All Posts By Sally Wadyka

Nuts About Seeds? From Chia to Flax and Hemp, What Seeds to Sow

by in Healthy Tips, October 13, 2014

Chia Seeds
Sure, they’ve been lurking on the shelves of health food stores for decades, but suddenly, it seems, seeds have been pushed into the limelight as the latest (and littlest!) superfoods. “Seeds give you a lot of nutritional bang for your buck,” says Alissa Rumsey, RD, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “You don’t need to use much in order to get a good dose of protein, fiber and other nutrients.” Here, the seeds to sow in your diet — and the all the good things you’ll reap when you do.

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Slim By Design: How to Change Your Environment (and your waistline)

by in Books, October 6, 2014

Slim By Design
Is your house making your fat? It’s possible that the urge to reach for a cookie instead of an apple or to dig into second and third helpings really isn’t our fault. According to food psychologist Brian Wansink, director of Cornell University’s Food and Brand Lab, our environment is the biggest predictor of whether or not we have healthy eating habits. He’s identified what he calls the “five zones” where most of our eating and food choices occur — home, favorite restaurants, workplace, grocery stores and our kids’ schools. In his new book, Slim by Design: Mindless Eating Solutions for Everyday Life (William Morrow), he explains how each affects us and how we can take more control.

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The Skinnytaste Cookbook: Light on Calories, Big on Flavor

by in Cookbooks, Uncategorized, October 2, 2014

Skinnytaste Cookbook Cover

What does skinny taste like? Just ask Gina Homolka. For six years, low-fat foodie Gina Homolka has been satisfying the tastebuds of a loyal following with her Skinnytaste blog. Her recipes reflect her own eating philosophy — delicious, healthy, seasonal dishes that also just so happen to be low in calories and fat. This month she debuts The Skinnytaste Cookbook: Light on Calories, Big on Flavor.
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Meet Nutritional Yeast (That’s “Nooch” For Short)

by in Trends, September 13, 2014

nutritional yeast
The name sounds strangely antiseptic, and the powdery flakes look suspiciously like what you’d sprinkle into the goldfish tank. But that does not deter certain cooks and bloggers (mostly vegetarian and vegan ones) from singing the praises of nutritional yeast. So what exactly is this supplement and what has it done to deserve a spot on the health food hot list? Read more

Free of Gluten and Dairy, But Always Full of Flavor

by in Cookbooks, September 8, 2014

deep-dish pizza
When Silvana Nardone’s son Isaiah was ten, he was diagnosed with an allergy to gluten and dairy. His first reaction was, “What am I going to eat?” But lucky for him, his mom was more than up to the challenge. “He told me the one thing he really wanted to be able to eat was cornbread, so I spent the next two months trying — and failing — to mimic the exact taste and texture of gluten-full cornbread,” says Nardone, who is also a contributor to Healthy Eats. Eventually, she nailed it and was inspired to keep finding ways to make Isaiah gluten- and dairy-free versions of all his favorite foods. In her latest cookbook, Silvana’s Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free Kitchen, she shares what she has learned. Read more

10 Health Foods We’re All Saying the Wrong Way (Kefir, Anyone?)

by in Healthy Tips, August 18, 2014

kefir

It’s a cruel fact: Many of the foods that are potentially good for us also have names seemingly designed to trip us up. Who among us did not have the red-in-the-face moment of learning that quinoa wasn’t pronounced “kee-noah”? To spare us all future embarrassment in the aisles of the Health Food Hut, here’s a guide to several food words known to cause verbal stumbles.

Acai
What it is: This dark purple berry is now ubiquitous in health-food store products everywhere, thanks to its reputed superfood powers. It’s a storehouse of antioxidants and may help support the immune system.
How to say it: You’ll sound like a pro at the smoothie shack when you ask to have “ah-sah-EE” added to the mix.

Agar (also, Agar-Agar)
What it is: This gelatinous substance is derived from red algae and used as a thickener and gelling agent in foods like puddings, jelly candies, soups and sauces. Because it comes from a plant (unlike gelatin, which is derived from animals), it’s popular with vegetarians and vegans who can’t resist a good pudding.
How to say it: It’s pronounced “AH-ger,” which, beer lovers will note, rhymes with lager.

