All Posts By Dana Angelo White

Tips for Feeding Healthy and Happy Kids: An Interview with Ellyn Satter

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, Kid-Friendly, June 6, 2012

ellyn satter If the struggle to get your kids to eat right is driving you nuts, there’s hope! We asked registered dietitian and (my all-time-favorite) child nutrition expert Ellyn Satter to weigh in.

Q: Why do so many parents have trouble feeding their kids? A: Because they care so much. Parents have been brainwashed about what is good and bad nutrition-wise and feel pressured to produce a healthy child.

The most important thing is the family meal. The parents’ job is to help preserve a positive attitude about eating.  It almost doesn’t matter what you’re eating as long as it’s together. Once parents can establish structure and rhythm to getting meals on the table, creativity will start to kick in and deciding what to serve gets easier.

Q: When it comes to feeding kids, what’s the biggest mistake parents make? A: Parents often provide too little support and too much interference – insisting and bribery don’t work. You can’t fool a child. Parents need to trust that the child will learn to make smart decisions when it comes to what they eat. Read more

Nutrient to Know: Vitamin B12

by in Uncategorized, June 5, 2012
milk
Milk: there's vitamin B 12 in there.

There are a lot of misconceptions about this vitamin. Get the facts about B-12.

What is it?
Less commonly known as “cobalamin” this water-soluble vitamin is almost always found in multi-vitamins and B-complex supplements. Unlike most other water-soluble vitaminss, B-12 requires stomach acid for absorption. It’s also stored within the body for many years, unlike others like riboflavin and thiamin that are quickly passed in the urine.

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Market Watch: Spring Broccoli

by in In Season, June 3, 2012

spring broccoli
Broccoli is usually found later in the summer, some varieties of this vitamin-packed veggie can be found the markets now.

Bright green and full of goodness, one cup dishes up 30 calories, 2 grams of fiber, 3 grams of protein and more than a day’s worth of vitamins C and K. The varieties you’ll find at the farmers’ market are sweet and more tender than anything at the grocery store. What ever you do – please EAT THE STALKS, they are packed with nutrients and way too delicious to throw away.

Recipes to Try:
Broccoli Salad
Broccoli, Mushroom and Cheese Breakfast Strata
Creamy Broccoli Slaw
Chicken and Broccoli Stir Fry
Roasted Broccoli

What to Eat and Drink for a Better Night’s Sleep

by in Healthy Tips, June 1, 2012
swiss cheese
Food that are high in calcium, like cheese, can help you sleep.

Craving more zzzz’s? Some of the things you eat and drink can help you get more rest, others can work against you.

What You Eat

Green Light

  • Going to bed hungry is a big no-no for relaxation; have a light snack to help you unwind.
  • Both calcium and carbohydrate-rich foods promote the effects of tryptophan, a  sleep-promoting amino acid. Top picks for sleep are apples with peanut butter, cheese and crackers or cereal and milk.
  • Magnesium is another mineral that aids with sleep – get some from nuts, seeds, bananas, beans, whole grains and avocado.

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Burning Off High Calorie Foods: Summer Picnics

by in Fitness, May 26, 2012
strawberry shortcake
Before you reach for a second helping of strawberry shortcake, consider that you'd have to play tennis for 45 minutes to work it off.

Gearing up for grilling season? Don’t let too many high-cal favorites keep you from staying trim this summer. Here’s what you should keep in mind at your next picnic.

Crunching the numbers
Everyone burns calories a little differently, the values below are averages based on a 155-pound person.

Mains
1 foot long hot dog = 500 calories = 1 hour of swimming freestyle
1 cheeseburger = 400 calories = 75 minutes of kayaking
5-ounces BBQ ribs = 465 calories = 2 hours 15 minutes of body surfing

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Low-Mercury Fish

by in Healthy Recipes, May 24, 2012
tilapia
Tilapia is a low-mercury, low-cost fish with a very mild flavor.

Recommendations for eating seafood can be confusing. Fish can be a low-calorie and heart-healthy choice and the omega-3 rich fish have additional health-protecting benefits. On the other hand, some seafood contains mercury, which can be harmful in large amounts. There are plenty of seafood options with little or no mercury. Here are some fabulous options.

