All Posts By Dana Angelo White

Food Fight: French Fries vs. Sweet Potato Fries

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, September 5, 2016

French fries aren’t generally considered health food, but there are many options to consider. Are you baking them, frying them or getting them at the drive-thru? Is it a healthier move to order the sweet spuds when they appear on the menu? Here are the real differences between traditional french fries and those made from sweet potatoes.

French Fries
Potatoes have a bad reputation, but they’re actually filled with good-for-you nutrients, including fiber and potassium. The calorie count is also relatively low, coming in at about 170 calories for a whole potato. Armed with this knowledge, you can easily see how a sliced and roasted spud with a drizzle of olive oil can be a healthy side dish.

If you hit up the freezer section for a bag of fries, every 3-ounce portion (about 12 pieces) contains 120 calories, 5 grams of fat and 300 milligrams of sodium — but who eats only 12? Fast-food fries can get you into even more trouble, with a medium-sized order averaging 400 calories and 17 grams of fat. Sodium levels can range from 300 to more than 1,200 milligrams, depending on how those fries are seasoned. Read more

Creative No-Cook Recipes

by in Healthy Recipes, August 22, 2016

Beat the heat and spend less time in the kitchen with these healthy and inspired no-cook dishes.

Layered Squash
Try this out-of-the-box summer squash recipe to wow guests, or enjoy it as a simple weeknight dinner.
Recipe to Try: Summer Squash Carpaccio (pictured above) Read more

How to Use All That End-of-Summer Produce

by in Healthy Recipes, August 21, 2016

At this point in the season you might feel like you’re drowning in fruits and veggies. Don’t let all that summer produce go to waste. Here are some delicious and healthy ways to hold on to the goodness a bit longer.

Baked Goods
Bake an abundance of produce into muffins, cakes, pies cobblers, crisps and even cookies. User-friendly options include seasonal berries, chopped stone fruit and shredded summer squash and carrots. Herbs, onions, spinach kale and other savory items can be incorporated into breads, biscuits and pizza crusts as well.
Recipe to Try: Blueberry Whole-Wheat Muffins

Salads and Slaws
Get some extra mileage out of cabbage, kale, beet greens, kohlrabi and broccoli (stems and all). Shred or spiralize them, then give them a quick toss in a flavorful dressing. You can pack a whole bunch of nutrition into a side salad like this.
Recipe to Try: Cabbage-Kohlrabi Slaw

Read more

5 Strategies for Back-to-School Prep

by in Healthy Tips, August 20, 2016

Parents, you’ve made it through summer, and back-to-school season is upon us. Whether you’re shedding a tear or jumping for joy, it’s time to get organized for the unavoidable craziness of packing lunches and busy weeknight dinners. Here are five sanity-saving tips to kick off back-to-school on the right foot.

Make a Game Plan
Take a few minutes each week to chart out lunches and dinners. Let the kids take part in the brainstorming, to make it a family affair. Taking the guesswork out of each day will help the week run more smoothly.

Gear Up
Dig out those lunchboxes, bento containers and ice packs. If they’re scrappy and beat-up, consider investing in new ones — lunch vessels should be clean and functional. Bentology and EasyLunchBoxes have many fun and convenient options.

Batch Ahead
Set aside some time to make a few family-friendly meals for the freezer. Falling back on home-cooked dishes like lasagna and chili when pressed for time can turn a hectic weeknight into prime family time. And don’t forget about breakfast! Batches of muffins, granola bars and egg cups are terrific make-ahead recipes. Read more

Market Watch: Tomatillos

by in Farmers' Market Finds, In Season, August 14, 2016

One of the best things about going to the farmers market is you never know what you might find. I ran to my local market in the hopes of picking up some tomatoes, but instead I simply couldn’t resist these neon-green tomatillos. If you’re intimidated by this member of the nightshade family, don’t be; they are easy to cook with, and there are many ways to enjoy them.

Tomatillo Facts
Also known as a “jamberry,” the tomatillo is related to the gooseberry. Tucked behind a papery husk is a bright green fruit that resembles a petite tomato. Tomatillos are firm, shiny and slightly sticky to the touch. Remove the husk and wash before enjoying them cooked or raw. There’s plenty of nutrition packed into these beauties: One cup contains 42 calories, 1 gram of unsaturated fat and 2 grams of both protein and fiber. There’s also potassium, niacin, iron and more than 25 percent of the recommended daily amount of vitamin C.