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How Your Co-Workers (and Everyone Else) Influence Your Weight

by in Books, July 17, 2014

thinfluence cover
Research in recent years has made it clear that losing weight and getting healthy isn’t something that happens in a vacuum. One study that garnered numerous headlines several years back found that a person’s chance of becoming obese increases by 57 percent if a close friend is obese, 40 percent if a sibling is obese, and 37 percent is their spouse is obese. That’s some hefty (pun intended) pressure on your social circles.

But Harvard professors Walter Willett, MD, and Malissa Wood, MD, have taken the research several steps further. Their new book Thinfluence examines how friends, family, colleagues, online communities and the environment exert influence over your health behaviors — and how you can make them work in your favor. Here, Dr. Wood talks about what it takes to stay on track.

Who exerts the biggest influence over your behaviors and why?
For most people, it’s whoever you spend the most time with. And that often ends up being your co-workers. You might spend more time with them than you do your family and eat more meals at work than you do at home.

What are some ways these people can negatively — or positively — influence your own behaviors and choices?
The influences can be very powerful. If you work with a group of people who like to go out and eat unhealthy food every day for lunch or always order in pizza when you’re working late, those decisions will shape your behavior. But, for example, I’m lucky enough to work with several women who all decided to make some efforts to get healthier by eating better and exercising more. I spend all day with these people, so that has had a very positive effect. Read more

The Beauty of Smoothie Bowls (Yes, They’re Smoothies—in Bowls)

by in Trends, June 23, 2014

smoothie bowl
It’s the new smoothie dilemma: Straw or spoon? Just when you thought the world of liquid meals was complete, along comes something new. The latest trend in purified food: Smoothie bowls. That’s right, these are smoothies, but you eat them out of a bowl. Before you write off this craze as just as change of scenery for your smoothie, there are, apparently, a few key distinctions between an old-style smoothie you drink and the newer, smoothie-in-a-bowl versions.

Besides the obvious difference in how you consume it, smoothie bowls provide the opportunity to get even more creative with liquefied creations. Because smoothie bowls don’t have to be slurped through a straw, cooks have the option to make the concoction as thick as they want — blending in ingredients like seeds, frozen bananas, nut butters or even avocado for added heft and texture.

“Smoothie bowls are essentially more nutrient-dense smoothies, thick enough to eat with a spoon and often topped with fruits, nuts, seeds, muesli or granola,” explains McKel Hill, MS, RD, and creator of the plant-based, whole foods blog Nutrition Stripped. “Think of smoothie bowls as the new cereal — like cereal 2.0.”

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Is Soylent the Future of Food?

by in Trends, June 16, 2014

soylent
Technically, Soylent isn’t really a food at all. It’s a drink mix designed to replace actual food in order to make your diet easier, cheaper and more convenient. Soylent was created by a 25-year-old software engineer named Rob Rhinehart, as a solution, in part, to his own dilemma. The entrepreneur was on a tight budget, which meant subsisting on a steady diet of ramen noodles, fast food and frozen burritos. In search of something healthier but even cheaper, he started researching nutrients and eventually came up with this concoction of protein, carbs, fats, fiber, vitamins and minerals. Read more

Beyond Chicken Nuggets: When Kids Eat Out, Can They Eat Well?

by in Dining Out, June 11, 2014

kids' plate

With their steady rotation of grilled cheese and butter-topped noodles, the “kid-friendly” section of restaurant menus has always been unimaginative. But these days it’s hard not to notice that the offerings are also fairly unhealthy. The palette of food geared toward children is primarily white, brown and orange — the colors of french fries, fried nuggets (of one sort or another) and mac and cheese. Not only is such fare typically lacking in creativity, it’s also lacking in nutrition, although there’s generally no lack of calories or sodium. It’s not uncommon for a kid’s meal to exceed 1,000 calories, more than any adult needs in one sitting.

The good news is that many restaurants are making strides in revamping the menu options for pint-sized patrons. The National Restaurant Association just hosted the second annual Kids LiveWell Recipe Challenge — a competition that encourages chefs to come up with enticing but healthy alternatives for kids. Winners included an organic sunflower butter and jam sandwich on multi-grain oat bread and a whole-wheat quesadilla filled with broccoli, chicken, peppers and corn. Read more