasonal affective disorder, perhaps due to its involvement in the synthesis of serotonin and dopamine in the brain. “Vitamin D could have a regulative role in the development of SAD,” co-author Alan Stewart said. Fellow author Michael Kimlin noted that “there are strong indications that maintaining adequate levels of vitamin D are … important for good mental health.”

Amy Reiter also contributes to FN Dish.

This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, December 5, 2014


In this week’s news: You now have another reason to scarf down your yogurt; breakfast’s importance is called into question; and heavy drinking may be especially risky for women.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, November 26, 2014


In this week’s news: Study casts shadow on claims that blueberries improve night vision; researchers provide an unforgettable reason to avoid trans fats; and a whole heap of new whole grains to try.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, November 21, 2014

Flax Seeds
In this week’s news: Scientists get the skinny on coffee and obesity; nutritionists root for plant-based omega-3; and why kids shouldn’t heart energy drinks (or even drink them).

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Up, Up and Away! Pack These Nutrition Tips Next Time You Fly

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, Healthy Tips, November 19, 2014


Whether you’re traveling home for the holidays, getting away on vacation, or are a frequent flyer, air travel presents a common challenge to healthy eating. Understanding the unique needs of your body in flight, along with a little bit of planning, can go a long way in getting you to your destination energized, not exhausted.

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Mediterranean Diet Health Benefits May Last Longer Than You Think

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, November 18, 2014

Mediterranean DietIt seems like every time we turn around, we hear about a new way the Mediterranean diet is good for us. Filling up on fruits, vegetables and whole grains, eating a moderate amount of fish and dairy and just a small amount of meat, sweets and unhealthy fats, and incorporating olive oil and the occasional glass of red wine is a recipe for reducing the risk of heart disease, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases, and death due to heart disease or cancer. In the past few months alone, studies have concluded that the Mediterranean diet may lower the risk for chronic kidney disease, diabetes and peripheral artery disease and can help reverse metabolic syndrome. And that’s just a small sampling of the research fast piling up in the diet’s favor.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, November 14, 2014

School Lunch
In this week’s news: Parents get schooled about the healthfulness of home versus school lunches; weight-loss study tips the scales in favor of vegan diet; and researchers suggest attempts to reset metabolism are likely futile.

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Protein: Are We Going Too Far?

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, November 9, 2014

Protein
On my recent visit to the annual Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Food & Nutrition Conference and Expo (the “Super Bowl of nutrition,” as it’s referred to by nutritionists), health care pros from around the country came together to talk about the hottest topics in nutrition. This year the conference was buzzing about one particular nutrient: protein. Here’s what all the fuss was about.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, November 7, 2014

Red Wine
In this week’s news: There may be one fewer reason to drink red wine; meat companies ditch the drugs; and two studies take a glass-half-empty attitude toward milk drinking.

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