What to Do with Tomatillos
Choose tomatillos with intact husks and firm skin. They will keep at room temperature for a day or so and should then be stored in a paper bag in the refrigerator drawer for up to one month. Use them to create salsa (aka salsa verde) and guacamole. Blend them with chiles, cucumber, fresh herbs and vodka for a marvelous spin on a classic brunch cocktail. Read more

Can’t Make It to Rio? This Lightened-Up Feijoada Is the Next-Best Thing

by in Healthy Recipes, August 9, 2016

OK, so you’re watching the Summer Olympics from your couch instead of live in Rio de Janeiro. Time to make a batch of feijoada — the Brazilian black-bean stew that’s considered the country’s national dish — invite some friends over and throw a summer games viewing party. Feijoada (“fay-jwah-duh”) is a comfort-food staple in Brazil that’s traditionally made with beans and lots of fatty meats. Our version cuts way back on the fat and calories, highlights the healthiest attributes of the dish (fiber- and protein-filled legumes and aromatic vegetables and herbs) and has just enough meat to lend the dish its signature smoky flavor. Read more

Eat Like an Olympian: Marlen Esparza

by in Fitness, Healthy Tips, August 6, 2016

Ever wonder what it must be like to walk in the shoes of a professional athlete? We chatted with 2012 Olympic bronze medalist Marlen Esparza about boxing and what it takes to eat like a champion.

Is nutrition an important part of your training?
Nutrition is an extremely important part of any athlete’s training. What you eat fuels your body for your sport, and if you want to be the very best and at the top of your game, you have to fuel your body in the healthiest way possible.

What are some of your favorite pre- and post-workout snacks?
Before workouts, my “go-to” is a smoothie with Nutty for ‘Nana yogurt from Chobani [Esparza’s sponsor], plus sliced bananas, organic honey, powdered peanut butter, chia seeds, almond milk and steel-cut oats all blended together.

One of my favorite post-workout snacks to cut down on cravings would be black cherry Greek yogurt topped with fresh raspberries, coconut flakes, dark chocolate chips (not too many) and sliced almonds. Read more

Tips for Exercising in the Heat

by in Fitness, July 30, 2016

Don’t let the summertime heat and humidity ruin your exercise enthusiasm. Following these simple rules to help make outdoor workouts a success.

The Risks

Feeling the burn in hot conditions can increase your risk for injury, dehydration and heat illness. Issues can range from minor fatigue and muscle cramping to a more serious case of heat exhaustion. The worst-case scenario is a condition referred to as heat stroke, where the body loses the ability to cool itself. (This is a medical emergency and requires immediate medical attention.) The good news is you can protect yourself by following these five rules.

Rule #1: Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate.

Around-the-clock hydration is imperative for folks who exercise multiple days a week. Water is ideal for moderate activity, but consider choosing a sports drink with calories and electrolytes for more vigorous activities lasting longer than 60 minutes. The American Academy of Sports Medicine recommends 8 to 12 fluid ounces of water 10 to 15 minutes before exercise and 3 to 8 fluid ounces every 15 to 20 minutes for workouts less than 60 minutes. For guidelines on longer-duration workouts, visit the American College of Sports Medicine website or download the Selecting and Effectively Using Hydration for Fitness brochure. Read more

Market Watch: Basil

by in Farmers' Market Finds, In Season, July 27, 2016

Fresh herbs are flourishing at the local markets. Head out and grab some basil to make these exciting and unexpected recipes.

Basil Facts
Basil is rich in nutrients like vitamins A and C, plus it contains phytochemicals — good-for-you plant-based compounds. Since you probably don’t eat cups of herbs at a time, using small amounts daily in a wide range of recipes allows for the nutrients to stack up.

Basil options are more diverse than you might think. Look for beautiful bouquets of common varieties like “sweet” or “Christmas” for tomato sauce and salads. Try cinnamon basil on fruit salad or spicy Thai basil with noodle and rice dishes. The deep-purple leaves of opal basil make a showstopping pesto or pizza topper.

What to Do with Basil
Basil can be stored like flowers in a small glass of water on the counter for a couple of days. You can also store leaves loosely wrapped in a plastic bag with some paper towels in the veggie drawer of the fridge.

Stack those aromatic leaves on sandwiches, toss them into salad greens, or mash them into hummus, pesto and guacamole. Basil can also be used for dessert, incorporated into frozen treats like sorbet and ice pops. Read more

Hydrating Foods

by in Uncategorized, July 18, 2016

Most people could do a better job of staying hydrated. Counting glasses of H2O is important, but so are the foods you eat. Here’s the lowdown on some in-season foods to perk up your hydration.

Assess Your Hydration
The best way to tell if you’re getting enough fluids is to pay attention to your body. Urination should be frequent and light yellow to clear in color. The more fluid you lose in sweat, the more you should replace. Aim to take in half your body weight in fluid ounces as a baseline – that’s 75 fluid ounces for a 150-pound person. If you exercise, drink more — especially when working out in the heat and humidity.

Fluid-Boosting Foods
In addition to drinking plenty of water, reach for these seasonal foods to help stay hydrated this summer.

Lettuce
Iceberg is low in calories and has one of the highest water contents of any food. Other leafy varieties like romaine and green leaf are also good options.

Get more from: salads and lettuce cups

Watermelon
You can feel the hydration pouring from this melon; it also contains plenty of the antioxidant lycopene. Read more