All Posts By Kerri-Ann Jennings, M.S., R.D.

Kerri-Ann Jennings, M.S., R.D.

Have You Tried Teff?

by in Gluten-Free, Have You Tried, Uncategorized, September 1, 2016

You know you should get a variety of whole grains in your diet. But it’s easy to get stuck in a quinoa rut if you don’t make an effort to seek out new-to-you whole grains. This article tells you everything you need to know about teff, a tiny whole grain that’s popular in Ethiopian cuisine.

What Is It?

Teff is a small, gluten-free grain, about the size of a poppy seed. It comes in different colors and has a mild, nutty flavor. It’s a staple grain in Ethiopia, where it’s ground into flour to make injera, a spongy, pancake-like fermented bread.

What Are Its Nutritional Benefits?

Teff is a really nutritious whole grain. A cup of cooked teff has 7 grams of fiber, 10 grams of protein and the following vitamins and minerals:

Magnesium, 32% DV
Thiamine, 31% DV
Phosphorus, 30% DV
Iron, 28% DV Read more

Why You Need Iron

by in Food & Nutrition Experts, August 2, 2016

Iron is a mineral that’s a building block of proteins and enzymes. It’s essential for many functions, including moving oxygen around the body. Yet many people have iron deficiency. Find out what iron is, how much you need and why the right amount is important.

What Is Iron?
Iron is the most-abundant mineral on earth. In humans, 70 percent of iron is found in red blood cells as part of hemoglobin and in muscle cells as myoglobin. Hemoglobin shuttles oxygen around the body, whereas myoglobin receives the oxygen and brings it to energy-producing mitochondria.

The Two Kinds of Iron
There are two kinds of iron: heme and nonheme. Heme is more easily absorbed by the body, but it’s found only in animal foods, including meat, poultry and fish — it makes up about half of the iron in those foods; the other half is nonheme. Nonheme iron is also found in eggs and plant-based foods, including beans, dried fruits, some vegetables and fortified foods.

How Much Iron Do You Need?
The recommended daily allowance is 8 milligrams per day for men and postmenopausal women, 18 milligrams per day for premenopausal women and 27 milligrams per day for pregnant women. Read more

Is There Any Health Benefit to Enhanced Waters?

by in Food & Nutrition Experts, June 5, 2016

You know it’s important to drink plenty of water. Not only does this naturally zero-calorie beverage help hydrate the 60 percent of you that is water, but it’s vital for keeping your energy levels up and your organs in working order. But are there any added benefits to the enhanced waters on the market? Let’s take a look.

Alkaline Water/Ionized Water
Alkaline water refers to water that has a higher pH than regular or filtered tap water. It can be naturally alkaline (such as most mineral waters) or created by using an ionizer. Advocates of alkaline water say the typical Western diet makes our bodies acidic and that drinking alkaline water is one way to get your body to an optimum pH. Some studies have supported a benefit to alkaline water. A 2009 study out of Switzerland suggested drinking alkaline mineral water could help preserve bone density. These ideas are intriguing, but the body of research is pretty small at this point, so take it with a grain of salt. Read more

Farmers’ Market Finds: Scapes and Rabes, Beyond Broccoli and Garlic

by in Farmers' Market Finds, May 28, 2016

If you haunt your farmers market looking for signs of spring, you’re probably familiar with garlic scapes and broccoli rabe…they’re some of the first greens you’ll find. But scapes and rabe come in more varieties than garlic and broccoli. Here’s the skinny on what they are and what other varieties to look for.

 

What Are Scapes?

These shoots are one of the first edible greens to crop up in spring. Scapes are simply flower stalks that grow out of the bulbs of garlic, onions and leeks. At the top of each is a bulb that will flower if left unplucked. For eating, though, scapes are picked when the green stalk is sturdy and the bulb is still a bulb. Scapes taste like the alliums they grow from, and you can use them in places you would use chopped onion.

 

How to Use Scapes

To cook scapes, remove the bulbs and use the stalks. Chop them finely and saute to soften. Add them to omelets or quiche, blitz them into a pesto or preserve them by pickling. Read more

Now Trending: Crazy-Creative Mayonnaise Flavors

by in Grocery Shopping, April 15, 2016

Alert! Crazy mayos are sweeping the nation. Everyone from small artisanal operations to the daddy of all mayos, Hellmann’s, has gotten in the game, disrupting the basic emulsification of eggs and oil with wacky flavorings. No longer do you have to wonder how to spice up a turkey sandwich on whole wheat.

Read more

Fresh vs. Canned vs. Frozen: What’s the Best Produce to Buy?

by in Grocery Shopping, April 1, 2016

Spring is finally here! And with it, fresh, locally grown produce is starting to return to farmers markets that have peddled root vegetables all winter. But how do frozen and canned rank? Are they always inferior to the fresh stuff? Let’s break it down.

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Why You Should Be Eating Potatoes

by in Healthy Recipes, March 17, 2016

Depending on whom you talk to, potatoes are either a bad-for-you “white food” or a healthy starch to include in your diet. Which is it?

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13 Morning Hacks for Your Breakfast

by in Healthy Tips, February 20, 2016

If breakfast is the most-important meal of the day, and mornings are the most-hectic time of the day, how do you make a morning meal that’s healthy and timesaving? That conundrum led us to compile our favorite morning hacks.

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The Healthy Breakfast You Can Make from Leftovers

by in Healthy Recipes, February 9, 2016

Oatmeal is a great way to get heart-healthy whole grains into your breakfast, but it’s not the only way. With a little prep work, you can turn lots of whole grains into a morning meal — from quinoa and brown rice to millet and polenta. Try this easy, versatile, DIY recipe to make a healthy, hot breakfast in minutes.

This recipe uses leftover cooked grains from your fridge. If you don’t have any… get on that! Keeping a big batch of cooked whole grains in the fridge is a timesaving step for lots of healthy meals.

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Trending! Sweet Heat for Your Sweetheart

by in Food News & Trends, February 7, 2016

Move over, sweet and salty; hello, sweet heat. This flavor combo that gives a subtle (and sometimes not-so-subtle) burn to sweet foods has been steadily gaining traction. And it’s moving far beyond chile chocolate and jalapeno margaritas. This Valentine’s Day, check out some of the latest offerings to sport the sweet-hot flavor combo.

Here’s where we’ve spotted it:
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