All Posts By Toby Amidor

Nutrition Expert at FoodNetwork.com

Talking With the Co-Founder of Garden Lites

by in Grocery Shopping, December 8, 2012

garden lites
This line of gluten-free frozen dishes, soufflés, and veggie muffins has taken the market by storm. I spoke with Garden Lites’ co-founder Jeff Moskowitz to find out the secret of their success.

Q1. How did you come up with the idea of creating Garden Lites foods?
I wanted to make foods that would help people live a healthier lifestyle. There’s no healthier food than vegetables, but people seem to look at veggies as something they HAVE to eat versus something they WANT to eat. I wanted to change that perception.

Q2. You have a delicious line of soufflés. Are they meant to be eaten on their own or can they be used in cooking?
Our consumers eat them for breakfast, lunch or a hearty snack as well as cut them up and serve as a side dish. The soufflés also make a wonderful ingredient. We started a partnership with Meatless Monday where we post meatless recipes using our soufflés on our social media and cross promote it on Meatless Monday’s Facebook page. That has been very successful. We have a lot of really amazing recipe ideas (like our Veggie Lasagna below), which you can find on our website. We will also be expanding our recipe section on our new website starting in January 2013.

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Family-Friendly Hannukah Fare

by in Healthy Holidays, December 6, 2012

potato pancakes
Hanukkah has always been one of my favorite holidays. Baked goodies, chocolate coins, and 8 days of gifts—what’s not to like during this festival of lights? As an RD and mom, I want to teach my kids healthy eating habits even on holidays (no need for fried EVERYTHING) and I also want to watch my own waistline. Here are some healthy, Hanukkah-licious recipes that are perfect for the entire family.

Appetizers

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Talking to the Expert: “The Germ Guy” Jason Tetro

by in Food Safety, December 5, 2012

jason tetro germ guy
With cold and flu season upon us, it’s important to get the facts on how to prevent the spread of germs in and out of the kitchen. I had the pleasure to speaking with Jason Tetro – AKA The Germ Guy—where we discussed how to keep your kitchen safe, the calming effects of hand washing  and why kids should eat dirt.

Q. How did you come to be known as the “Germ Guy?”
Back in 2008, I was asked by the local television station, CTV Ottawa to do regular question and answer segments on germs and our relationship with them in our daily lives. The host, Leanne Cusack, felt that my title, “University of Ottawa Microbiologist Jason Tetro” was a little too long and shortened it to “The Germ Guy.”  The name stuck in the community and soon, I was better known by that moniker. I went on to develop my own blog and then became a contributor for the Huffington Post.

Q. I heard that you always wear a loose piece of clothing in order to help prevent the spread of germs. Can you explain?
One of the best ways to prevent infection is simply to avoid exposure through the nose and mouth.  I tend to wear a loose undershirt so that when I am around someone who is obviously sick and not following proper etiquette – such as sneezing or coughing into the elbow – I take the matter into my own hands and cover my nose and mouth with the shirt.  It’s come in handy in many places and thankfully, I’ve never been mistaken for a robber!

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Red Wine: Is It Healthy?

by in Is It Healthy?, December 4, 2012

red wine
Red wine has been coined the good-for-you alcohol. My clients often tell me they choose red wine over other alcoholic beverages because it’s good for their heart. Does red wine really provide this amazing-for-you benefit or is it an over-hyped health halo? Mull over the pros and cons.

Yes?
The Dietary Guidelines for Americans say that if you would like to sip on alcohol, have a maximum of one drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men. When it comes to wine (red or white), one drink is equivalent to 5-fluid ounces of wine (or about 125 calories). For beer, one serving is 12-fluid ounces and hard alcohol it’s 1½ -fluid ounces of an 80-proof liquor (like rum or vodka)—both range between 100-150 calories per serving.

For those looking to maintain or lose weight I often recommend sticking to wine because the calories are easier to control. Hard alcohol is typically used in mixed cocktails. The combo of multiple shots along with juice and/or other mixers can skyrocket calories in a flash.

Many folks choose red wine because of the health benefits. Studies have found the polyphenol antioxidant resveratrol found in red wine may help protect the lining of blood vessels in your heart.

Studies have also found that red wine may be linked to breast cancer prevention. A 2011 study published in the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology found that resveratrol help stop breast cancer cells from growing.

You can also find delicious bottles of red wine at a low cost. See our top 5 red wines for those on a budget.

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High-Vitamin C Recipes

by in Healthy Recipes, November 27, 2012

beef pops
To help increase your immunity this cold and flu season, give yourself an extra boost of vitamin C (no supplements required!). This antioxidant is found in a wide range of foods from potatoes to bell peppers. Check out these 5 delicious, vitamin-C rich recipes.

The Guidelines
The recommended daily amount of vitamin C is 60 milligrams. Each of the recipes below contains at least 20% (or 12 milligrams) of your daily recommended dose.

Vitamin C has many other roles besides helping stave off the common cold. It also helps form collagen, a building block of connective tissue that gives strength to skin, hair, and nails.  Vitamin C also helps increase the body’s absorption of iron.

The Recipes

Beef Pops With Pineapple and Parsley Sauce (above)
These bite-sized skewers get most of their vitamin C from the pineapple chunks. Surprisingly, the rest of the vitamin C (over 15% of your daily dose) is from the chopped parsley.

