All Posts By Food Network Magazine

Salad Bar Face-Off: Which Is Healthier?

by in Which is Healthier?, March 27, 2014

Before you hit the salad bar, see how some popular ingredients compare.

Italian Dressing vs. Balsamic Vinaigrette
WINNER: Balsamic vinaigrette. Balsamic vinaigrette can contain a third fewer calories and grams of fat than Italian dressing. Bottled versions of both are often made with additives and preservatives, so mix your own: Combine three parts olive oil with one part balsamic vinegar and a little salt and pepper.

Spinach vs. Spring Mix
WINNER: Spinach. 
It’s a close call — both are super low in calories and packed with nutrients. Spinach contains slightly more phytonutrients, antioxidants, B vitamins, potassium, calcium and iron. Spring mix usually contains spinach, but it’s bulked up with lighter lettuces like frisee that don’t offer much in terms of nutrition.

 

 

Cheddar vs. Feta
WINNER: Feta. Cheddar has 32 percent more protein and 49 percent less sodium than feta. But feta has fewer calories and grams of fat (total and saturated) than cheddar and because it’s so creamy and flavorful, a little goes a long way.

 

 

Grilled Chicken Breast vs. Diced Turkey
WINNER: Grilled chicken breast. Sodium is the big issue here: Diced turkey is more likely to be processed and loaded with sodium — up to 16 times the amount in store-bought or restaurant-cooked chicken breasts. Also, chicken breast is white meat, while diced turkey can contain a mix of light and fattier dark meat.

 

 

Croutons vs. Tortilla Strips
WINNER: Croutons. Croutons are usually much lower in fat because they’re sauteed or baked rather than deep-fried like tortilla strips. The exception? If you see croutons labeled “cheesy” (as opposed to plain), beware: The added cheese makes them almost as fatty as tortilla strips.

 

 

Food Network Magazine’s expert Jaclyn London is a registered dietitian in New York City.

 

Giada’s 5 Stay-Fit Strategies

by in Healthy Tips, January 18, 2014

She skips the gym!

Giada is definitely fit, but not from running. “The idea of being strapped to a treadmill every day is my worst nightmare,” she says. She takes walks on the beach, does an hour of yoga most mornings and paddleboards in the Pacific Ocean with her husband, Todd.

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Giada’s Chia Seed Breakfast Pudding

by in Healthy Recipes, January 15, 2014

Right after she wakes up, Giada De Laurentiis drinks two glasses of warm water with lemon. She does an hour of yoga, then eats a protein-rich breakfast, like this Chia Seed Pudding. “You don’t need to eat a lot,” she says. “It’s very substantial.”

Chia seeds are packed with fiber, protein and antioxidants. Look for them at health-food stores.

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Why You Should Give Pale Veggies a Chance

by in Food News, September 19, 2013

white veggies

Health experts keep telling us to eat the rainbow, but according to one recent report, we should be eating more pale produce: Mushrooms, parsnips, onions, cauliflower and potatoes are surprisingly rich in fiber, magnesium and other nutrients. “A potato actually has more potassium than a banana,” says the paper’s author, Purdue University professor Connie Weaver. Another plus: Potatoes provide one of the best nutritional values per penny in the produce aisle—assuming, of course, that you don’t undo all of the good with a deep fryer.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

Coffee Shop Face-Off: Which is Healthier?

by in Is It Healthy?, September 16, 2013

latte

Before you stop for your morning joe, find out how some coffee shop favorites compare.

Latte vs Cappuccino
WINNER: Cappuccino. They deliver the same caffeine jolt (75 milligrams per 12-ounce cup), but a latte has almost double the calories and fat of a cappuccino. The difference is in how they’re made: Lattes are almost entirely milk, while cappuccinos have equal parts milk and steamed foam.

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Candy Shop Face-Off: Which is Healthier?

by in Which is Healthier?, July 24, 2013

red licorice

Pay attention when you hit those touristy candy shops this summer: Some treats are better than others.

Red Licorice vs. Black Licorice
WINNER: Red licorice. Many people assume that black licorice root can alleviate health issues. This hasn’t been proven, but eating large quantities of black licorice may be dangerous to people 40 and older because a compound in it has been linked to heart problems, according to the FDA.

boardwalk taffyBoardwalk Fudge vs. Boardwalk Taffy
WINNER: Boardwalk taffy. A 1-inch square of chocolate fudge has more than double the fat of the equivalent amount of taffy (about seven pieces). Plus, fudge is higher in saturated fat, which can raise cholesterol in the bloodstream and lead to heart problems.

