All Posts By Dana Angelo White

Ask a Dietitian: Does It Matter How Much You Chew Your Food?

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, July 28, 2014

almonds
Many of us are guilty, at least on occasion, of scarfing down food and swallowing large mouthfuls. Beyond that, who hasn’t heard some variation of the chew-your-food-X-number-of-times counsel? Such advice may sound like dietary superstition, but how well a person chomps actually matters. Chewing rate can have a significant impact on digestion of nutrients and may also affect hunger levels.

The Tooth of the Matter
In recent years, several studies have determined that chewing food thoroughly makes more nutrients available for absorption. Extra chewing allows compound within the food an additional opportunity to combine before they make it further down the digestive tract, which may have a positive influence on health. According to some studies, taking more time to chew also promotes a slower rate of eating, which can help with better appetite control and (in the long run) improved weight management.

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Make Your Own Banana-Chocolate Protein Bar

by in Healthy Recipes, July 25, 2014

protein bars
One sure way to avoid the highly processed add-ins found in many protein bars is to turn out a batch using your own ingredients and a boost of protein powder. A word on that front: You’ll want a protein powder low in added and artificial sweeteners. Whey, which is dairy-based, is one good option, but there are multiple types of powders on the market (some decent, some less than — so it’s wise to take a close look at ingredients).

Banana Chocolate-Chip Protein Bars
Makes 12 bars

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Market Watch: Green Tiger Zucchini

by in Farmers' Market Finds, July 18, 2014

zucchini
If zucchini is a seasonal staple in your kitchen, be on the lookout at farmers markets for tiger zucchini, a less common variety. Named for its pale green stripes, tiger zucchini is a European hybrid that is best when harvested young (on the smaller side). The flavor is sweet and nutty with a tender crunch.

One medium specimen of the summer squash has only 30 calories and 2 grams of each fiber and protein. And it’s not so shabby in the vitamin and mineral department: Each tiger zucchini contains 56 percent of the daily recommendation for vitamin C, 4 percent iron and 15 to 20 percent of B vitamins folate, B6 and riboflavin.

Thanks to their good flavor, tiger zucchini can be used in any recipe that calls for conventional zucchini, including these:

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Food Fight!: Caffeinated Drinks

by in Food Fight, July 16, 2014

caffeinated drinks
Looking for that morning or afternoon buzz? Caffeinated creations — including coffee, tea, soda and energy drinks — vary not only in their pick-me-up powers but also in their nutritional benefits. Find out which ones offer the most (and least) perks.

Coffee
Caffeine content: A typical cup of coffee (8 fluid ounces) contains 80 to 100 milligrams.
Perks and minuses: While black coffee contains an almost nonexistent amount of calories (about 5 per cup), too much cream and sugar will quickly change that. On the plus side, coffee is rich in flavonoids and other antioxidants that may benefit brain and heart health.

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Three Cheers For the Healthiest Berry Desserts

by in In Season, July 5, 2014

raspberry sherbet

Independence Day may be over, but the summer berry season is just hitting its stride. If your kitchen is bursting with all kinds of juicy gems, here’s a collection of red and blue berry desserts fit for any summer celebration.

Raspberries
Super-high in fiber (one cup provides more than 30 percent of the daily recommended value), these delicate berries can be found in various shades — including red white, black and purple — at farmers markets. Make homemade sherbet better than anything out of the freezer aisle or layer raspberries with other summer fruits in a cool and colorful terrine.

Raspberry-Buttermilk Sherbet (above, from Food Network Magazine)

Raspberry-Watermelon Terrine with Blueberry Sauce
summer fruit terrine

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Summer Sips: Which Are the Healthiest of the Bunch?

by in Grocery Shopping, July 2, 2014

summer drinks
Looking for something refreshingly fun to beat the heat this summer? Check out these sensible sippers. Read more

Taste Test: Which Hot Dogs Are the Top Dogs?

by in Taste Test, June 30, 2014

hot dogs
With the season of backyard food fests in full swing, Healthy Eats vetted the most popular hot dog brands around to see which ones deserve a coveted spot on the grill grates. Find out which frank emerged as top dog.

The Criteria
We rated beef wieners on a 5-point scale (5 being highest), judging the dogs on taste, ingredient quality and nutrition and paying special attention to calories, fat and sodium. We stuck with regular franks instead of the reduced-fat versions, as many of those use a considerable amount of fillers made from potato starch to displace some of the meat (no thank you). We were also on the lookout for the presence of preservatives such as sodium nitrite. Hot dogs ranged in size from 42 to 57 grams (1.5 to 2 ounces) per piece.  Read more

The Smartest Ways to Buy and Store Summer Produce

by in In Season, June 26, 2014

apricots
How you pick and store summer fruits can mean the difference between mealy disappointment and juicy perfection.

Berries
Buying: Turn to these antioxidant-packed fruits for a burst of sweet-tart flavor and vitamin C. When shopping for strawberries, raspberries, blueberries and blackberries, look for plump and well-shaped pieces that are brightly colored and firm.

Storing: Berries can be stored at room temperature for about 1 to 2 days. After that, get more mileage by keeping them in the fridge. Wash just before using and dry gently with a paper towel. Want to freeze berries? Use these tips.

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Embracing a New Old-Fashioned Take on Healthy Eating

by in Cookbooks, June 25, 2014

nourished kitchen cover
Sustainable. Gorgeous. Rich in nutrients. These are three ways The Nourished Kitchen captures the fresh and simple elegance of food. In her new cookbook, blogger and real-food proponent Jennifer McGruther — who favors the likes of bone-enriched broths and fermented goods — entices readers to once again get their hands dirty in the kitchen.

What are you growing in your garden this year?
This time of the year, we’re just starting our garden, as mountain living means that snow can linger into June and arrive again in September.  This year, my family is planning to plant lettuce, hearty greens, radishes, carrots and a wide variety of mints. Chocolate mint and mountain mint are always favorites.

Do you have a favorite seasonal food or dish, something you look forward to every cooking year?
Every season brings something I cherish, some recipe my family looks forward to all year. In summer, it’s true sour pickles, seasoned with dill, garlic and spice. Pickling cucumbers enjoy such a short season. I buy them by the case, pack them into stoneware crocks and ferment them with a spiced brine until they come out sharp, salty and sour. Fall brings quince, and I like to pair it with apples and pears in a simple sauce, or to poach the quince and drop them into flaky pie crusts. In winter, I lean on savory winter squash pies and stews of root vegetables, grass-fed beef and broth. In springtime, it’s lovage soup — all clean and bright in flavor, but still warm enough to take the edge off the cold evenings of spring.

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Taste Test: Kale Chips

by in Taste Test, May 25, 2014

kale chips
Crunchy versions of this leafy green vegetable are taking the chip aisle by storm. There’s no doubt kale is delicious and nutritious — but do its dried spin-offs live up to the hype?

The Criteria
We rated these leafy snacks on a 5-point scale (5 being highest) and judged them on taste, texture, price and nutrition, with special attention paid to stats such as calories and sodium. All of the brands were vegan and gluten-free, but none contained only kale. Most featured various spices and nuts, so it’s worth reading labels carefully, particularly for anyone who has food allergies.

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