All Posts By Dana Angelo White

Make Your Own Party Mix

by in Healthy Recipes, September 7, 2012

party mix
Party mix used to be something you made at home (often using a recipe on the side of the Chex box), but nowadays you can find packages of crunchy cereal mixes at any gas station. We’re going old school and making our own, but with a healthier spin.

Nutrition Facts
Along with convenience comes preservatives — packaged sweet cereal mixes have multiple sources of added sugars, not to mention a lengthy list of artificial flavors and preservatives and even some trans fats. Most varieties will run about 130 to 150 calories and 4 to 5 grams of fat per serving (servings range from 1/3 to ½ cup depending on the flavor).

Making your own with nuts and other real food ingredients may not slash calories and fat but you’ll still be better off — you’ll know exactly what you’re munching.

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Making Freezer Jam

by in Healthy Recipes, September 6, 2012

freezer jam
I try to hold on to the flavors of summer every way possible. Refrigerator jams are a fabulous way to get a few more weeks of out fresh fruit but wouldn’t it be nice to savor it even longer?  If you haven’t yet mastered the art of canning, there’s still hope for enjoying homemade jam well into the winter months.

Freezer Jam Basics
Storing food in the low temperature of the freezer allows for long-term storage. This method also requires little or no cooking, which means the fresh flavors of summer are bursting in every bite.

The key to making successful freezer jam is the type and amount of pectin and sugar. Be sure to check the measurement instructions on your favorite brand, they may differ than what’s in the recipes below.

Store jam in freezer-safe plastic containers, plastic bags or glass jars. It will keep for up to one year in the freezer and 3 weeks in the fridge. It’s best to use jars with wide mouths and straight neck. When filling, make sure to leave ½-inch of room at the top for expansion upon freezing.

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Nutrition News: Is Eating Egg Yolks as Bad as Smoking?

by in Food News, September 5, 2012

egg yolk
By now you’ve probably heard about the study claiming eating egg yolks is as bad for your heart as smoking. We just had to weigh in on this!

We Heart Eggs
We’ve already discussed the benefits of eggs. Eating them (yolks and all) offers protein, heart healthy omega-3 fats, plus cell-protecting antioxidants like lutein. Read up on these previous posts:

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Portable Desserts

by in Cookies & Other Desserts, August 31, 2012

cheesecake brownies
Are desserts your job for the potluck picnic? You’re in luck! We’ve got treats for every kind of sweet tooth.

Cookies
Perfectly portioned and finger-licking good. Bring some fresh fruit along too – we suggest watermelon slices or a bushel of juicy peaches.

Almond Blueberry Cookies
Triple Chocolate Cookies

Brownies
Scratch the chocolate itch with these decadent delights. Bake a bunch and freeze for up to 6 months.

Made-Over Deep Dish Brownies
Food Network Kitchens’ Cheesecake Brownies (pictured above)

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Ribs, Lightened Up

by in Meal Makeovers, August 31, 2012

ribs
This backyard classic can be tricky to make, messy to eat and tough on the waistline. We can’t do much about the mess, but can help out with everything else. Grab your napkins!

Nutrition Facts
Order up a platter of baby backs at a restaurant and you’ll be downing over 1,000 calories and a staggering 70-plus grams of fat. Portion control must be emphasized no matter what and making your own is your best bet.

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10 Fresh Brown-Bag Lunches for Kids

by in Back to School, August 27, 2012

pasta salad
Don’t let packing back-to-school lunches stress you out; we’ve got 10 fun and fresh ideas the kiddies will gobble up.

Safety First
Start by ensuring your little ones’ lunches are safe from food germs. Here are our food safety tips for packing kids’ lunches.

1.) Yogurt Parfait
Pack up yogurt, with small containers of fresh fruit and granola for crunch, and let kids layer them at lunchtime. Or try making the parfait ahead of time in a screw-top jar for a fun and healthy on-the-go lunch.

Regular or Greek? Find out which yogurt wins our Food Fight

2.) Quesadillas
Give grilled cheese a makeover! Combine whole-grain tortillas, veggies and cheese. Melt in the microwave, slice, and voila – excellent finger food hot or cold.

Get more quesadilla recipe ideas

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Chocolate Raspberry Trifle

by in Healthy Recipes, August 26, 2012

chocolate raspberry trifle

This Berry Trifle with Amaretto is a crowd-pleaser at potluck picnics. Now here’s a little something for the chocolate lovers.

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The Healthiest Options at Frozen Yogurt Chains

by in Dining Out, August 25, 2012

frozen yogurt
It seems like fro-yo joints are popping up on every corner – there are 3 in my neighborhood! While cold and creamy soft-serve yogurt is a delicious concoction, it’s not automatically health food. Wherever you happen to order up frozen yogurt, keep the portions modest (order the smallest size) and the toppings minimal. We scanned popular menus for the healthiest offerings. Here are our top picks for sensible, yet tasty treats.

TCBY
Choose protein-packed Greek Honey Vanilla or 90-calorie Classic Tart topped with bananas, cherries or chocolate sprinkles.

Pinkberry
Fun and lower calorie options include Green Tea, Coconut or Watermelon. Top a small portion off with toasted almonds, dark chocolate crisps or kiwi.

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Eggplant 5 Ways

by in Uncategorized, August 17, 2012

eggplant
We all love good old eggplant parm, but this nightshade veggie is much more versatile. Here are five sensational summer recipes.

Grilled and Glazed
The char of the grill brings out the smoky sweetness of this veggie – perfect with savory and tangy hoisin sauce.

Recipe: Food Network Magazine’s Hoisin Eggplant (pictured above)

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Decaf Coffee: Is It Healthy?

by in Is It Healthy?, August 16, 2012

coffee
If caffeine gives you the jitters you may opt for coffee that’s “de-buzzed.” But is this a healthy choice?

Yes?
While caffeine does have some health benefits, too much can be harmful, especially if you have a heart condition. For this reason, many folks opt for the decaf version of their morning (or evening) Joe. Decaf can also come in handy if you’re trying to break the caffeine habit. Pregnant women sometimes switch to decaf to keep their morning ritual somewhat intact.

Coffee is also famous for it’s antioxidant content. Some of the specific antioxidants vary depending on the type of coffee bean, but both decaf and regular provide some of these cell protecting nutrients.

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