All Posts By Toby Amidor

Nutrition Expert at FoodNetwork.com

High-Vitamin C Recipes

by in Healthy Recipes, November 27, 2012

beef pops
To help increase your immunity this cold and flu season, give yourself an extra boost of vitamin C (no supplements required!). This antioxidant is found in a wide range of foods from potatoes to bell peppers. Check out these 5 delicious, vitamin-C rich recipes.

The Guidelines
The recommended daily amount of vitamin C is 60 milligrams. Each of the recipes below contains at least 20% (or 12 milligrams) of your daily recommended dose.

Vitamin C has many other roles besides helping stave off the common cold. It also helps form collagen, a building block of connective tissue that gives strength to skin, hair, and nails.  Vitamin C also helps increase the body’s absorption of iron.

The Recipes

Beef Pops With Pineapple and Parsley Sauce (above)
These bite-sized skewers get most of their vitamin C from the pineapple chunks. Surprisingly, the rest of the vitamin C (over 15% of your daily dose) is from the chopped parsley.

Recommended daily amount of vitamin C: 53%

Read more

Spice of the Month: Ground Ginger

by in Healthy Recipes, November 25, 2012

ginger
This popular ingredient can spice up more than gingerbread cookies. Get the basics plus winter warming healthy recipes.

Ginger Basics
This culinary spice dates back close to 4500 years ago where it was used in southeastern Asia, China, and India. The Romans brought it from China about 2000 years ago; it then spread throughout Europe.

Today ginger is produced in India, China, Nigeria, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Thailand. In the United States, main producers include California, Hawaii and Florida.

Ginger has a spicy, earthy flavor that compliments nutmeg or cinnamon.

Read more

Dressing Up Thanksgiving Leftovers

by in Thanksgiving, November 23, 2012

turkey soup
Turkey Day leftovers are good on their own, but you can also transform them into something magnificent. Check out our easy, mouthwatering ideas for dressing up your Thanksgiving leftovers.

Turkey

Use the turkey carcass, leftover dark meat and even leftover veggie sides to whip up this deliciously warming soup.
Recipe:Next Day Turkey Soup

Leftover turkey breast combines with beans, chili peppers, and jack cheese makes a mean chili.
Recipe:  Leftover Turkey Chili

Make a delish panini using turkey, stuffing and cranberry sauce.
Recipe: Turkey, Dressing, and Cranberry Panini

Combine chunks of leftover turkey with celery, apple, grapes and pecans for a main-dish salad or light lunch.
Recipe: Waldorf Salad.

Read more

Which is Healthier: Pumpkin or Pecan Pie?

by in Thanksgiving, November 22, 2012

pumpkin and pecan pie
These super-popular Thanksgiving desserts are going head to head. With both having single pie crusts and packed with good-for-you ingredients, the competition is fierce. Which gets your vote?

Pumpkin Pie

Pros:
According to the USDA’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans, we should all be eating 2 cups of orange veggies each week. Pumpkin pie can help meet these recommendations plus that brilliant orange color provides the antioxidants vitamin A and lutein.

Cons:
Fatty ingredients like traditional pastry crust, butter, cream cheese, half-and-half, or shortening can sabotage the nutritional value. Mountains of sugar from canned pumpkin pie filling and spoonfuls of sugary toppings can also send calories through the roof. Topped with whipped cream or a la mode, a slice can weigh in at close to 500 calories.

Healthy Pumpkin Pie Tips:

  • Use gingersnap cookies for a lighter crust made without partially hydrogenated oils or make your own canola oil pie crust.
  • No need for mounds of sugar—let the sweetness of the pumpkin take over.
  • Steer clear of sugary or heavily-sweetened pumpkin pie filling. The canned pumpkin puree should have one ingredient; add your own spices from there.
  • Serve with one heaping spoon of freshly made whipped cream and fresh fruit like apples, oranges and pears.
  • Try Food Network Kitchens slimmed version.

Read more

Thanksgiving Day Breakfast

by in Thanksgiving, November 21, 2012

chocolate oatmeal
Although a turkey feast is approaching, it’s important to fuel up the morning of Thanksgiving. A well-balanced breakfast will give you enough energy to pleasantly chat with family and friends—no need to be agitated and hungry when you see everyone. Plus, eating breakfast can keep hunger under control and keep you level-headed and ready to make more reasonable choices when it’s time for the big meal.

Breakfast Goals
Quick and simple does the trick. With all the hustle and bustle of last minute holiday prep, there’s no need to slave in the kitchen. Your goal is about a 400-500 calorie breakfast which should include whole grains, fruit, and dairy. Make sure you get in enough fiber to hold you until the holiday meal.

#1: Oatmeal
Oats are a whole grain and they’re brimming with fiber and energy-boosting B-vitamins. Cook with skim or almond milk and top with fresh fruit, nuts and spices.

Recipe: Food Network Kitchens’ Hot Chocolate Banana-Nut Oatmeal (pictured above)

#2: Eggs
There are so many ways to enjoy this protein-rich breakfast favorite. For a fun holiday twist try my recipe which includes whole grains, eggs and dairy using only 5 ingredients.

