All Posts In Chefs and Restaurants

The Chef’s Take: John Fraser’s Grilled Squash Salad with Falafel Croutons

by in Chefs and Restaurants, September 24, 2014

Narcissa Summer Squash SaladAt Narcissa, André Balazs’ and Michelin-starred chef John Fraser’s buzz-worthy restaurant in The Standard Hotel in the East Village, ingredients are sourced from Balazs’ Hudson Valley Farm, and seasonality shines on the menu. The result: food that’s almost as beautiful as the people eating it.

Fraser, who just launched lunch in at Narcissa last week, explains that he tried to create a menu that would appeal to all kinds of appetites. “Some people indulge and want to eat and drink way too much, and others don’t want to feel like they are going to spend the afternoon in a food coma,” he said. “As I have gotten older, I have recognized that the way I eat dictates how I feel. I think about that when I create my menus.”

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The Chef’s Take: Lentil, Avocado and Kale Salad from Franklin Becker

by in Chefs and Restaurants, September 17, 2014

lentil salad
In 1997, Franklin Becker was a 27-year-old chef whose star was on the rise. That same year, he was also diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes. The disease not only changed the way he ate, but it also changed the way he cooked. Becker, who was most recently the corporate chef of the EMM Group, overseeing menus for New York City restaurants Abe & Arthurs, CATCH and Lexington Brass, learned to use simple ingredients, to cook with more vegetables and to add flavor to food by using good fats such as olive oil, nuts and avocados.”I realized that if certain ingredients were bad for me to eat, they were probably not great for my guests to eat either,” Becker says.

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The Chef’s Take: Roasted Root Vegetable Breakfast from Zoe Nathan

by in Chefs and Restaurants, September 10, 2014

roasted root vegetables with egg
Many people who crowd into chef Zoe Nathan’s Huckleberry Café in Santa Monica come for her phenomenal morning pastries and baked goods, including the likes of chocolate-almond muffins, blueberry scones and lemon-kumquat teacake. But Nathan — who is a veteran of San Francisco’s cult favorite bakery, Tartine – was actually trained as a chef, not a baker, and cooked at restaurants like bld in Los Angeles and Lupa in New York City before convincing her now-husband and business partner Josh Loeb to hire her as a pastry chef at his restaurant Rustic Canyon. “I had never done desserts before,” she recalls. “At Tartine, I had done breakfast breads and lots of savories, so I kind of lied and told him I had pastry chef experience, and then when I got the job, I had to go to my parent’s house to teach myself how to bake!”

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The Chef’s Take: Grains and Egg Bowl from Camille Becerra

by in Chefs and Restaurants, September 3, 2014

grains and egg bowl
Here’s something you may not know about Camille Becerra, chef at the stylish New American seafood restaurant, Navy, in New York City’s SoHo. Becerra studied macrobiotic cooking, prepared meals to heal cancer patients in Philadelphia and lived at a Zen monastery in New Mexico where she cooked vegetarian meals for the monks, sourcing ingredients from the on-premises garden. “Through macrobiotic cooking, I saw the importance of food as a source of health,” she says. “I am always very interested in how food can heal and prevent illness.”

At Navy, Becerra offers a menu that caters to locavore hipsters, with seasonal plates like black bass crudo with rhubarb and pine nuts, tilefish with tomato, avocado and almonds, and soft-shell crab with squash-blossom pancakes. But she’s also partial to her macrobiotic roots. For the lunch menu, Becerra added this bowl of grains and eggs with an eye toward offering guests a midday meal that would energize. “During the day, you don’t want something super-rich that will potentially slow you down,” she says. “For the lunch menu, I focused on lighter dishes with lots of vegetables and superfoods.”

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The 10 Best Comeback Foods (and the Chefs Who Love Them)

by in Chefs and Restaurants, Trends, August 28, 2014

brussels sprout
They used to be the stuff that fueled childhood nightmares: forkfuls of overcooked broccoli or endless orbs of bitter Brussels sprouts that had to be endured in order to tackle, finally, the chocolate ice cream. But today’s renditions of green vegetables don’t require nose-holding or the camouflage of cheese in order to win over legions of fans. From the once-maligned spinach that only Popeye fancied to the leafy kale that went on to wildly successful oversaturation, here’s a passel of formerly shunned vegetables (and a few equally undesirable fruits) that chefs have helped give miraculous makeovers. Read more

The Chef’s Take: Grilled Sirloin Tips with Avocado from Tony Maws

by in Chefs and Restaurants, August 27, 2014

grilled sirloin with avocado
It’s 5:30 a.m., and chef Tony Maws is running. Actually, he’s not just running. He’s sprinting up and down the stairs at Harvard Stadium. And he’s not alone. He’s one of 300 this morning, all part of The November Project, a free fitness movement that was originally born in Boston as a way to stay in shape during cold New England months. Now present in multiple cities in across four time zones in North America, the movement motivates and encourages people of all ages, shapes, sizes and fitness levels to get out of their beds and get moving. And Maws is moving.

At 44, he has a six-year-old son and two of the Boston area’s most popular restaurants, one fine dining, Craigie on Main, and one casual, The Kirkland Tap & Trotter. Known for his rustic farm-to-table style, Maws continually earns recognition as one of the country’s best chefs.

