All Posts By Toby Amidor

Nutrition Expert at FoodNetwork.com

24 Healthy Summer Salads

by in Healthy Recipes, July 24, 2012

buffalo chicken salad
A nice cool salad can help beat the summer heat and give you an antioxidant boost. But did you know fruit and veggies also help quench your daily fluid needs? Stay refreshed with these recipes.

Main Dishes
Dive in to a delicious array of summer produce, perfect for lunch or dinner on a steamy summer day. Each of these recipes has less than 400 calories per serving.

Read more

Baked Potato Chips: Are They Healthy?

by in Is It Healthy?, July 21, 2012

baked potato chips
A health halo has been placed on baked chips while fried chips have been getting a bad rap. But are you really making a healthy choice when you toss a bag of baked chips into your shopping cart? Let’s take a closer look.

Yes?
One ounce (about 15 chips) of baked potato chips has 14% fewer calories (153 vs. 131), 50% less fat (10 grams vs. 5 grams) and 67% less saturated fat (3 grams vs. 1 gram) than traditional potato chips. If you’re looking at the calories and fat alone, then you would assume it was the healthier choice.

Read more

5 Ways to Eat Healthier At Work

by in Healthy Tips, July 16, 2012

eat at work Having a hectic day? Don’t let your healthy eating habits slip through the cracks. Follow these 5 tips to make sure you stay on track while you’re at work.

#1: Eat Breakfast
I can’t stress the importance of a healthy breakfast to help you settle into a hunger-free morning. Even if you’re the type of person who grabs their cup of Joe and runs out the door, make an effort to take in a piece of fresh fruit, yogurt or slice of whole grain bread with a tablespoon natural peanut butter.

#2: Step Away
According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 83 percent of Americans claim to eat meals and snacks at their desks. Instead of mindlessly gobbling down whatever’s in front of you, step away from your desk, computer, electronic devices . . . you get the picture. Have a seat somewhere quiet where you can relax and enjoy each bite.

Read more

Picnic Foods Nutrition Experts Avoid

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, July 13, 2012
potato chips
Don't fill up on chips at your next picnic.

Some barbecue foods are healthy while others can bust your waistline. We asked expert dietitians from around the country which barbecue and picnic foods they tell their clients to avoid.

Chips
The Nutrition Twins Tammy Lakatos and Lyssie Lakatos, registered dietitians, personal trainers and authors of The Secret to Skinny said, “We tell our clients to watch out when they are munching on chips since it’s hard to stick to just one serving; it always turns into many handfuls. Plus, chips don’t satiate you and the salt makes you hungrier and thirstier–so you eat more and drink more and end up consuming a lot of extra calories.”

Read more

High-Fiber Recipes

by in Healthy Recipes, July 12, 2012

garden burger
Ever wonder if your dishes are high in certain nutrients? In this new series, we’ll tell you just that. Since most folks don’t get their daily fill of fiber, we thought that’d be a great place to start.

The Guidelines
The recommendations for fiber ranges from 20 to 38 grams per day—depending on age and gender. However, a good goal for anyone to aim for is 25 grams per day. Each of the recipes below contains at least 20 percent of your daily dose of fiber, which is 5 grams.

Fiber is an important part of your healthy eating plan for many reasons. It can help lower cholesterol and can help to reduce the risk of colon cancer, plus it makes you feel full for longer and can help maintain a healthy digestive system.

Read more about the health benefits of fiber.

The Recipes

#1: Whole Wheat Spaghetti With Swiss Chard and Pecorino Cheese
The majority of the fiber in this dish comes from the whole-wheat pasta (about 6 grams per serving), but the onions, Swiss chard and tomatoes also contribute a small amount (about 4 grams per serving).

Total fiber per serving: 11 grams = 44% of your recommended daily dose

Read more

Healthiest Fast-Food Menu Items

by in Dining Out, July 10, 2012

wendy's chicken wrap
Car trips are a fun way to spend time with your family, but with most rest stops fronting fast food joints, healthy eating can seem impossible. If you’re tired of continually saying NO to fast food—ease up, there are healthier choices you can make. Check out our list so you’re prepared on your next trip.

