All Posts By Dana Angelo White

How to Deal with Post-Workout Hunger

by in Fitness, August 12, 2012

exercise
Does an exercise session leave you famished or does the thought of food post workout make you ill? There’s a right and wrong way to eat after exercise; find out the balance to get the most out of your fitness routine.

Feel the Burn
Some people question whether or not it’s worth it to exercise since burning lots of calories can make you hungrier. It IS worth it and there are tricks you can adopt to beat this vicious cycle. Choosing the right foods after a workout can make a huge difference.

Research says hunger pangs may hit women harder than men; hormones are to thank for that. For this reason gals need to pay extra attention to how they eat before and after exercise.

On the flip side, other studies have found that exercise lowers levels of a hunger-spiking hormone called ghrelin. The only caveat here is that the exercise needs to be intense, not a leisurely a stroll on the treadmill.

Frequency of exercise also plays an important role. Hitting the gym (or however you like to sweat) regularly trains your body to burn calories more efficiently and of course lowers your risk of an onslaught of ailments including diabetes and heart disease. The bottom line is exercise: is good; here’s how to fuel it properly.

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31 Days of Tomatoes

by in Uncategorized, August 9, 2012

tomatoes
The steamy days of August make for outrageously sweet and juicy tomatoes. We’ve got an idea for every day this month, but whatever you do, don’t refrigerate them!

1.    Start by getting all the fun facts. Read In Season: Tomatoes.

2.    Hit your local farmers’ market for lesser-known varieties like Black Krim, White Cherry and Sweet Tangerine.

3.    The season can start early if tomatoes are grown in a green house.

4.    Roast tomatoes with potatoes.

5.    Make sweet, sour and spicy jam.

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Food Fight: Greek vs. Regular Yogurt

by in Uncategorized, August 7, 2012

yogurt
Deciding whether a food is healthy or not can be really difficult, especially when food companies market their products in such clever ways. It’s even harder to decide between foods with healthy components, or similar-sounding foods. For this food fight we’ll explore regular and Greek-style yogurt — which one is the better choice?

Greek
Greek-style yogurt contains less water than regular varieties. This creates yogurt with tangier flavor and thicker consistency; this also affects the nutrition facts. One cup of non-fat plain Greek yogurt has 80 calories and 13 grams of protein (comparison to regular yogurt is below). The calcium and vitamin D content of all yogurts will vary from brand to brand (and whether you choose, non-fat, low-fat or whole milk) so check labels.

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Market Watch: Sun Jewel Melon

by in Farmers' Market Finds, August 5, 2012

melon
After my weekly CSA delivery, I was prepared to write all about a gorgeous looking spaghetti squash that was in my share. But when I open the “squash,” I discovered that it wasn’t a squash at all, but a melon!

I put in a call in to my farmer (yes, proud to say I have her on speed dial); I wanted her to enlighten me – what was this bright yellow melon called? She introduced me to the Sun Jewel. This Asian variety (also called a Korean Yellow Melon) has pale yellow flesh that tastes similar to honeydew, but with more of a cucumber-pear flavor.

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Cucumbers, 5 Ways

by in Uncategorized, August 3, 2012

cucumbers
This time of year farmers’ markets and backyard gardens are overflowing with cucumbers. There are so many ways to eat these crunchy and refreshing veggies — here are 5 favorites.

Tangy Pickles
Whether you prefer sweet, sour, hot or mild – you can adjust the flavors any way you like when you make your own.
Recipe: Homemade Pickles

Creamy Sauces
Cucumbers give texture and unmistakable freshness to this classic Greek sauce.
Recipe: Tzatziki

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6 Condiments with Healthy Benefits

by in Healthy Tips, August 2, 2012

mustard
It’s never a bad idea to hold the mayo if you’re trying to cut calories (and cholesterol) but some condiments can actually improve your health. Now, we aren’t suggesting you start downing gallons of these accoutrements, but you might want to make an effort to gravitate towards these six.

