All Posts In Chefs and Restaurants

The Chef’s Take: Yotam Ottolenghi’s Honey-Roasted Carrots with Tahini

by in Chefs and Restaurants, Cookbooks, October 22, 2014

Plenty More
If you’ve cooked from Plenty, Israeli chef and London restaurateur Yotam Ottolenghi’s bestselling and award-winning cookbook, it’s probably dog-eared and food-stained from loving overuse. (Baked eggs with yogurt and greens, Brussels sprouts with tofu, and soba noodles with eggplant and mango, are personal faves.)

Now comes the hotly anticipated follow-up, Plenty More, in which Ottolenghi unapologetically celebrates the wonderful world of vegetables one cooking method at a time — braising, steaming, roasting, char-grilling and frying. In keeping with his signature inventive and vibrant style, Ottolenghi’s recipes in Plenty More feature rather exotic pops of flavor — yuzu in a dish of candy beets with lentils, sorrel and mustard in a bowl of fresh sweet peas, sweet labneh on a plate of warm baked rhubarb, and tahini on a sweet mess of honey-roasted carrots, featured below.

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The Chef’s Take: George Mendes’ Portuguese Chicken Soup

by in Chefs and Restaurants, Cookbooks, October 15, 2014

My Portugal Cookbook Cover
George Mendes, the chef of the restaurant Aldea, grew up feasting on his mother’s elaborate Portuguese meals. While he went on to cook for culinary icons such as David Bouley, Roger Verge, Alain Ducasse, and Martin Berasategui, he has always remained true to his culinary roots in Portugal. In 2009, he opened Aldea (the Portuguese word for village), as a culmination of his Iberian experiences and Portuguese heritage. There’s sea urchin toast with cauliflower puree, shiso and lime, a cucumber and wild strawberry salad with smoked sardines, fresh dill, and yogurt, and sea-salted cod with fennel puree and charred corn.
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Juice Across America: Nine Fresh Juices Worth a Detour

by in Chefs and Restaurants, October 11, 2014

Moon Juice
These days you can’t travel more than a few miles without running into a juice bar. They’re even popping up at airports across America. But not all juices are created equal. Food Network squeezes out the competition with the nation’s freshest ingenious health-boosting concoctions.
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The Chef’s Take: Vegetarian Spring Rolls from Charles Phan

by in Chefs and Restaurants, October 8, 2014

Veg Spring Rolls
In 1995, Charles Phan opened The Slanted Door in San Francisco’s Mission District and introduced the dining public to the relatively unexplored cuisine of his native Vietnam. The restaurant became an overnight sensation. Since then, Phan has moved his restaurant to the historic Ferry Building, earned a James Beard Foundation Best Chef of California Award, and been inducted to the James Beard Foundation’s list of “Who’s Who of Food in America.” Read more

The Chef’s Take: Kabocha Squash Soup from The Fat Radish

by in Chefs and Restaurants, Cookbooks, October 1, 2014

Fat Radish CookbookThe Fat Radish, which opened in 2010, is one of those perfect New York City restaurants. The uncomplicated, slightly British, vegetable-focused menu traces the seasons with local as its mantra. The design is that effortless combination of reclaimed barnyard and weathered industrial chic. The atmosphere is friendly and welcoming. And the folks in the seats all look as though they might have just walked off the set of Girls. All the pieces come together courtesy of owners Ben Towill and Phil Winser, self-taught cooks who are passionate about good ingredients, great design, and feeding guests well.

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The Chef’s Take: John Fraser’s Grilled Squash Salad with Falafel Croutons

by in Chefs and Restaurants, September 24, 2014

Narcissa Summer Squash SaladAt Narcissa, André Balazs’ and Michelin-starred chef John Fraser’s buzz-worthy restaurant in The Standard Hotel in the East Village, ingredients are sourced from Balazs’ Hudson Valley Farm, and seasonality shines on the menu. The result: food that’s almost as beautiful as the people eating it.

