All Posts By Dana Angelo White

Nutrition News: EWG Exposes Sugary Cereals

by in Food News & Trends, December 7, 2011

cereal
I’m always warning parents about the amount of sugar lurking in their kids’ favorite breakfast cereals. Even brands that market themselves as whole-grain-filled, healthy choices rank up there with candy. Our friends at Environmental Working Group (EWG) are weighing in with some shocking facts. Are you serving your kids dessert for breakfast?

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12 Days of Holiday Gifts: Infused Vodka

by in Healthy Holidays, December 5, 2011

flavored vodka
Trying to keep alcohol consumption modest this holiday season? Make the most of your celebratory sips with these sweet, tangy, spicy and even herbaceous homemade vodka infusions.

Smart Sipping
Spiking vodka with seasonal flavors makes a festive and creative gift.  A 1.5 fluid ounce “shot” of vodka contains about 100 calories and most infusions add no additional calories. Those made with sugar will add 15 calories per teaspoon.

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Have You Tried: Goat Cheese?

by in Have You Tried, November 30, 2011
goat cheese
Goat cheese: Have you tried it?

Goat cheese is tangy and full of flavor, yet some folks shy away from this creamy delight. Give it a try; you won’t want to miss out on this wonderfully versatile cheese.

What is Goat Cheese?
Also known as “chevre” (French for goat), goat cheese has a distinct tangy flavor. Made from (you guessed it) goat’s milk, it’s available in soft, semi-soft and firm varieties. Check labels when you can; some brands are made from a mixture of both goat and cows milk.

Some might consider it an acquired taste but the tangy bite and super creamy texture of goat cheese lends itself to all kinds of foods. Enjoy cold and crumbled over a salad or smooth and melty on a burger. Commonly shaped into logs or rounds, you might also find this delicate cheese rolled in herbs or spices – great for spreading on crackers.

Store fresh goat cheese in the refrigerator, wrapped in plastic for up to 2 weeks.

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Order This, Not That: Mall Foods

by in Dining Out, November 26, 2011

mall food court
‘Tis the season for holiday shopping but don’t let a hectic trip to the mall lead to a Santa-like physique. Use our tips for more figure-friendly shopping snacks.

Order: Fresh and Light
When it comes to tackling the food court, most malls offer the usual suspects of the fast food world. Use our guides make the smartest choices at McDonald’s, Burger King, Taco Bell, Subway and Wendy’s.

A salad with vinaigrette dressing (on the side) or a small cup of soup are usually the most sensible options. Check your local mall’s website ahead of time to see which chain restaurants they feature, then download the nutrition info from the company’s website.

Not: Buttery and Sugary
While the smell of butter-drenched pretzels and over-sized chocolate chip cookies are calling out to you, these classic mall goodies can pack in more than 350 calories each. That pretzel also contains more than 40% of the daily recommended amount of sodium, while the cookie boasts 17 grams of total fat and 8 grams of saturated fat. The show-stopper just might be the ooey-gooey cinnamon bun, coming it a holiday-wrecking 880 calories and 36 grams of fat each!

Think sipping on a smoothie or festive coffee drink is better? Think again. A medium-sized smoothie or whipped cream-topped gingerbread latte will also pack in more than 300 sugar-filled calories.

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Thanksgiving Leftovers: Soup’s On!

by in 5-Ingredient Recipes, November 25, 2011
turkey stock
Make a homeade stock out of your Thanksgiving leftovers and turn it into 3 easy soups.

You can only heat up a plate of gravy-drenched turkey dinner leftovers so many times! Go a little lighter with your Thanksgiving memories by making any of these 3 easy and tasty soups. They all start out with a fresh pot of stock made with stuff you’ve got lying around the kitchen.

Turkey Stock
Don’t toss out the remnants of your turkey! Go the extra mile and turn it into an amazingly delicious stock. A large pot, some water and vegetable scraps (you’ve definitely got those around) and you’re set. Let it simmer away while the family settles into a cozy food coma.

Basic Turkey Stock
Makes 2 quarts

1 roasted turkey carcass (from a 10-pound turkey)
2 pounds raw vegetable scraps (carrots, celery, onions, leeks and garlic recommended)
1 tablespoon kosher salt
2 teaspoons black peppercorns
2 bay leaves
Water

Combine ingredients in a large stockpot and add enough cold water to cover. Bring to a slow boil, reduce to a simmer and cook uncovered for 2 to 3 hours. Strain and transfer to quart containers. Store in the refrigerator for up to 1 week or in the freezer for up to 6 months.

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Foods to Freeze

by in Healthy Tips, November 20, 2011

freezer
Utilizing your freezer can mean big savings of time and money. Are you down with chilling?

Freezer
The biggest freezer mistake people make is not keeping the freezer set to the proper temperature. If it’s too warm in there you’ll get transferring odors, freezer burn, and foul tasting food. Invest in a freezer thermometer and make sure it says an icy zero degrees in there.

All that opening and closing of the door can cause shifts in temperature. For this reason be sure to place foods in the appropriate spot. If you aren’t going to be reaching for it for a while, keep it in the back of the freezer. Frequently used items can go closer to the front or in the door.

Pointers for keeping your freezer spic and span include: wiping down shelving with a damp rag to keep it free of dust and debris and placing a box of baking soda in every 3 months to help absorb odors. See ice building up? If so, it’s time to defrost! Check the manufacturers directions for details on how.

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Make Your Own Biscuits

by in Healthy Recipes, November 19, 2011
biscuits
Here's one for the bread basket: homemade biscuits, portioned right.

Store-bought biscuit dough is full of hydrogenated oils (a.k.a. trans fats) but homemade biscuit recipes call for large servings of shortening or butter. We aren’t revolutionizing the biscuit, just making them in a more portion-conscious way.

Better Biscuits
Most recipe yields are for 8 to 10 pieces, which means a 300-plus calorie bread to go along with your meal. Below is a traditional biscuit recipe portioned out to keep the calories in check.

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Burning Off High Calorie Foods: Thanksgiving Edition

by in Uncategorized, November 15, 2011

women running
It probably comes as no surprise that a Thanksgiving meal can pack in tons of extra calories. What’s really eye-opening is how much exercise you need to burn those calories. Don’t get us wrong, Thanksgiving dinner is a meal to be savored; just keep some of these numbers in mind before you pile those goodies too high in your plate.

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Nutrient to Know: Zinc

by in Uncategorized, November 14, 2011
oysters
Zinc is found in oysters, but if you're not a fan, there are plenty of other food sources.

You may have heard of this trace mineral but do you know how important it is to your health? Get the facts about zinc.

What is it?
Zinc is plentiful in foods like oysters, beef, pork and chicken, but it can also be found in nuts, yogurt and beans.

Zinc supplements are often taken to boost immunity and fight symptoms of the common cold. While there’s a small amount of research to support that zinc lozenges might decrease the duration of a cold, their effectiveness is not well established.

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5 One-Pot Meals

by in Uncategorized, November 12, 2011
squash stew
Food Network Magazine's Slow Cooker Squash Stew

With the cooler weather settling in, it’s time to get cozy in the kitchen. Snuggle up with these healthy meals that will dirty fewer dishes.

Slow Cooker
A seasonal vegetarian feast straight from the slow cooker.
Recipe: Slow Cooker Squash Stew

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