All Posts By Dana Angelo White

5 Things You Didn’t Know You Could Do with Watermelon

by in Healthy Recipes, July 14, 2017

It’s no surprise that watermelon is a healthy, hydrating and gorgeous looking summer fruit, but there are more uses for this melon than you might realize.

 

Tap It

With the help of a few power tools, turn a watermelon into a tasty adult beverage and a serving vessel. It’s one-stop shopping with a batch of this punch for 275 calories per serving.

Recipe: Watermelon Punch Keg (pictured above) Read more

Camp Essentials: Ideas for Meals and Snacks

by in Food & Nutrition Experts, Kid-Friendly, July 5, 2017

Summer has arrived, which means school is out and camp is in. If you’re sending little ones off to day camp this summer, it’s time to think about what the heck they’re going to eat. Since camp meals can be more stressful than packing school lunches, we’ve got some tasty, healthy and easy ideas to make meal prep feel like you’re on vacation.

 

Be Cool

Summer heat is great for camp, but not for food safety. Keep lunches cool with plenty cold packs to prevent the growth of unhealthy bacteria. Even if lunches are to be stored in refrigeration, it’s a good idea to bring an ice pack along to make sure everything stays cool during transport. Reusable ice packs are an affordable option, or use a pre-frozen 4-ounce water bottle. Read more

Gift and Recipe Ideas for Father’s Day

by in Healthy Recipes, June 7, 2017

Still pondering the perfect Father’s Day gift? Fishing for creative gift and recipe ideas that scream D.A.D.? Whatever kind of celebration you are planning, we’ve got you covered.

 

For the Grill Master

Hard pressed for a grill but tight on space? Ever planned a backyard BBQ and have it end in a wash out? Dad will love the multipurpose T-fal OptiGrill in sunshine and rain

for everything from grilled salmon to pressed sandwiches. Read more

Nutritionist-Approved Cocktails to Sip All Summer Long

by in Food & Nutrition Experts, Healthy Recipes, June 2, 2017

Popular summer cocktails like margaritas and daiquiris can tip the scales at more than 600 calories per serving. Since moderate alcohol consumption (1 drink a day for ladies and 2 for men) can be beneficial to heart health, cocktail lovers should seek out sensible sippers. So here are 6 cocktails that keep things on the skinny side for the summer season.

Whiskey

Fresh mint leaves and only 1 teaspoon of sugar provide an abundance of cool and minty flavor in a refreshing Mint Julep (pictured above).  Read more

Nutritionist-Approved Favorites From Food Network Chefs

by in Food & Nutrition Experts, Healthy Recipes, May 15, 2017

 

The nutrition experts at FoodNetwork.com have the inside scoop on the healthiest and most delicious recipes. The chefs at Food Network are renowned for their culinary creations, but what many folks don’t realize is that many of their recipes are nutrition powerhouses. Here are five recipes from Food Network stars that get rave reviews for both taste and nutrition.

 

Ina’s Guacamole Salad (pictured above)

This may be the most flavorful, colorful and nutrient-filled salad in the Hamptons. This dish features antioxidant rich veggies, plus healthy fats from avocado, protein from beans and 9 grams of hunger-fighting fiber per serving. Serve it as a side dish with grilled meat or fish, or with tortilla chips as an appetizer. Read more

Must-Try Recipe: Shakshuka

by in Healthy Recipes, April 22, 2017

It’s pronounced “shak-shoo-ka” but no matter how you say it, it’s downright scrumptious. Hailing from North African and the Middle East, this spicy tomato-based sauce with poached eggs may also be known as eggs in purgatory. You’ll be shocked how easy it is to prepare this vitamin-rich dish, so get your shakshuka on with these tips and tasty recipes

 

Health perks

Most shakshuka recipes include tomatoes, onions, peppers and. This veggie-heavy one-pot meal is relatively low in calories, but is packed with fiber and inflammation-fighting antioxidants. Canned tomatoes are commonly the star ingredient, which are higher in the antioxidant lycopene than fresh varieties. Eggs add healthy protein to make for a satisfying meal. Experiment with other protein-rich add-ins like beans and small portions of meat to add interest texture and flavor. Some recipes call for hefty doses of salt, so consider swapping in salt-free flavor boosters like spices and fresh herbs. Read more

Trend Alert: Riced Vegetables

by in Food News & Trends, Healthy Recipes, April 8, 2017

Remember when “rice” was a just a noun? Nowadays it’s become a verb and an adjective to describe one of the hottest veggie trends around. These tiny chopped pieces of vegetables have found their ways into all kinds of recipes, and can offer a hefty dose of nutrients.

