All Posts By Dana Angelo White

Burning Off High Calorie Foods: Summer Picnics

by in Fitness, May 26, 2012
strawberry shortcake
Before you reach for a second helping of strawberry shortcake, consider that you'd have to play tennis for 45 minutes to work it off.

Gearing up for grilling season? Don’t let too many high-cal favorites keep you from staying trim this summer. Here’s what you should keep in mind at your next picnic.

Crunching the numbers
Everyone burns calories a little differently, the values below are averages based on a 155-pound person.

Mains
1 foot long hot dog = 500 calories = 1 hour of swimming freestyle
1 cheeseburger = 400 calories = 75 minutes of kayaking
5-ounces BBQ ribs = 465 calories = 2 hours 15 minutes of body surfing

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Low-Mercury Fish

by in Healthy Recipes, May 24, 2012
tilapia
Tilapia is a low-mercury, low-cost fish with a very mild flavor.

Recommendations for eating seafood can be confusing. Fish can be a low-calorie and heart-healthy choice and the omega-3 rich fish have additional health-protecting benefits. On the other hand, some seafood contains mercury, which can be harmful in large amounts. There are plenty of seafood options with little or no mercury. Here are some fabulous options.

Tilapia
Tilapia is mild, tender and super budget-friendly. According the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch, American farm-raised tilapia is the most sustainable choice.

Recipes:
Baked Tilapia
Broiled Tilapia With Horseradish and Herb-Spiked Mayo

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8 Foods You Should Not Refrigerate

by in Healthy Tips, May 22, 2012

tomato

Summer is prime time for produce. While you may know how to cook and eat these seasonal goodies, are you storing them correctly? Here are 8 farmers’ markets finds that should stay out of the fridge.

Tomatoes
The chill of the icebox makes tomatoes dull and mealy. Store on the counter (under-ripe ones can go on the windowsill). If they begin to get too ripe, it’s time to make tomato jam or roasted tomato sauce.

Melon
Keep whole melons like watermelon, cantaloupe and honeydew on the counter for best flavor. USDA research found that storage at room temp may even help keep the antioxidants better intact. Once cut, store in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 days.

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Product Review: Sedona Food Dehydrator

by in Product Reviews, May 19, 2012

food dehydratorThere are tactics for food preservation beyond canning and pickling. With garden season approaching, I was excited to try out this nifty appliance.

My Take
At first I was surprised when a very large, heavy box appeared on my doorstep, but I was immediately impressed by the looks of this machine. Measuring about 14 inches high and 17 inches wide, it has digital timer and temperature gauges and easy-to-read controls. It also comes equipped with various well-made (BPA free) trays to accommodate any type of food. My favorite was an ingenious flat tray for making crackers and fruit leather.

The concept is fairly simple: The machine circulates warm air throughout the chamber to evaporate the liquid out of foods. The drying process concentrates the flavor, changes the texture and of course helps increase shelf life. The best part is, there’s none of the preservatives or sweeteners that you might find in commercial varieties of dehydrated food.

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Heart-Rate Monitors 101

by in Fitness, May 15, 2012
heart rate monitors
Do you use a heart-rate monitor?

Looking for a way to make the most of your workouts? Try a heart-rate monitor on for size.

What is a Heart-Rate Monitor?
As advertised, these gadgets measure your heart rate (a.k.a take your pulse) by sensing and displaying how many times your heart beats each minute. While heart rates will vary from person to person, a healthy adult typically averages anywhere from 60 to 100 beats per minute while at rest. As physical activity increases, so will the beats.

While there are some decent mobile apps out there for pedometers, it’s a very different scene for heart-rate monitors – apps just won’t cut it (at least not yet).

The most common heart-rate monitor styles are worn on the wrist, but some come with chest straps for continuous monitoring of heart activity. Chest strap models are slightly more cumbersome but are also more accurate (and more expensive).  For the wrist-only models, you usually have to stop activity to get an accurate reading. There’s also a huge variety of options – units range in price from $30.00 to more than $500.00! I’m a big fan of anything made by Timex and Polar has a nice variety of budget-friendly models.

Extra features you may find include timers, GPS devices, footware accessories that measure distance traveled and the ability to store data and download it to your computer to track progress.

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Food Safety at the Farmers’ Market

by in Food Safety, May 13, 2012

apples

Farmers’ markets are the prime destination for fresh and local food, but they’re not immune to germs and bacteria. Farmers work hard to comply with state and federal food safety standards but patrons also have to keep their eyes peeled (and their produce washed). Use our tips to help avoid food safety pitfalls.

Produce
Whether it’s organically grown or not, produce needs to be washed well. It’s a good thing that farmers’ market produce isn’t waxed like much of what you’ll find in the grocery store, but these local goodies are often covered with dirt. Rinse delicate items like berries, herbs and lettuces well just before use; rinsing them before storing them can cause them to get moldy or mushy. Sturdy produce like carrots, apples and potatoes can handle a good scrub. Thick-skinned foods like melons should be washed before you slice into them.

Some vendors turn their produce into drinks like apple cider. Look for pasteurized beverages, especially if you’re pregnant, elderly or serving them to young children.

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Eggs Benedict, Lightened Up

by in Meal Makeovers, May 9, 2012
eggs benedict
Make breakfast for mom . . . or yourself.

Eggs Benedict is my all time favorite breakfast, but it can be a bit heavy. Here’s a traditional recipe with a few healthy twists.

Nutrition Facts
An order of Eggs Benedict at IHOP has 1020 calories and almost 60 grams of fat – and those aren’t even the most outrageous numbers I’ve seen. Large portions of meat and gobs of buttery sauces are mostly to blame.

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Make Your Own Croissants

by in Healthy Recipes, May 4, 2012
croissant
Fill store-bought puff pastry with fruit, chocolate, cheese or lemon curd.

I’m always looking for something to liven up brunch menus. Try these buttery bite-sized treats at your next get-together.

Nutrition Facts
An average size plain croissant has 310 calories with more than 50% coming from fat. Pile in sugary and high-calorie fillings and it will quickly sabotage your breakfast or brunch. Smart downsizing is the way to have the best of both worlds.

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Cinco de Mayo Drinks and Appetizers

by in Healthy Holidays, May 3, 2012
six-layer dip
Food Network Magazine's Slim Six-Layer Dip

In the US, the 5th of May is a day to celebrate Mexican heritage. Get your Cinco de Mayo fiesta started with these tasty bites and killer cocktails.

Festive Cocktails
Ginger Margaritas
Classic Margaritas, Lightened Up
Sangria
Blueberry-Ginger Mojitos

No-Fail Appetizers
Slim Six-Layer Dip (above)
Chili Cheese Dip
Nectarine Avocado Salsa
Mexican Tortilla Pizza
Mango Salsa Scoops
Margarita Chicken Skewers
Cilantro Scallops

Tell Us: What’s on your Cinco menu?

Tacos, Lightened Up

by in Healthy Recipes, April 30, 2012
pork tacos
Leaner fillings and soft shells make for lighter tacos.

Fried shells, fatty meats and piles of high-cal toppings can make tacos a belly buster. But they don’t have to be; use our tips to give a healthier spin to this Cinco de Mayo favorite.

Nutrition Facts
Whether it’s fast food or home cooking, the calories and fat in tacos can get crazy. Greasy cuts of meat and many of the classic fixings like cheese, sour cream and guacamole are high in fat. Home taco kits also come equipped with sodium-filled taco seasoning packets. A super stuffed taco could easily top 500 calories – and who eats just one?!

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