Recipe: Eggs In a Basket

Read more

Thanksgiving Dinner-Hopping Strategies

by in Healthy Holidays, Healthy Tips, Thanksgiving, November 21, 2012

thanksgiving dinner
Are you a feast hopper– stopping by 2 or even 3 Turkey Day meals every year? Follow these tips so you can enjoy holiday favorites without feeling like you need to roll home by the end of the evening.

Strategy #1: Come Hungry, Not Starving
Arrive at your first feast famished and you’ll probably end up over-stuffing yourself. You’ll feel tired (turkey coma?) and can even end up with heartburn. At the next house, you’ll turn down Aunt Mary’s famous pie and insult the whole family (oh, the drama!). Have a small snack about 30-45 minutes before your first stop. A piece of fruit, granola bar or nonfat Greek yogurt will do the trick.

Strategy #2: Enjoy the Conversation
Instead of shoveling food with lightening speed, put down the fork and enjoy chatting with family and friends. This also helps slow down your food flow, enabling you to eat less and leaving room for feast #2.

Read more

10 Healthiest Thanksgiving Sides

by in Healthy Recipes, Thanksgiving, November 13, 2012

roasted squash
These Thanksgiving sides all have fewer than 250 calories per serving and will get the attention and admiration of everyone at your table because they’re so unbelievably delicious. Don’t say I didn’t warn you!

Squash
Yummy slices of winter squash topped with maple syrup and a touch of lemon juice.

Recipe: Lemon Maple Squash (pictured above)

Stuffing
Traditional stuffing recipes can easily have 400-500 calories per servings. Sandra uses fresh mushrooms with herbs and spices to bring out the flavor and not your waistline.

Recipe: Sage and Mushroom Stuffing

Read more

Why We Love Pears

by in Healthy Recipes, November 8, 2012

tilapia with pears
A lot folks out there don’t show enough love to this under-appreciated fruit. Find out what you’ve been missing.

Pear Facts
Pears are one of the few fruits that don’t ripen on the tree. They’re harvested when mature but not quite ripe to eat. They ripen when left at room temperature, becoming sweeter and more succulent from the inside out.

For most varieties, you can’t judge the ripeness of a pear based on its color. Instead you should “Check the Neck.” The USA pear growers came up with this catchy phrase to remind pear lovers to gently apply pressure around the neck of the pear with your thumb. If your thumb yields to the pressure, then you’ve got yourself a nice, juicy pear. Once a pear is ripe, you can store it in the fridge for up to 5 days.

Other pear tips:

  • Like apples, pears also brown once sliced. To prevent browning, dip them in a 50:50 mixture of water and lemon juice.
  • Place under-ripe pears in a bowl with fruit like bananas that give off ethylene and speed up ripening.
  • Wash pears thoroughly before eating in order to eliminate dirt and bacteria. Be sure to pay special attention to the pear near the stem and bottom by gently scrubbing.

Read more

8 Healthy Pumpkin Recipes

by in Healthy Recipes, In Season, November 7, 2012

pumpkin risotto
Packed with vitamin A, pumpkins are good for more than carving, and it’s time to expand your palate beyond pumpkin pie. They’re absolutely delicious in any of these 8 healthy recipes.

Nutrition Lowdown
Both fresh and canned pumpkins are packed with nutritional goodness. Oftentimes, recipes will use the canned pumpkin since it takes a little work to use fresh. If you choose canned pumpkin, make sure to purchase 100% pureed pumpkin, not pie filling (check the ingredient list).

One cup of canned pumpkin has 83 calories, 1 gram of fat and 7 grams of fiber. It also has close to 800% of your daily recommended amount of vitamin A, 49% of the daily recommended amount of vitamin K and 19% of your daily recommended amount of iron. It also has a good amount of vitamins E and C, pantothenic acid, magnesium, potassium, copper and manganese.

Creamy Risotto
This recipe uses a combo of diced and pureed pumpkin. Combined with mascarpone and fresh Parmesan cheese, it’s heavenly.

Recipe: Creamy Baked Pumpkin Risotto (above)

Spiked Punch
Pureed pumpkin mixed with brown sugar, cinnamon and a splash of rum (for the adults) will help warm you up on a chilly night.

Recipe: Mexican Pumpkin Punch

Read more

Food Fight: Agave vs. Honey

by in Food Fight, Healthy Tips, November 1, 2012

honey
This is going to be our toughest food fight yet! Two natural sweeteners pitted against each other – it’s a very difficult decision.

Agave
Most agave nectar is produced from the blue agave plant grown in desert regions like the hilly areas in Mexico. The syrup is extracted from the “honey water” found at core of the plant, filtered, heated and then processed to make it into thicker nectar you see at the store. This makes agave a good sweetener for vegans (who don’t eat honey).

Agave nectar has a dark amber color, but has a more neutral flavor than honey. One tablespoon of the sweetener has about 60 calories compared to about 45 and 60 in the same amount of granulated sugar and honey, respectively. It’s 1 ½ times sweeter than sugar and so you can use less of it. Agave easily dissolves in cold liquids like smoothies and iced tea and can be used to replace granulated sugar in baked products (see instructions below). Many food manufacturers also use agave nectar in products like energy drinks and bars because of its light flavor and over-hyped nutritional benefits.

Read more

...10...181920...304050...