Mustard
Used in ancient times to treat ailments of the kidneys, lungs and digestive system, mustard seed (the main ingredient in mustard) is health food to the max. You can find all kinds of mustard at your local market, but it’s actually well worth it to make your own. Sure, you can use it as a sandwich spread but it’s also a great addition to salad dressings, dipping sauces, marinades for pork and poultry and in this recipe for roasted fish.

Ketchup
Cooked tomato products such as tomato sauce and ketchup contain more of the heart protecting antioxidant lycopene. Not a fan of store-bought ketchup? Make your own.

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Product Review: Nike FuelBand

by in Fitness, Product Reviews, July 31, 2012

fuel band
Tracking physical activity can help keep you motivated, but most calorie-counting knickknacks are famously inaccurate. Can Nike’s newest gadget get it right? I couldn’t wait to test out the FuelBand.

My Take
A gadget fans dream — and you don’t have to be a computer wizard to figure it out. The FuelBand allows you to track your activity (excercise and dozens of everyday actions), calories and progress. After a simple online set up to link the FuelBand with your computer and iPhone, you’re on your way.

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7 Foods With the Most Omega-3s

by in Healthy Recipes, July 26, 2012

walnuts Most folks are hip to the fact that they need more omega-3 fats in their diet, but that doesn’t mean they’re actually eating enough. Here’s a refresher on why omega-3s do the body good and some delish recipes to boost your intake.

Health Benefits
There are 3 main types of omega-3 fats that are typically referred to by their abbreviated names DHA, EPA and ALA. The DHA and EPA types are plentiful in fish and help fight inflammation. They also contribute to heart health, brain function and immunity. If that’s not enough, they also help with healthy joints, skin, eyes and skin. The ALA type of omega-3 is found mostly in plant-based foods. Once eaten, the body converts ALA to a small amount of DHA and EPA. ALA-rich foods are good for you for a variety of reasons but to really reap the benefits of omega-3, you want to make sure to get most of them from EPA and DHA.

Foods
Experts recommend getting about 1,000 milligrams of omega-3s per day, mostly from DHA and EPA.

Salmon
Salmon is one of the best fish choices for healthy fats. A 4-ounce (raw) portion will serve up more than 1600 milligrams of DHA and EPA.

Recipe: Blackened Salmon With Mango Salsa

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EWG Update: The Dirty Dozen and Clean Fifteen

by in Food News, Food Safety, July 22, 2012

dirty dozen
The Environmental Working Group constantly scrutinizes the amounts of pesticide residues found on popular produce. We want to keep you updated on which fruits and veggies you should buy organic – here’s a review of the 2012 Shopper’s Guide to Pesticide Residues.

The Dirty Dozen PLUS
The top 12 most contaminated had remained relatively consistent other than a few items shifting positions. But in 2012 a “PLUS” category was added to the original dozen. Conventionally-grown green beans, kale and collard greens have been given special consideration because of an especially dangerous toxin they are treated with. Organophosphate insecticides are toxic to the neurological system and are found in even higher amounts on bell peppers and nectarines (numbers 3 and 6 on the Dirty Dozen list).

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Burning Off High-Calorie Foods: Fair Foods

by in Dining Out, Fitness, July 20, 2012

fair food
Is your family hitting the local fair circuit this summer? Carnival concessions are famously fattening. We’re not saying to boycott fair foods all together but since these treats don’t come with a food label, we’ll fill you in on just how many calories you’re gobbling down, and what it would take to burn them off. As always, moderation is key!

Crunching the Numbers
Everyone burns calories a little differently, the values below are averages based on a 155-pound person.

1 Corn Dog  = 375 calories = 1 hour, 30 minutes walking the boardwalk

Funnel Cake = 760 calories = 1 hour, 20 minutes of singles tennis

Fried Twinkie = 420 calories = 1 hour water skiing

Cotton Candy =175 calories = 30 minutes whitewater kayaking

Candy Apple = 375 calories = 40 minutes running (8 mph)

Chili Fries = 700 calories = 3.5 hours playing frisbee

Nachos With Cheese Sauce = 850 calories = 1 hour, 15 minutes of vigorous swimming

Turkey leg = 1140 calories = 1 hour of beach volleyball

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