All Posts By Toby Amidor

Nutrition Expert at FoodNetwork.com

Food Day 2011

by in Food News, October 20, 2011

food day
October 24, 2011 is the date of the first annual Food Day. Each year on this date Americans will celebrate and push for healthy, reasonably priced food that’s produced is an eco-friendly and sustainable way.  This year you’ll find schools, communities, health professionals, chefs, and foodies celebrating Food Day in their own way.

What’s Food Day?
Food Day is sponsored by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, which is a nonprofit group that has been working to improve nutrition, health and food labeling since 1971. The Co-Chairs for Food Day are Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA) and Representative Rosa DeLauro (D-CT). On the National Advisory Board are a collection of impressive public figures including Dr. Marion Nestle, Walter Willett, Alice Waters, Morgan Spurlock, David Katz, Michael Pollan, Ellie Krieger, and many more.

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Inside Scoop: Hot New Foods

by in Food News, October 18, 2011
new foods
Hot new foods to look for at the grocery store.

Is your head swirling with all the newest “healthy” products you see on market shelves? I just attended the annual Food & Nutrition Conference and Expo in San Diego, California where I was able to check out several hot new items. Here are my top 7 tasty finds.

pom juice1. Lite Pom
Who doesn’t love the goodness of pomegranate juice? But many folks find juice in general to be overly sweet with too much sugar. Pom Light contains 75 calories per 8 fluid-ounce serving and 18 grams of sugar. That’s 50 percent fewer calories and almost half as much sugar than the regular version of Pom juice. Yes, light juices exist but Pom cuts down on the sugar by mixing it with water. Sound crazy? Think about this: Many folks who find juice too sweet or they want to cut down on calories mix juice with water at home. And since you’re getting less juice, the cost is cheaper too. Pom Light comes in really fun flavors like dragonfruit, black currant, blackberry, and pomegranate (the dragonfruit was particularly tasty).

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Nutrients A Vegetarian Should Worry About

by in Healthy Tips, October 17, 2011
fruit on plate
Do vegetarians get the nutrients they need?

The term “vegetarian” can pretty broad and can mean different things to different people. We’ll walk through the basic types and fill you in on which nutrients those with a meat-free diet need to pay special attention to.

Vegetarian Basics
There are different types of vegetarians depending on what someone chooses to include in their diet. But all vegetarians include plant foods from the following categories:

  • Grains such as rice, wheat, oats, and millet
  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Legumes which include beans, peas, lentils
  • Nuts
  • Seeds like sesame and sunflower

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Taste Test: Mayonnaise

by in Grocery Shopping, Taste Test, October 14, 2011
mayonnaise
Which one of these is best?

Our Healthy Eats readers had lots to say about the mayo debate, where we discussed whether or not this condiment is healthy. But with so many varieties of mayo to choose from, taste was a concern too. Taste testing 5 jars of mayo is no easy feat, but someone had to do it.

It’s All About Portions
It’s okay to eat mayo! Just don’t eat it by the cupful or you’ll be downing 1440 calories and 160 grams fat. If you want to use the real deal — full fat mayonnaise, then be sure to keep portions in check at 1 to 2 tablespoons per serving. One tablespoon of mayonnaise contains 103 calories, 12 grams fat, and 2 grams saturated fat.

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Nuts About Almonds

by in Healthy Recipes, Healthy Tips, October 13, 2011

almonds
We’ve told you all about grains, legumes, herbs and seasonal produce. In this new series we’ll explore the nuts we’re crazy about —  let’s get cracking!

Almond Basics
Almonds originated in central Asia and their cultivation has been traced back to Biblical times. In ancient Egypt, almonds were left in King Tut’s tomb to keep him nourished in the afterlife. These crunchy goodies were brought over to the United States from Spain in 1700. Two hundred years later, the almond industry was booming in California.

Almonds are the seeds of a fruit tree that’s related to the rose family. They’re grown in California, Australia, the Mediterranean and South Africa. There are two main types of almonds: sweet and bitter. Sweet almonds have a delicate and slightly sweet flavor and are the variety that most folks eat. Bitter almonds contain a toxic chemical called hydrocyanic acid and can be lethal when eaten raw. The chemical is destroyed once it is heated and the almond is then safe to eat. Bitter almonds aren’t allowed to be sold in the United States, though processed bitter almonds are used in flavor extracts and liqueurs.

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Dr. Oz’s Apple Juice Experiment

by in Food News, October 12, 2011

Dr. Oz
Dr. Oz made headlines recently after his September 14th show, when he pointed a finger at the FDA for not regulating the amount of arsenic found in apple juice. The FDA, on the other hand, is claiming that Dr. Oz is guilty of irresponsible reporting. Who should we be listening to?

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Veggie Chips: Are They Healthy?

by in Healthy Tips, Is It Healthy?, October 10, 2011

vegetable chips
These potato chip-alternatives have been cropping up on market shelves everywhere. But are veggie chips a healthier pick? Here’s a look at the crunchy details.

YES?
Some of the more popular brands of veggie chips are much lower in sodium than traditional varieties. One ounce of Original Terra Chips contains 50 milligrams of sodium while an ounce (about 15 chips) of traditional potato chips contains over three times that amount (180 milligrams). The amount of salt, however isn’t always lower in veggie chips. Some brands contain even more than potato chips and other snack foods.

Both potato and veggie chips usually contain 10 percent of your daily dose of vitamin C, but some varieties of veggie chips (like sweet potato) also contain 50 percent of your recommended amount of vitamin A.

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10 Ways To Reduce Sodium

by in Healthy Tips, September 29, 2011
food label
Are you paying attention to your sodium intake?

Nine out of 10 Americans eat too much salt. It’s estimated that 77 percent of our salt comes from processed and restaurant foods. If your goal is to eat less salt, here are 10 simple ways to do it.

#1: Use fresh or frozen vegetables instead of canned
One-half cup of canned vegetables has about 15 percent of your daily sodium requirements. This is no surprise since sodium is used to preserve canned food. Instead, choose fresh or frozen vegetables whenever possible. If you’re stuck on the convenience of canned veggies, low sodium varieties are also available.

#2: Make your own potato chips
Chips are brimming with salt, but luckily you can make your own in a snap! My kids and chip-addicted husband loved Ellie’s Cracked Pepper Potato Chips. You can always adjust the spices to your liking.

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Store-Bought Juice Blends: Are They Healthy?

by in Healthy Tips, Is It Healthy?, September 28, 2011
juice blends
They seem healthy, but are they really?

Store shelves are lined with juice blends promising various health benefits. But are they really as healthy as they’re hyped up to be? Here’s the lowdown on 3 popular store-bought juice blends.

Naked’s Green Machine
Naked makes a variety of juice blends including one of their more popular varieties called the Green Machine. They promote their product saying “Greens are one of the most underconsumed foods in the average person’s diet. Drink ‘em up!” One 15.2 fluid ounce contain has 140 calories, 50 percent of your daily dose of vitamin A, and 11 percent of the daily recommended amount of potassium.

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Rosh Hashanah Side Dishes

by in Healthy Holidays, Healthy Recipes, September 27, 2011
jicama-orange salad
Food Network Magazine's Jicama-Orange Salad.

Scrambling to find creative sides for the Jewish New Year? Look no further. This collection includes fresh ideas and some lightened up classics.

Recipes To Try:

Have extra apples lying around after the holiday? Turn them into a delicious applesauce.