At Kirkland Tap & Trotter, local ingredients are the foundation of a menu that’s mostly cooked on a wood-fired grill, the centerpiece of the restaurant. While Maws knows that most of his guests come to toss back pints of craft beer and get their hands on his slow-roasted pork belly and beer-battered ocean perch, he also understands that Kirkland is a place regulars come to several times a week. “I want this to be a place you can eat at regularly, so there have to be dishes that are not all heavy,” Maws says. To that end, he offers a grilled dayboat swordfish, a Persian-spiced vegetable stew and his killer grilled brochette, a steak skewer perfect for summertime grilling. “It’s simple, but we’re not looking for innovation, we’re looking food delicious. And it’s delicious.” Read more

The Chef’s Take: Green Olive Tapenade from David Lebovitz

by in Chefs and Restaurants, August 20, 2014

olive tapenade
“When you cook at home, you know exactly what is going into the food you’re eating,” says David Lebovitz, who has been cooking and baking for most of his life — much of it in restaurants. He spent nearly thirteen years at Chez Panisse, working with Alice Waters and pastry chef Lindsey Shere, who became his mentor. He left the famed Berkeley restaurant in 1999 to coincide with the release of his first book, Room for Dessert. And five years later, he moved to Paris with little more than a cast-iron skillet and one French phrase: pain au chocolat.

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The Chef’s Take: Chickpea Crepes from Ryan Angulo

by in Chefs and Restaurants, August 13, 2014

socca
When Doug Crowell opened Buttermilk Channel in Brooklyn in 2008, the crowds were lured by chef Ryan Angulo’s hearty Americana fare: buttermilk fried chicken and cheddar waffles with savoy cabbage slaw, duck meatloaf with corn pudding and blackberry gastrique and St. Louis ribs with new potato salad and mustard glaze.

But Crowell and his chef knew their audience included almost as many vegivores as carnivores. Instead of cobbling together an array of vegetable sides to satisfy these guests, they created a separate vegetarian menu that included a house-made mushroom-barley burger, a warm mozzarella and romaine salad with a soft poached egg and roasted cauliflower, grilled flatbread with snap peas and ricotta, and locally made Caputo’s linguine with summer squash, tomatoes and basil. “There is such demand here for vegetarian dishes and recipes that are just a little lighter,” Angulo says. “So many people are eating that way. They don’t want steak frites every night. We wanted to give them a menu that included as much variety and thoughtfulness as the regular menu.”

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The Chef’s Take: Chilled Strawberry and Date Oatmeal from Josh Feathers

by in Chefs and Restaurants, August 6, 2014

strawberry oatmeal

“Nutrition was always something I was interested in,” says Josh Feathers, corporate chef at Blackberry Farm, the acclaimed Tennessee hotel and restaurant in the foothills of the Smoky Mountains. A veteran of the Navy, where he was an admiral’s cook for seven years, Feathers was in fantastic shape when he joined Blackberry Farm in 2000. But as time went by, things changed. “I spent more and more time than ever in the kitchen and middle age started creeping up on me,” he recalls. “I looked at myself and said, ‘’Wow, I need to lose about 30 pounds.’” By focusing on portion control and adding a regimen of running and weigh- training at the gym, Feathers shed the weight in six months.

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Chef Dan Barber on Why “Whole-Farm Eating” Is the New “Farm-to-Table”

by in Chefs and Restaurants, June 14, 2014

the third plate
You may not be eating a lot of mustard greens, kidney beans and millet these days, but if Dan Barber has his way, you will be very soon.

Barber is the award-winning chef of Blue Hill, an elegant respite for sustainable cuisine in New York City’s West Village, and Blue Hill Stone Barns, a locavore’s paradise located within the nonprofit farm Stone Barns Center for Food & Agriculture in Tarrytown, NY. Since his early days as a cook, he’s been a pioneering advocate for the farm-to-table movement. But in his revolutionary new book, The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food, Barber reexamines the farm-to-table movement, and comes away from it a new man, one championing the whole farm, not just what’s most prized for the table.

“For all its successes, farm-to-table has not, in any fundamental way, reworked the economic and political forces that dictate how our food is grown and raised,” wrote Barber in a recent Op-Ed in the New York Times. “Big Food is getting bigger, not smaller. In the last five years, we’ve lost nearly 100,000 farms (mostly midsize ones). Today, 1.1 percent of farms in the United States account for nearly 45 percent of farm revenues.”

His solution? Eat more cowpea. Seriously. Instead of cherry-picking crops like tomatoes, strawberries, asparagus and other blockbusters that deplete soil of their most crucial nutrients, Barber proposes we start supporting more humble offerings like buckwheat, cowpea, barley, and mustard greens — which are often used by farmers to enrich the soil in rotation with those A-list vegetables.

The “first plate,” argues Barber, was a classic meal centered on meat with a few vegetables. That gave way to the “second plate,” a new ideal of organic grass-fed meats and local vegetables. Now, he proposes a “third plate”— a new way of eating that’s rooted in cooking with and celebrating the whole farm: vegetables, grains and a smidge of protein. It’s a juicy new holistic approach to food and farming that’s bound to put Barber in the company of legendary food policy gurus like Alice Waters, Michael Pollan and Eric Schlosser.

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