All Posts By Amy Reiter

Amy Reiter is a writer and editor based in New York. A regular contributor to The Los Angeles Times, she has also written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, Glamour, Marie Claire and Wine Spectator, among other print publications, as well as for websites including The Daily Beast, MSN, Babble, AOL/Huffington Post and Salon, where she was a longtime editor and senior writer.

Nutrition News: Greek Yogurt Is in Schools (But Is It Beneficial?) and Junk Food Does Serious Damage

by in Food News, April 24, 2015

 Greek Yogurt Goes to School

They may study English, Latin, Spanish, French or Mandarin in their classrooms, but in the cafeteria, more American school kids will soon be eating Greek — Greek yogurt, that is. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has announced plans to offer Greek yogurt as a protein-rich alternative to meat in school lunches nationwide beginning this fall. The move follows a 12-state pilot program, which helped the USDA determine that there was sufficient student demand for Greek yogurt. And its higher level of protein than conventional yogurt was enough to earn Greek yogurt a permanent place in the national school lunch program. Robert Post, the senior director of nutrition and regulatory affairs for Greek yogurt maker Chobani, which was involved in the pilot program, says he is thrilled about the nationwide rollout. “The success of the pilot is a testament to the growing popularity of Greek yogurt and USDA’s recognition of the value of Greek yogurt as part of a healthy meal for kids,” Post said. Read more

Nutrition News: Dining Out Risks, When to Eat, and How Healthy is Your Snack Bar?

by in Food News, April 17, 2015

 Another Reason to Cook at Home

Most of us enjoy a nice meal in a restaurant now and then, but a new study has found a link between eating out and hypertension. Researchers at Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore found that young adults (18 to 40 years old) who ate meals away from home had an elevated rate of prehypertension and hypertension. Even eating out one extra time, the researchers found, boosted the odds of prehypertension by 6 percent. The study, conducted via a survey of university students of Asian descent, underscores how important it is to be aware of the salt and calorie content of the foods you eat, according to the research team. Read more

Nutrition News: What Kind of Vegan Are You, Eggs and Diabetes, Brain Benefits of Leafy Greens

by in Food News, April 10, 2015

All Vegans Are Not Equal

Which kind of vegan do you think is more likely to stick to the diet: those who eschew animal products for ethical reasons or those who do it for health reasons? Ticktock … ticktock … Time’s up! The answer is ethical vegans. According to a study recently published in the journal Appetite and cited by Time, people who are vegans for ethical reasons follow the diet for about eight years, on average, and are also more likely to eat soy and vitamin supplements. Those who go vegan for health reasons, by contrast, stick to the diet for about five-and-a-half years, but they do eat more fruits and fewer sweets than ethical vegans.

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Nutrition News: Nuts About Nuts, Calorie-Cutting Rice Hack, Kraft and Diet Group Part Ways

by in Food News, April 3, 2015

 

Nuts to You

Do you nix nuts from your diet because you think they’re fattening and hard to digest? Recent studies would indicate that precisely the contrary is true, Jane E. Brody writes in The New York Times, calling nuts and peanuts “some of nature’s most perfect and healthful foods.” Not only have multiple studies indicated that nuts reduce our risk of death at any age from any cause, but several studies also show that nuts can help people lose weight and maintain the loss — perhaps because nuts are so satisfying or because of the way the body breaks them down. Plus, because nuts are high in dietary fiber, they may actually aid digestion and prevent constipation. Nuts are packed with vitamins, antioxidants and beneficial phytochemicals, making them, Brody says, “a nutritional powerhouse.” Read more

Nutrition News: Diageo to List Nutrition Info, Paleo Diet Debated, Changes at the Supermarket

by in Food News, March 27, 2015

Cocktail calorie count

Ever wonder how many calories are in your cocktail or your pint of beer? Soon that will be easier for diet-watching drinkers to discern. Alcoholic-beverage behemoth Diageo PLC — the global giant behind Johnnie Walker Scotch whiskey, Smirnoff vodka, Guinness and countless other products — says that, starting in a few months, it will begin including information about nutrition, including calories and fat content, and alcohol content per serving on its U.S. product labels and online. This is an industry first, according to the company. After the labels’ U.S. rollout, they will be introduced in Europe. Diageo CEO Ivan Menezes told the Wall Street Journal the company wants “to provide alcohol and nutrition information that consumers can quickly understand, instead of expecting them to do the math.”

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Forget Frying: Day Care Food Gets a Healthy Makeover

by in Food News, March 22, 2015

Should our youngest children be scarfing down greasy fried food in the middle of their day? Is there any reason we shouldn’t be feeding our toddlers tofu? Read more

Kraft Singles Seal, Healthy-Eating Education and a Food Photographer’s Secrets

by in Food News, March 20, 2015

Cheese-Product Goodness?

And the first food to get a “Kids Eat Right” nutrition seal from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics — a trade group of registered dietitians and others working in the field of nutrition — is Kraft Singles, the plastic-wrapped “Pasteurized Prepared Cheese Product” formerly known as a “pasteurized process cheese food.” That is, until the FDA blocked it from using that label because it contained an ingredient — “milk protein concentrate” — that was not allowed in products so designated. On its website, Kraft insists its Singles are colored with “spices, not food coloring” and “now” made “with no artificial preservatives.” But one parent and nutrition advocate tells The New York Times she is “really shocked” at the endorsement. She is not alone. A former member of the academy told The Times that, when he heard about the group’s decision to award the product its first seal, his “jaw just hit the floor” and his “eyebrows just hit the ceiling.” Ouch. Read more

Nutrition News: Scary Dairy Discovery, Pesco-Vegetarianism Pays Off and a Colorful Key to Healthy Food Choices

by in Food News, March 13, 2015

Got (Antibiotics in Your) Milk?

What’s in your milk? Possibly antibiotics that are not supposed to be there. The FDA spot-checked milk from about 2,000 dairy farms and, according to a new report, found six unauthorized drugs, including florfenicol, ciproflaxacin and sulfamethazine, in a small but alarming number of samples. The antibiotics found are not among those the agency usually tests for, NPR reports, because none of them have been approved for use on lactating cows; the regulations are aimed at preventing drug residues from entering the milk supply. But farmers may be using these unauthorized drugs to reduce illness in the herds while skirting detection. The FDA may have difficulty tracking the farms responsible for the antibiotics-tainted milk, but it has now launched an effort to prevent use of the unauthorized drugs on dairy cattle. Read more

Nutrition News: Fast Health, Fat-Fueled Sports and Another Reason to Drink Coffee

by in Food News, March 6, 2015

In this week’s news: A study finds benefits in intermittent fasting; a high-fat diet may be good for athletes, but not everyone; and if you drink coffee, your arteries may be spick-and-span. Read more

One Fish, Two Fish — Try a New Fish

by in Food News, March 4, 2015

We’re used to hearing dire predictions about our oceans and to feeling mounting concern about the seafood on our plates. But recent months have brought exciting news for fish lovers, cooks and people who care about seafood sustainability, an inspiring story of recovery and renewal. Read more

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