All Posts By Sally Wadyka

The Healthy Eats Q & A: Masaharu Morimoto

by in Chefs and Restaurants, April 28, 2014

masaharu morimoto
Japanese-born Iron Chef Masaharu Morimoto planned on becoming a baseball player. But luckily — at least  for the food world — a shoulder injury sidelined those plans and he switched careers. Today, he oversees a family of restaurants around the world, including New York City’s Morimoto. While true to his Japanese roots, Morimoto’s cooking fuses the best of both Eastern and Western gastronomy, with results that are as delicious as they are innovative. Here, he answers the Healthy Eats Q & A.

What health food trend would you like to see go away?
Anything that is too extreme. For example, low-carb versus no-carb. If you go for a no-carb diet, you cannot eat even healthy dishes like sushi. So, if you eat everything in moderation, including carbs, you can enjoy your favorite dishes without overdoing it.

Chia seeds: Love them or leave them?
I have not tried Chia seeds before, so I don’t know if I love them or want to leave them!

What shortcuts do you use when you’re cooking?
Using the microwave! There are many high-tech microwave these days, and you can adjust the cooking time and temperature easily. My wife often microwaves sweet potatoes for our dog, and I like to eat them too!

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Bringing Back the Family Dinner, One Tasty Cauliflower Recipe at a Time

by in Cookbooks, April 21, 2014

laurie david
A longtime filmmaker and environmental activist (she produced the Academy Award–winning documentary An Inconvenient Truth), Laurie David is now on a crusade to change the way America eats. A lofty goal, for sure, but after revamping the way her own family approached food, she’s primed to share her practical yet sly spin on healthier home cooking (sample recipe: Roasted Cauliflower “Popcorn”). A few years back, she coauthored The Family Dinner: Great Ways to Connect with Your Kids One Meal at a Timecookbook that combined recipes with advice on how to establish a regular and semi-sane dinner routine. She’s now followed that up with her new book, The Family Cooks: 100+ Recipes to Get Your Family Craving Food That’s Simple, Tasty, and Incredibly Good for You, out this week. David also tackles the issue of childhood obesity in her new documentary, Fed Up, co-produced with Katie Couric and slated for release on May 9th.

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Yes, Turmeric Is the Spice of the Moment (Here’s Why)

by in Healthy Tips, April 17, 2014

turmeric

Long a mainstay of South Asian cooking, turmeric adds zing to curries and other dishes. But it has also been used in Eastern cultures for thousands of years for its medicinal properties. More recently, turmeric has caught the attention of Western researchers who have been studying the herb and its potential health benefits.

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The Healthy Eats Q & A: Marcus Samuelsson

by in Chefs and Restaurants, April 7, 2014

marcus samuelsson
Born in Ethiopia, adopted by a Swedish family and raised in Sweden, Marcus Samuelsson comes to cooking with a unique background. He credits his Swedish grandmother, Helga, with first introducing him to the joys of the kitchen. He spent childhood summers at her side learning to pickle fresh vegetables, make meatballs and other Swedish delicacies. But as an adult, he returned to his native Ethiopia and learned about the culture’s cuisine and intricate spices.

In 2010, when he opened his restaurant Red Rooster Harlem in New York City, he described the menu as “American comfort food with hints of my Swedish and African roots.” Here, the chef — who has also made appearances on Iron Chef and Chopped – opens up about what goes on in his own kitchen.

What are your favorite healthy foods?
My favorites are definitely anything fresh and raw. Fruits and vegetables I pick up from the farmers market in the morning after a run are ideal, and there’s this guy that sells the best peaches in the summer.

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The Healthy Eats Q & A: Chef Geoffrey Zakarian

by in Chefs and Restaurants, March 24, 2014

Geoffrey Zakarian

For more than 30 years — starting with his first professional job at Le Cirque in 1982 — chef Geoffrey Zakarian has been cooking some of New York City’s finest food. He presides over the Modern American cuisine at The Lambs Club and The National, both in New York City, in addition to being a regular judge on Chopped and a co-host of The Kitchen. In 2011, he won the title of Iron Chef on the The Next Iron Chef. Here, he tackles some questions about his healthy eating habits.

What health food trend do you wish would go away?
Low-fat and fat-free. It robs the food of its flavor and richness. Just the eat the real thing, but eat less of it. I also hate the word “trend” when it comes to eating because health should be a daily lifestyle.

What must-have items are always in your kitchen?
Coconut water, Emmi yogurt, lots of mangoes and berries and canned Spanish tuna in olive oil. I use the tuna in salads and warm pasta dishes.

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The Healthy Eats Q & A: Chef Marc Murphy

by in Chefs and Restaurants, March 3, 2014

 

marc murphy

Chef Marc Murphy has devoted his career to creating innovative cuisine. He currently presides over five New York restaurants — two locations of Landmarc, a bistro with Italian influences, two locations of his New York-style fish shack, Ditch Plains, and his latest venture, Kingside, which features a New American menu. He’s also a regular judge on Chopped. Here, he opens up about some of his own eating habits — which include loving kale and french fries both.

What health-food trend would you like to see go away?
Week-long juice cleanses. I love a great juice, but I don’t think you should use it as a meal replacement every day. Everything in moderation.

What healthy items do you always have on hand in the kitchen, and how do you use them?
I always like to have some healthy grains like quinoa and farro around. At my newest restaurant Kingside, we just added a brick-roasted poussin with winter squash, farro and mustard greens, and it’s delicious!

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5 Foods Your Heart Loves (and 2 Foods It’s Totally Over)

by in Healthy Tips, February 14, 2014

oranges

Much attention is paid to the heart on Valentine’s Day, but maybe romance shouldn’t be the sole focus. Keeping the heart healthy is the best way to keep love alive — and diet is key to  heart health. Rachel Johnson, PhD, RD, professor of nutrition at University of Vermont and chair of the American Heart Association Nutrition Committee, shares the five most important foods to have in your diet’s rotation — plus the two most important to skip.

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5 Kitchen Skills Every Health-Loving Cook Should Learn

by in Healthy Tips, February 7, 2014

poached chicken
Even if you have no aspirations of becoming your generation’s Julia Child, knowing your way around the kitchen can make cooking easier, faster and more enjoyable. Learning a few key skills can mean the difference between a healthy home-cooked meal and yet another night of not-so-healthy take out. Libby Mills, RDN, a nutrition coach and chef, shares five techniques to try. With a little practice, you might be mistaken for Julia Child in the kitchen after all (just minus some of the butter).

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5 Shortcut Foods Nutrition Experts Love

by in Healthy Tips, January 27, 2014

spinach
True, cooking from scratch with the freshest ingredients is a surefire way to create a delicious and nutritious meal. But then there’s dinnertime reality: Getting home from work and needing to put a meal on the table in not a lot of time. Happily, not every store-bought item that makes it easier to prep dinner is overly processed or full of suspect ingredients. Here are some shortcut foods nutrition experts say they rely on when they’re in a hurry.

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Kale Juice as the Next Cocktail Mixer? (Yes, It’s Happening.)

by in Trends, January 20, 2014

green margarita
In signs that enthusiasm for juicing shows no signs of flagging, it now extends to those who like to indulge in the occasional cocktail. As the New York Times reported last month, hip bars are embracing the world of fresh fruit and vegetable juices — taking the same concoctions people use to re-energize after a workout or up their intake of leafy greens — and adding a shot of vodka, gin or tequila. Besides being pro-produce, health-minded booze buffs, it seems, are also drawn to the idea of mixers that preclude the usual sugary sodas and syrups.

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