Tilapia
Tilapia is mild, tender and super budget-friendly. According the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch, American farm-raised tilapia is the most sustainable choice.

Recipes:
Baked Tilapia
Broiled Tilapia With Horseradish and Herb-Spiked Mayo

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8 Foods You Should Not Refrigerate

by in Healthy Tips, May 22, 2012

tomato

Summer is prime time for produce. While you may know how to cook and eat these seasonal goodies, are you storing them correctly? Here are 8 farmers’ markets finds that should stay out of the fridge.

Tomatoes
The chill of the icebox makes tomatoes dull and mealy. Store on the counter (under-ripe ones can go on the windowsill). If they begin to get too ripe, it’s time to make tomato jam or roasted tomato sauce.

Melon
Keep whole melons like watermelon, cantaloupe and honeydew on the counter for best flavor. USDA research found that storage at room temp may even help keep the antioxidants better intact. Once cut, store in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 days.

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Product Review: Sedona Food Dehydrator

by in Product Reviews, May 19, 2012

food dehydratorThere are tactics for food preservation beyond canning and pickling. With garden season approaching, I was excited to try out this nifty appliance.

My Take
At first I was surprised when a very large, heavy box appeared on my doorstep, but I was immediately impressed by the looks of this machine. Measuring about 14 inches high and 17 inches wide, it has digital timer and temperature gauges and easy-to-read controls. It also comes equipped with various well-made (BPA free) trays to accommodate any type of food. My favorite was an ingenious flat tray for making crackers and fruit leather.

The concept is fairly simple: The machine circulates warm air throughout the chamber to evaporate the liquid out of foods. The drying process concentrates the flavor, changes the texture and of course helps increase shelf life. The best part is, there’s none of the preservatives or sweeteners that you might find in commercial varieties of dehydrated food.

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Heart-Rate Monitors 101

by in Fitness, May 15, 2012
heart rate monitors
Do you use a heart-rate monitor?

Looking for a way to make the most of your workouts? Try a heart-rate monitor on for size.

What is a Heart-Rate Monitor?
As advertised, these gadgets measure your heart rate (a.k.a take your pulse) by sensing and displaying how many times your heart beats each minute. While heart rates will vary from person to person, a healthy adult typically averages anywhere from 60 to 100 beats per minute while at rest. As physical activity increases, so will the beats.

While there are some decent mobile apps out there for pedometers, it’s a very different scene for heart-rate monitors – apps just won’t cut it (at least not yet).

The most common heart-rate monitor styles are worn on the wrist, but some come with chest straps for continuous monitoring of heart activity. Chest strap models are slightly more cumbersome but are also more accurate (and more expensive).  For the wrist-only models, you usually have to stop activity to get an accurate reading. There’s also a huge variety of options – units range in price from $30.00 to more than $500.00! I’m a big fan of anything made by Timex and Polar has a nice variety of budget-friendly models.

Extra features you may find include timers, GPS devices, footware accessories that measure distance traveled and the ability to store data and download it to your computer to track progress.

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Food Safety at the Farmers’ Market

by in Food Safety, May 13, 2012

apples

Farmers’ markets are the prime destination for fresh and local food, but they’re not immune to germs and bacteria. Farmers work hard to comply with state and federal food safety standards but patrons also have to keep their eyes peeled (and their produce washed). Use our tips to help avoid food safety pitfalls.

Produce
Whether it’s organically grown or not, produce needs to be washed well. It’s a good thing that farmers’ market produce isn’t waxed like much of what you’ll find in the grocery store, but these local goodies are often covered with dirt. Rinse delicate items like berries, herbs and lettuces well just before use; rinsing them before storing them can cause them to get moldy or mushy. Sturdy produce like carrots, apples and potatoes can handle a good scrub. Thick-skinned foods like melons should be washed before you slice into them.

Some vendors turn their produce into drinks like apple cider. Look for pasteurized beverages, especially if you’re pregnant, elderly or serving them to young children.

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