Wendy’s
It was refreshing to see several healthy options provided on the Wendy’s website including the Grilled Chicken Go Wrap (pictured above) with a side of small chili (totaling 470 calories for the meal). The problem is, I’m not sure I’d want to be in a car with someone who just had chili! Luckily, you can opt for the baked potato instead or even the wrap with a small side salad (also for 470 calories). Looking to cut calories down? Wendy’s allows you to hold ingredients (like cheese or sour cream) so you tailor the meal to your liking.

Check out more healthy Wendy’s options.

Read more

Herb of the Month: Thyme

by in In Season, July 5, 2012

thyme
‘Tis the season to pick up fresh thyme. Packed with flavor and nutritious goodness, make this delicious herb part of your next meal.

Thyme Basics
This perennial herb is a member of the mint family and is native to southern Europe and the Mediterranean. It comes in dozens of varieties but the most common is Garden Thyme which has grayish leaves that emit a minty and lemony aroma. Subvarieties include French, English and Lemon thyme. French thyme has a more narrow leaf while English has a broader-sized leaf. Lemon thyme has a more pungent citrus aroma than other thyme varieties.

Nutrition Info
One tablespoon of fresh thyme has 3 calories and 8% of your daily dose of vitamin C. It also contains vitamin A, iron, and manganese. Thyme has also been used medicinally to help relieve a sore throat.

Read more

Eating By Color: Red, White and Blue

by in Uncategorized, July 4, 2012

potato salad
Celebrate July 4th by getting the most out of your red, white, and blue foods. We’re not talking artificially-colored goodies, but rather fresh and delicious fruits and veggies in naturally-patriotic tones.

Red
Red hued foods have tons of antioxidants like vitamins A and C. They get their red color from phytochemicals like lycopene and anthocyanins. Lycopene is an antioxidant found in foods like watermelon and tomatoes and helps protect our healthy tissues from free-radical damage. Anthocyanins are found in foods like cherries and strawberries. This powerful antioxidant helps fight inflammation and protects your blood vessels and nervous system.

30 Days of Stone Fruit

by in Uncategorized, July 2, 2012

grilled peaches
Apricots, nectarines, peaches, cherries and plums . . . oh my! Pick up any or all of these in-season stone fruit at a market near you. Here are 30 ways you can enjoy.

  1. Did you know fruits whose flesh and skin grow around a hard pit are known as “stone fruits?”
  2. You can grill up your favorite stone fruit.
  3. Enjoy Ellie’s Savory Peach Chicken.
  4. Top your morning oatmeal or yogurt with sliced apricots, plums, peaches or nectarines.
  5. Combine plums with McIntosh apples for a Plum Applesauce. Read more

Why We Love Shrimp

by in Uncategorized, June 30, 2012

grilled shrimp

For years my culinary students have told me how much they love shrimp. They’re pretty surprised when I tell them that these crustaceans are not only delicious, but good for you too! Here’s why we love shrimp and how you can too.

Shrimp Facts

90% of the shrimp Americans consume is imported from countries in the Central and South America and Asia-Pacific regions. The hundreds of species of shrimp are typically divided into 2 basic categories: warm-water and cold-water shrimp. The rule of thumb is the colder the water, the smaller and juicier the shrimp.

Shrimp ranges in hue from deep red to pink to grayish-white to yellow and even dark green. When cooked, most shrimp shells change color due to a heat-induced chemical change.

You can buy shrimp according to their size—usually you’ll find that larger shrimp cost a prettier penny. Colossal shrimp usually come 10 or less per pound, jumbo 11-15 per pound, extra-large 16-20 per pound, large 21-30 per pound, medium 31-35 per pound, small 36-45 per pound and miniature about 100 per pound. Of course, these numbers can vary from region to region. As a general rule, one pound of whole, raw shrimp yields ½ to ¾ pound of cooked meat.

Shrimp is available all year round. They can be found in various forms at your local market such as shelled or unshelled, cooked or raw and fresh or frozen.

Read more