All Posts By Dana Angelo White

Super Bowl Food Frenzy

by in Healthy Recipes, January 31, 2013

mexican layer dip
Football fan or not, you can appreciate all the fabulous food that comes along with Super Bowl Sunday. We’re taking you on a culinary tour of the teams’ hometowns, plus throwing in some goodies from the host city. We’ve got something for every fan, plus a better-for-you escape from regular football party fare.

New Orleans
Sexy, sassy, spicy is what New Orleans is all about. These Creole-inspired recipes will fire up any party.

Shrimp Creole
Cajun Jambalaya
Cajun Rice Pilaf
Creole BBQ Shrimp
Mini Banana Beignets
10 Ways to Use Cajun Seasoning

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8 Ways to Use Leftovers

by in Healthy Recipes, January 31, 2013

macaroni and cheese
Whether it’s following a holiday celebration or just a regular weeknight, there’s leftover stuff in your fridge you don’t know what to do with. Instead of tossing it out, morph the remnants into new creations instead.

Marinara Sauce
Not enough sauce left for spaghetti and meatballs? Instead, use for homemade pizza, calzones or even soup. Combine chicken broth, diced butternut squash and marinara sauce – cook until squash is tender and puree for an amazingly flavorful lunch or dinner.

Recipe: Tomato-Basil Pizza

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Glycemic Index 101

by in Diets & Weight Loss, January 27, 2013

cereal
You’ve most likely heard of it, but do you really know what it’s all about? Get some education about what the glycemic index is and if you can use it to help make better dietary choices.

What is the Glycemic Index?
The glycemic index (GI) is an old-school tool in the nutrition world. Basically, it’s a scale used to measure how quickly blood sugar goes up after a particular food has been digested. The scale is organized from 0 to 100, with quickly digested foods scoring highest. The GI of a particular food can be affected by numerous factors including how much fiber it contains. Since foods with more fiber take longer to break down, they will have a lower GI.

The GI was established back in the early 1980s. Despite its age, it’s still used very commonly as the foundation for diets and meal planning for weight loss, heart heath and diabetes.

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Volumetrics: Take in Fewer Calories by Eating More

by in Diets & Weight Loss, January 26, 2013

fruit on scale
Back in October 2012, I attended the biggest nutrition conference of the year, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo. One of the most interesting sessions I attended featured Dr. Barbara Rolls and Ellie Krieger. They discussed how you can take in fewer calories by eating MORE food—this concept is known as Volumetrics.

Volumetrics Basics
Penn State professor and researcher Barbara Rolls, PhD, developed the concept after her research concluded that folks don’t like to starve themselves in order to lose weight (I agree). She has conducted extensive research exploring human eating behaviors and presents this plan as a way to lose weight and maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Dr. Rolls suggests enjoying large portions of healthy, satisfying foods to fill up without overdoing the calories. As you might imagine there are lots of fruits and veggies involved. Broth-based soups, nonfat dairy, lean protein and high fiber grains are also on her hit list. Sweets, alcohol and other higher-calorie foods like pizza, they aren’t off limits, but are only to be enjoyed in strict moderation.

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Make Your Own Twinkies

by in Cookies & Other Desserts, January 25, 2013

twinkies
Twinkies had a last hurrah recently when its manufacturer, Hostess, declared bankruptcy. Along with stories of store shelves being emptied, were articles exploring the laundry list of highly processed ingredients including trans fats, processed sweeteners, preservatives and artificial colors. You know what we say to that —- avoid all the junk and make your own!

The Coveted Baking Pan
“Canoe” baking pans have been selling for as much as 100 bucks online. Instead of paying those inflated prices, I hit up a local kitchen supply store. My trusty shopkeeper had quite a few left in stock. If you’re unable to find this type of a pan, the cupcake version of this recipe isn’t quite as nostalgic, but just as tasty.