Recommended daily amount of vitamin C: 53%

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Spice of the Month: Ground Ginger

by in Healthy Recipes, November 25, 2012

ginger
This popular ingredient can spice up more than gingerbread cookies. Get the basics plus winter warming healthy recipes.

Ginger Basics
This culinary spice dates back close to 4500 years ago where it was used in southeastern Asia, China, and India. The Romans brought it from China about 2000 years ago; it then spread throughout Europe.

Today ginger is produced in India, China, Nigeria, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Thailand. In the United States, main producers include California, Hawaii and Florida.

Ginger has a spicy, earthy flavor that compliments nutmeg or cinnamon.

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Dressing Up Thanksgiving Leftovers

by in Thanksgiving, November 23, 2012

turkey soup
Turkey Day leftovers are good on their own, but you can also transform them into something magnificent. Check out our easy, mouthwatering ideas for dressing up your Thanksgiving leftovers.

Turkey

Use the turkey carcass, leftover dark meat and even leftover veggie sides to whip up this deliciously warming soup.
Recipe:Next Day Turkey Soup

Leftover turkey breast combines with beans, chili peppers, and jack cheese makes a mean chili.
Recipe:  Leftover Turkey Chili

Make a delish panini using turkey, stuffing and cranberry sauce.
Recipe: Turkey, Dressing, and Cranberry Panini

Combine chunks of leftover turkey with celery, apple, grapes and pecans for a main-dish salad or light lunch.
Recipe: Waldorf Salad.

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Which is Healthier: Pumpkin or Pecan Pie?

by in Thanksgiving, November 22, 2012

pumpkin and pecan pie
These super-popular Thanksgiving desserts are going head to head. With both having single pie crusts and packed with good-for-you ingredients, the competition is fierce. Which gets your vote?

Pumpkin Pie

Pros:
According to the USDA’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans, we should all be eating 2 cups of orange veggies each week. Pumpkin pie can help meet these recommendations plus that brilliant orange color provides the antioxidants vitamin A and lutein.

Cons:
Fatty ingredients like traditional pastry crust, butter, cream cheese, half-and-half, or shortening can sabotage the nutritional value. Mountains of sugar from canned pumpkin pie filling and spoonfuls of sugary toppings can also send calories through the roof. Topped with whipped cream or a la mode, a slice can weigh in at close to 500 calories.

Healthy Pumpkin Pie Tips:

  • Use gingersnap cookies for a lighter crust made without partially hydrogenated oils or make your own canola oil pie crust.
  • No need for mounds of sugar—let the sweetness of the pumpkin take over.
  • Steer clear of sugary or heavily-sweetened pumpkin pie filling. The canned pumpkin puree should have one ingredient; add your own spices from there.
  • Serve with one heaping spoon of freshly made whipped cream and fresh fruit like apples, oranges and pears.
  • Try Food Network Kitchens slimmed version.

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Thanksgiving Day Breakfast

by in Thanksgiving, November 21, 2012

chocolate oatmeal
Although a turkey feast is approaching, it’s important to fuel up the morning of Thanksgiving. A well-balanced breakfast will give you enough energy to pleasantly chat with family and friends—no need to be agitated and hungry when you see everyone. Plus, eating breakfast can keep hunger under control and keep you level-headed and ready to make more reasonable choices when it’s time for the big meal.

Breakfast Goals
Quick and simple does the trick. With all the hustle and bustle of last minute holiday prep, there’s no need to slave in the kitchen. Your goal is about a 400-500 calorie breakfast which should include whole grains, fruit, and dairy. Make sure you get in enough fiber to hold you until the holiday meal.

#1: Oatmeal
Oats are a whole grain and they’re brimming with fiber and energy-boosting B-vitamins. Cook with skim or almond milk and top with fresh fruit, nuts and spices.

Recipe: Food Network Kitchens’ Hot Chocolate Banana-Nut Oatmeal (pictured above)

#2: Eggs
There are so many ways to enjoy this protein-rich breakfast favorite. For a fun holiday twist try my recipe which includes whole grains, eggs and dairy using only 5 ingredients.

Recipe: Eggs In a Basket

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Thanksgiving Dinner-Hopping Strategies

by in Healthy Holidays, Healthy Tips, Thanksgiving, November 21, 2012

thanksgiving dinner
Are you a feast hopper– stopping by 2 or even 3 Turkey Day meals every year? Follow these tips so you can enjoy holiday favorites without feeling like you need to roll home by the end of the evening.

Strategy #1: Come Hungry, Not Starving
Arrive at your first feast famished and you’ll probably end up over-stuffing yourself. You’ll feel tired (turkey coma?) and can even end up with heartburn. At the next house, you’ll turn down Aunt Mary’s famous pie and insult the whole family (oh, the drama!). Have a small snack about 30-45 minutes before your first stop. A piece of fruit, granola bar or nonfat Greek yogurt will do the trick.

Strategy #2: Enjoy the Conversation
Instead of shoveling food with lightening speed, put down the fork and enjoy chatting with family and friends. This also helps slow down your food flow, enabling you to eat less and leaving room for feast #2.

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