 

sour gummiesClassic Gummies vs. Sour Gummies
WINNER: Classic gummies. The calorie and sugar counts are almost identical, but studies suggest that sour candy erodes tooth enamel more than other types because it’s more acidic. And because gummies stick to your teeth longer than other sweets, sour ones pose a greater risk of dental damage.

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Mexican Food Face-Off: Which is Healthier?

by in Which is Healthier?, June 2, 2013

Red Sangria

Food Network Magazine compared some fiesta favorites — did your Mexican-food favorites come out on top?

Red Sangria vs. White Sangria
WINNER: Red sangria. Red wine is loaded with resveratrol, a compound in the skin of grapes that is thought to be good for the heart. White wine has none of this, plus many white sangria recipes call for fruit juice and sweet liquors, so they typically end up with higher sugar counts.

Yellow Corn Chips
Yellow Corn Tortilla Chips vs. Blue Corn Tortilla Chips
WINNER: It’s a draw. Blue corn chips are often labeled as all natural, so people assume they’re the better choice. But the FDA doesn’t regulate the use of that term. In fact, the two varieties have the same number of calories and grams of fat. And because most of the sodium is added, the health factor depends more on the brand than on the color.

 

Mexican Cheese Blend
Cotija Cheese vs. Mexican Cheese Blend
WINNER: Mexican cheese blend. Ounce for ounce, these taco toppings have the same number of calories (about 100) and similar levels of fat and protein. But cotija cheese has three times as much sodium, giving Mexican cheese blend the edge.

 

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Holiday Face-Off: Which is Healthier?

by in Healthy Holidays, December 14, 2012

bleached flour
Food Network Magazine staged a holiday face-off and asked a registered dietitian to name the better choices. Before you bake your holiday faves, see how these staples stack up.

Bleached Flour vs. Unbleached Flour
WINNER: It’s a draw. The less processed version isn’t always the better pick: Unbleached and bleached flour have identical calorie, fiber and protein counts. The FDA regulates the ingredients used to whiten flour, so they’re only added in safe amounts. But if you’re worried about eating something with the word “bleach” on the label anyway, go the unbleached route.

RaisinsRaisins vs Dried Cranberries
WINNER: Raisins. Raisins and dried cranberries have similar amounts of sugar, but all of the sugar in raisins comes from what’s naturally present in grapes, while more than half of the calories in dried cranberries can come from sweeteners that manufacturers add to make them taste less tart.

 

 

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Thanksgiving Face-Off: Which is Healthier?

by in Thanksgiving, November 15, 2012

apple cider

Food Network Magazine staged a Thanksgiving face-off and asked a registered dietitian to name the better choices. Study up before the big meal: Here’s how some staples compare.

Apple Cider vs. Sparkling Cider
WINNER: Apple cider. Sparkling cider is usually sparkling apple juice, which doesn’t contain the same amount of fiber that unfiltered ciders do (the real stuff is a little cloudy). Plus, the spices that make cider so delicious, like cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves, give you an antioxidant boost.

dark meatDark Meat vs. White Meat
WINNER: It’s a draw. White meat contains half the fat of drumsticks and thighs and fewer calories, but dark meat has more iron and twice as much zinc. And a new study suggests that the taurine in dark meat might help prevent heart disease.

 

pie crustRolled Piecrust vs. Graham Cracker Piecrust
WINNER: Graham cracker piecrust. Recipes for rolled piecrusts typically call for a lot of butter and sometimes lard, so they are high in saturated fat. Graham cracker crusts are lower in fat and calories, and they contain some extra fiber.

 

 

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Breakfast Face-Off: Which is Healthier?

by in Which is Healthier?, September 19, 2012

cow's milk

Food Network Magazine staged a breakfast face-off and asked a registered dietitian to name the better choices. The results might surprise you.

Cow’s Milk vs. Soy Milk
WINNER: Cow’s milk. To make soy milk taste better, many manufacturers add sugar (especially to flavored kinds). Plus, soy milk doesn’t naturally contain as much protein or calcium as cow’s milk. Soy milk can be a healthful alternative if it’s fortified and doesn’t have too much added sugar, but unless you’re lactose intolerant, just stick with 1 percent or skim milk.

peanut butter

Smooth Peanut Butter vs. Chunky Peanut Butter
WINNER: It’s a draw. The amount of salt, sugar and oil in peanut butter can vary by brand and even within each brand, but smooth and crunchy versions are the same nutritionally—one is just ground more than the other. The healthiest option: peanut butter without added sugar or salt.

 

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