Fraser, who just launched lunch in at Narcissa last week, explains that he tried to create a menu that would appeal to all kinds of appetites. “Some people indulge and want to eat and drink way too much, and others don’t want to feel like they are going to spend the afternoon in a food coma,” he said. “As I have gotten older, I have recognized that the way I eat dictates how I feel. I think about that when I create my menus.”

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The Chef’s Take: Lentil, Avocado and Kale Salad from Franklin Becker

by in Chefs and Restaurants, September 17, 2014

lentil salad
In 1997, Franklin Becker was a 27-year-old chef whose star was on the rise. That same year, he was also diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes. The disease not only changed the way he ate, but it also changed the way he cooked. Becker, who was most recently the corporate chef of the EMM Group, overseeing menus for New York City restaurants Abe & Arthurs, CATCH and Lexington Brass, learned to use simple ingredients, to cook with more vegetables and to add flavor to food by using good fats such as olive oil, nuts and avocados.”I realized that if certain ingredients were bad for me to eat, they were probably not great for my guests to eat either,” Becker says.

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The Chef’s Take: Roasted Root Vegetable Breakfast from Zoe Nathan

by in Chefs and Restaurants, September 10, 2014

roasted root vegetables with egg
Many people who crowd into chef Zoe Nathan’s Huckleberry Café in Santa Monica come for her phenomenal morning pastries and baked goods, including the likes of chocolate-almond muffins, blueberry scones and lemon-kumquat teacake. But Nathan — who is a veteran of San Francisco’s cult favorite bakery, Tartine — was actually trained as a chef, not a baker, and cooked at restaurants like bld in Los Angeles and Lupa in New York City before convincing her now-husband and business partner Josh Loeb to hire her as a pastry chef at his restaurant Rustic Canyon. “I had never done desserts before,” she recalls. “At Tartine, I had done breakfast breads and lots of savories, so I kind of lied and told him I had pastry chef experience, and then when I got the job, I had to go to my parent’s house to teach myself how to bake!”

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The Chef’s Take: Grains and Egg Bowl from Camille Becerra

by in Chefs and Restaurants, September 3, 2014

grains and egg bowl
Here’s something you may not know about Camille Becerra, chef at the stylish New American seafood restaurant, Navy, in New York City’s SoHo. Becerra studied macrobiotic cooking, prepared meals to heal cancer patients in Philadelphia and lived at a Zen monastery in New Mexico where she cooked vegetarian meals for the monks, sourcing ingredients from the on-premises garden. “Through macrobiotic cooking, I saw the importance of food as a source of health,” she says. “I am always very interested in how food can heal and prevent illness.”

At Navy, Becerra offers a menu that caters to locavore hipsters, with seasonal plates like black bass crudo with rhubarb and pine nuts, tilefish with tomato, avocado and almonds, and soft-shell crab with squash-blossom pancakes. But she’s also partial to her macrobiotic roots. For the lunch menu, Becerra added this bowl of grains and eggs with an eye toward offering guests a midday meal that would energize. “During the day, you don’t want something super-rich that will potentially slow you down,” she says. “For the lunch menu, I focused on lighter dishes with lots of vegetables and superfoods.”

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The 10 Best Comeback Foods (and the Chefs Who Love Them)

by in Chefs and Restaurants, Trends, August 28, 2014

brussels sprout
They used to be the stuff that fueled childhood nightmares: forkfuls of overcooked broccoli or endless orbs of bitter Brussels sprouts that had to be endured in order to tackle, finally, the chocolate ice cream. But today’s renditions of green vegetables don’t require nose-holding or the camouflage of cheese in order to win over legions of fans. From the once-maligned spinach that only Popeye fancied to the leafy kale that went on to wildly successful oversaturation, here’s a passel of formerly shunned vegetables (and a few equally undesirable fruits) that chefs have helped give miraculous makeovers. Read more