 

Riced revolution

What started out as a new-fangled way to use cauliflower has evolved into so much more. Cauliflower “rice” came on the scene as a popular grain free alternative to rice. Riced cauliflower can be used as a standalone side dish or as the star ingredient in traditional recipes like fried rice and baked casseroles. Using a vegetable-based option in place of grains lowers the calories and carbohydrate counts but this swap isn’t completely a nutrition win. If you compare one cup of cooked rice to the same portion of cooked cauliflower, rice contains more fiber, protein and magnesium but less vitamins K and C.

As with many food trends, the “riced” craze has continued to advance. Instead of just cauliflower, ricing other veggies like sweet potatoes, broccoli and carrots has begun to gain momentum. There is also more variety of flavored rice vegetables. Check ingredient lists as some are seasoned with flavorings that can up the sodium content. Read more

Ask An Expert: Is Couscous Healthy?

by in Food & Nutrition Experts, April 2, 2017

Ever wondered about couscous…what is it? How it’s prepared? And most of all, is it healthy? A registered dietitian weighs in on this commonly misunderstood food.

 

What Is Couscous?

Often mistaken for an ancient grain, couscous is actually tiny pieces of wheat pasta – basically a mixture of semolina flour and water. Popular in cuisines around the globe, couscous is quick cooking and can be used like rice to accompany a wide variety of foods.

Traditional or Moroccan couscous are very small grains that can be prepared by simply adding hot water or broth and allowing to steep for 5 minutes to allow the liquid to be absorbed. Larger round pieces of couscous known as Israeli or pearled can be cooked in boiling liquid. This version takes slightly larger to cook and has a more robust and pleasantly chewy texture. Read more

Healthy Cooking Mistakes You’re Likely Making

by in Food & Nutrition Experts, March 24, 2017

Cooking more healthfully doesn’t need to be a painful task, but if you’re falling into these common traps you may be fighting an uphill battle. How many of these habits do you need to break?

 

You don’t measure high calorie ingredients

There is such thing as “too much of a good thing.” While there’s no disputing that ingredients like olive oil, nuts, avocado and nut butters offer healthy fats, inflated portions can lead to inflated waistlines. When each tablespoon of olive oil contains 120 calories and 14 grams of fat, and each cup of cooked whole grain pasta adds up to 200 calories, it’s important to measure out these ingredients to avoid a calorie overload.

 

You defrost meat on the countertop

Is it common practice for you to toss that package of frozen chicken on the countertop before you leave for work? This is a food safety nightmare waiting to happen. The drastic temperature shift from freezer to counter rolls out the red carpet for potentially harmful bacteria and foodborne illness. Instead defrost meat safely overnight in the fridge. Or if you’re in a time crunch, defrost in the microwave then cook immediately. Read more

Myth or Fact? Cooking with Aluminum Foil Is Bad for Your Health

by in Food & Nutrition Experts, February 26, 2017

Lining sheet pans, packets for the grill, and storage in the fridge are just a few of the uses that aluminum foil can have in your kitchen. But can cooking with foil can have dangerous consequences?

Myth or Fact?
Over the years, rumors have swirled about high levels of aluminum leading to health risks including Alzheimer’s and kidney disease. The truth is aluminum is all around us (even in the water supply), and regular contact does not appear to cause problems. Thankfully, the body has numerous mechanisms in place to help rid the body of excess amounts of this metal. That said, consumption of toxic levels over time could eventually be dangerous to bone, brain, muscle and other tissues.

In the Kitchen
Is there a concern for the home cook? It may depend on how you use foil in your kitchen. There’s not enough research to date to say use of foil will pose immediate harm. Studies that do exist reveal that wrapping cold or cooled foods in foil for storage did not lead to leeching of any aluminum. However, a study published in 2012 did find that cooking with aluminum at high temps and the use of acidic foods, salt, and spices did perpetuate a greater amount of leeching. Read more

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