All Posts By Katie Cavuto-Boyle

Win Driscoll’s Berries!

by in Giveaway, July 11, 2012

raspberries
Nothing beats a bowl full of fresh strawberries in the summer! Sure, their sweet, sometimes tart flavor plucked from the pack and popped into your mouth is the perfect summer treat but they can be used in a variety of recipes and are oh-so-good for you!  Packed with vitamin C and antioxidants, berries have disease-fighting power as well as other health benefits.

Try one of these creative recipes and add more berries to your diet:

Quinoa Pilaf with Driscoll’s® Raspberries
Raspberry and Blueberry Kale Salad with Driscoll’s® Berries
Mixed Berry Cobbler
Mixed Berries with Limoncello

We’re giving away $50 worth of Driscoll’s berries; just let us know, in the comments, your favorite way to eat summer berries.  The contest starts at 10:00 a.m. EST today, and ends on Friday, July 13 at 5 p.m. EST.

We’re giving away a $50 coupon good for Driscoll’s berries to one lucky, randomly-selected commenter. You must include your email address in the “Email” field when submitting your comment so we can communicate with you if you’re a winner.

You may only comment once to be considered and you don’t have to purchase anything to win; a purchase will not increase your chances of winning. Odds depend on total number of entries. Void where prohibited. Only open to legal residents of 50 U.S. states, D.C. or Puerto Rico, and you must be at least 18 to win. For the first day of the giveaway, all entries (answers) must be entered between 10:00 a.m. EST on July 3 and 5 p.m. EST on July 5, 2012. Subject to full official rules. By leaving a comment on the blog, you acknowledge your acceptance to the Official Rules. ARV of each prize: $50.00. Sponsor: Scripps Networks, LLC, d/b/a Food Network, 9721 Sherrill Blvd, Knoxville, TN 37932.

So tell us, how do you eat strawberries, blueberries and raspberries? 

Cooking with Tea

by in Uncategorized, June 24, 2012
mint tea
Tea -- it's for more than sipping.

A few weeks back we talked about the different types of teas and why they are so good for you. This week I wanted to expand on the topic because believe it or not, you can do more with tea than just drink it. Tea is a hot new trend in the cooking world and adding tea to a recipe is a perfectly healthy way to cook.

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What’s Nutritional Yeast?

by in Uncategorized, June 2, 2012
nutritional yeast
Have you tried nutritional yeast?

Nutritional yeast is a source of great mystery for most people. Isn’t yeast what makes bread rise? And beer ferment? Yes, but nutritional yeast is quite different. It’s non-active yeast that has been grown (usually on glucose or another simple sugar), deactivated by heat, then dried, pasteurized and eventually sold in your neighborhood health food store. You may see it commercially as flakes for a yellowish powder (looks like cornmeal). Some cook with it but it is also popular as a condiment. So what’s the hype?

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How To Grow Herbs: Indoors and Outdoors

by in Uncategorized, May 27, 2012
herbs
Want to grow your own?

The right herb can really make a recipe. Whether it brings brightness to a beverage or spice to a saute, herbs are invaluable, flavorful, add-ins when it comes to healthy cooking. With the warm months upon us, growing your own herbs is a great idea. Not only is it a low-cost hobby (which can save you money on high-cost ingredients), but also brings the season’s freshest flavors right to your windowsill.

But how does a novice grower begin?  There are so many things to consider—what to grow, how much light, water, and soil, which pots and plant food.

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Tea 101

by in Uncategorized, May 7, 2012
tea
Which tea is your favorite?

Tea is the second most popular beverage around the world, eclipsed only by water. In general, tea refers to dried leaves of the camellia sinensis plant prepared by steeping in hot water. It can be served hot or cold. In the United States, 85 percent of the tea consumed is iced, a uniquely American preference. One pound of tea leaves yields about 200 cups, making tea one of the cheapest beverages available, following tap water.

The camellia sinensis plant is grown at high altitudes in damp, tropical regions. Tea, like wine, is named for its place of origin, such as Darjeeling, Ceylon (now known as Sri Lanka) and Assam.

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Eat Your Greens

by in Uncategorized, April 20, 2012
greens
Eat more greens!

After a recent trip to Whole Foods I found myself mesmerized by an educational poster in the elevator on the power of greens. Whole Foods uses the “ANDI” (Aggregate Nutrient Density Index) to showcase healthy food options in their store and this particular poster was emphasizing the nutrient density of several varieties of greens.  I loved the fact that the poster highlighted some less-common greens, ones that rarely become make it to the average household’s dinner table. So I’d like to elaborate the poster and teach you a bit more about some well-known and lesser known greens that will do your body good.

Collard greens (ANDI score=1000) Out of all the greens in the cabbage family, collards have the greatest cholesterol-lowering abilities. They also have amazing anti-cancer properties, are packed with Vitamin C, soluble fiber and many other vitamins and minerals.  Try sauteing them with a little olive oil, onions and garlic. They make the healthiest side dish out there!

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Nutrient Rating Systems

by in Uncategorized, April 15, 2012
guiding stars
Have you seen foods rated with the Guiding Stars rating in your grocery store?

With thousands of food choices at your local store it can be difficult to know if you are choosing foods that are truly good for you. In recent years there have been several types of nutrient rating systems derived to help you make better choices — but have you found yourself asking whether or not they are actually helpful? Find out what all those numbers really mean.

Glycemic Index: Measures how quickly food is metabolized into glucose when digested. The G.I. also estimates how much each gram of available carbohydrate (this equals total carbohydrates minus fiber, which is non-digestible) in a food raises a person’s blood glucose level following consumption of the food.

Examples: Glucose has a glycemic index of 100; all other foods have lower glycemic indexes.

Pros: Helpful for diabetics and those counting carbs.

Cons: Not as informative regarding fats and proteins.

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Better Food Choices: Making the Switch

by in Uncategorized, March 18, 2012
grocery bag
Start making healthier choices today.

Healthy eating can be defined in many ways and has different meanings for different people. But at the end of the day it’s about making small, simple, upgrades to your current diet to improve your overall health. That doesn’t mean you have to toss all the processed foods in your pantry today or say good-bye to your favorite sweets forever. It means starting where you are and using these tips to make healthier food choices moving forward.

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Food Labeling 101: Understanding Label Claims

by in Grocery Shopping, March 4, 2012
grocery shopping
Are you confused by label claims? You're not alone.

The supermarket aisles are flooded with health claims from “healthy, all-natural” frozen dinners to “cholesterol-lowering” granola bars. We’re constantly getting conflicting messages on what to what to eat — from organic produce to free-range or grass-fed meat — and what to avoid — from trans fats to high fructose corn syrup. It’s not surprising that most consumers are left wondering what to believe and what it all means.

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Food Labeling 101: Understanding the Nutrition Facts Label

by in Grocery Shopping, February 25, 2012

nutritional label
For a long time, I was that person awkwardly standing in the middle of a supermarket aisle staring at the myriad of cereals wondering which was right for me. But the reality is the Nutrition Facts label on the back of each box provides me with all the information I need to choose the cereal that best fits my diet. I have found that many of my clients choose one section of the food label such as calories or total fat, and they base their food choices off that number. But it’s important to understand the whole label and realize that it’s a wonderful tool you can use to investigate exactly what each product contains and which product is the best choice. Remember, real, whole  foods like fruits and vegetables are always the best bet. But when it comes to convenience foods, the food label and especially the ingredient list is the perfect guide to help you make better choices.

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