All Posts By Toby Amidor

Nutrition Expert at FoodNetwork.com

How to Make A Healthier Soup

by in Healthy Recipes, Healthy Tips, October 8, 2013

broccoli cheddar soup
As the cold weather sets in, bone-warming soups really hit the spot. But there’s no need to pack on the heavy-cream pounds when indulging in a delicious bowl of goodness.

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18 Healthier Fall Baking Recipes

by in Healthy Recipes, October 2, 2013

marbled banana bread
Baking can be a guilt-free pleasure, especially when the end result is a deliciously healthy goodie! Here’s an array of seasonal recipes.

Breads

Muffins

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How to Choose a Healthy Yogurt

by in Healthy Tips, September 29, 2013

yogurt
These days, you can’t miss the yogurt aisle. Markets now have two, three or more cases designated to this creamy delight. But with so many choices, it’s easy to become overwhelmed and confused on which is healthiest.

Added vs. Natural Sugar
Before eyeballing any label, understand that you’ll find sugar in each any yogurt you pick up. Yogurt has natural sugar (called lactose) and unless it’s a plain variety it will also have sugar added for sweetness.  The nutrition facts combine both the natural and added sugar under “sugars.” The only way to know if any sugar was added is to look at the ingredients list.

To keep in line with the recommendations from The American Heart Association, women should limit their sugar to no more than 6 teaspoons per day (or 100 calories’ worth) while men should  eat a max of 9 teaspoons of sugar per day (or 150 calories). This means capping sugar to no more than 20 grams per serving, which would be about 2 teaspoons of added sugar.

Some brands use sugar substitutes instead of added sugar. This will help lower the total sugar amount–remember, you will still be getting natural sugar from the yogurt. I tend to shy away from those varieties and rather purchase a plain yogurt and flavor it myself with a touch of natural sweeteners like honey or maple syrup.

Probiotics
These good bacteria are found in most yogurts help keep your digestive tract in working order. You can find the actual bacteria names under the ingredient list—look for words like L. acidophilus, L. casei, B. bifidum and B. Longum.

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In Season: Swiss Chard

by in In Season, September 26, 2013

swiss chard
This leafy green is in season and ready to bring nutritional goodness to your table.

What, Where & When?
Chard (aka Swiss chard) is a member of the beet family, but doesn’t produce an edible bulb. This green leafy has crinkly green leaves and silver stalks resembling celery ribs. Both the leaves and stalks are edible and the flavor is a cross between spinach and beets. The stems have an earthier beet flavor but are still delicious (even if you’re not a huge beet fan).

Common varieties include Ruby Chard, Rhubarb Chard, and Rainbow Chard. Ruby Chard has bright red stalks and deep red veins while Rhubarb Chard has dark green leaves with a reddish stalk and a stronger flavor. Rainbow Chard are other colorful chard varieties bunched together. The stalk colors vary from pink, orange, red, purple, white with red stripes, and ivory with pink stripes. Chard is in season during late summer into fall.

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5 Ways to Use Applesauce

by in Healthy Recipes, September 24, 2013

applesauce
You can make your own version and simply spoon it out of a bowl, but there’s much more you can do with applesauce. Enjoy it these five ways.

On You Dinner Plate
You may think of applesauce as strictly a snack or dessert, but mix it with light sour cream and nutmeg to serve alongside chicken or pork.

Recipe: Roasted Pork and Potatoes with Creamy Applesauce

Lighter Baked Goodies
Replace half the butter in muffins, cakes or cookies with applesauce. This will save you calories and saturated fat while keeping your baked goodies moist and delicious.

Recipe: Apple Muffins

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Top 5 Fall Vegetables

by in Healthy Recipes, In Season, September 21, 2013

butternut squash
Fall starts tomorrow! And with the arrival of crisp days comes a bounty of seasonal veggies. Here are my top five, plus delicious ways to incorporate them into your meals.

1. Pumpkin
Pumpkins are fun to turn into Jack-o-lanterns, but you can use the flesh, seeds and empty pumpkin shell in your kitchen to make delicious and antioxidant-packed dishes. If cooking with fresh pumpkin is too labor intensive, use canned pumpkin puree (made from 100% pure pumpkin) to get the same nutritional goodness without the hassle.

Recipes to try:

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New Twists on Pasta (A Guide to Alternative Noodles)

by in Healthy Tips, September 19, 2013

spelt pasta

Whether you’re looking for a gluten-free pasta, trying to eat more whole grains or experimenting with ancient grains, you can find all kinds of alternative pastas lining market shelves these days. Here’s a quick primer.

Quinoa Pasta
Quinoa is a high protein whole grain (technically, it’s a seed) that has become very popular. The grain provides hefty doses of B-vitamins, potassium, magnesium, selenium, iron and zinc. Quinoa pasta has a nutty flavor and a dense consistency. Although quinoa is gluten-free, the pasta can be blended with other flours, including whole wheat flour, so be sure to read labels carefully.

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Great Muffin Makeovers

by in Healthy Recipes, September 15, 2013

Apple Muffins
Store-bought muffins, a grab-and-go favorite, can average a hefty 400 to 500 calories each. Make your own healthier version and you’ll get the same delicious flavor for about half the calories.

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5 Fun Things To Do With Tomato Sauce

by in Healthy Recipes, September 7, 2013

eggs in tomato sauce
When the season comes to a close, don’t let those fresh tomatoes go to waste! Make your own tomato sauce, then freeze and use it these five ways.

#1: Soup
Make a speedy bowl of tomato soup using tomato sauce. It’s a perfect way to get your dose of lycopene, an antioxidant shown to help lower the risk of heart disease and cancer.

Recipe: Quick and Spicy Tomato Soup

#2: Eggs
Shakshuka (aka Eggs in Purgatory) is a mouthwatering Israeli dish. Cut prep time by using premade tomato sauce like in Giada’s recipe.

Recipe: Eggs in Purgatory (above)

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