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Hot Weight Loss Products: Worth the Hype?

by in Food News, January 17, 2013

food on scale
Now that the holiday gluttony is behind us, ‘tis the season for countless weight loss products to come slithering into the spotlight. Lose weight without exercising or changing your diet? Don’t be fooled!

The “Experts” Weigh In?
More now than ever, prominent celebrities (including members of the medical community) are endorsing weight loss supplements – there’s an immediate reason to be skeptical! What’s most important to remember is that these popular figures are usually being compensated in some way to give such products their seal of approval.

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Spice of the Month: Paprika

by in Healthy Recipes, January 11, 2013

paprika
It’s got an amazing flavor and vibrant color – give this spice some love.

Paprika Basics
Paprika is made from grinding the dried pods of sweet red peppers. The various types demonstrate different flavor profiles – some are sweet and mild, others are deeper with more heat. The majority of these spices originate from Spain and Hungary, but paprika is also produced domestically in California.

Nutrition Info
One teaspoon of paprika contains 6 calories and a pretty staggering dose of vitamin A – 21-perecent of the daily recommendation! You’ll also find small amounts of minerals like iron, copper and zinc.

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Bootcamp 101

by in Fitness, January 6, 2013

bootcamp workout
Looking for new form of exercise? Maybe you’re already a fan of this intense workout regimen. Learn more about this exhilarating fitness craze.

Defining Bootcamp
Inspired by military training, bootcamp workouts combine cardio and weight training. Classes may include the use of free weights, bands, balls and plyometric-type exercises – all designed to build lean muscle. Sessions also include lots of interval training where intensity is ramped up for short bursts to maximize calorie burn.

Class attendees will often find themselves switching between running, doing pull-ups, playing tug of war and jumping through a course of oversized tires all in one session. Bootcamp workouts are designed to push participants to work together in groups, while weaving some healthy competition in to the mix. If you’re a competitive person or former athlete, bootcamp is for you. Some programs are designed to be a little less intense and can be offered for specific groups like women only – there’s lots of variety so find the best fit for you.

Classes are typically an hour in length. Some gyms and fitness outlets offer outdoor sessions at local parks. Many also offer package deals where participants can sign up for a month of hour-long sessions that take place 5 days a week.

Like any exercise regimen, check with your doctor before getting started. Those with existing orthopedic issues may need to modify their activity for some of the more high-impact activities.

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5 Ingredients: Green Tea Smoothie

by in 5-Ingredient Recipes, January 5, 2013

green tea smoothie
To celebrate National Hot Tea Month we thought we’d highlight some of the more unique things you can do with brewed tea.  Steep a pot of green tea and save the leftovers for this amazing smoothie. Perfect for breakfast or post-workout, tea perks up this refreshing smoothie, adding flavor and antioxidants for virtually no additional calories.

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Healthy Debate: Should You Choose Organic?

by in Food News, January 3, 2013

organic produce
This topic just won’t seem to go away. Is it worth the extra cost to buy organic or does healthy conventionally grown food trump pesticide-free? It’s really not a black and white issue. To get to the bottom of things, you have to look closely at different types of food.

Defining Organic
An organic food is grown without the use of any chemicals, herbicides and pesticides. Such toxins are potentially detrimental to the nervous system and may also play a role in the development of cancer, hormone dysfunction and damage to tissues like the skin, lungs and eyes. It’s well understood that one serving of conventionally produced food won’t cause harm. The big question is whether or not long-term consumption is problematic.

Way back when, foods were simply organic or they weren’t. As more organic products have become available, the issue became more complex. To keep up with the variations, the USDA has designated specific nomenclature for organic foods. For example, a food labeled “100 percent organic” contains all organic ingredients; the “organic” designation means that all agricultural ingredients must be organic. Foods with 70 percent organic ingredients can only state that they’re “made with organic ingredients.” For the complete breakdown of organic labeling definitions, visit the USDA Organic Certification web page.

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