Are Pears the New Apples?

by in Healthy Recipes, October 13, 2015

Head to your local market and you’ll find delicious pears piled high right next to all those apples. Many recipes are substituting crunchy pears in place of apples. It appears that pears are everywhere — but are they the new apples?

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Chai Apple Pie Smoothie Bowl

by in Healthy Recipes, October 12, 2015

Fall is officially here, and what better way to kick off the season than with a rich and creamy, no-added-sugar Chai Apple Pie Smoothie Bowl. Laced with heart-healthy spices, and naturally sweetened with fruit, this protein- and fiber-rich fall-inspired smoothie bowl is sure to warm your heart — and power your day. Read more

Homemade Fast-Food Alternatives for Kids

by in Healthy Recipes, October 12, 2015

French Fries

Are your kids big fans of fast food? Try these healthy, homemade and kid-friendly alternatives. Read more

What Celebrities Eat for Lunch

by in Healthy Tips, October 11, 2015

Want more proof that celebrities are just like us? They eat lunch! Yes, it’s true. It’s not just us plebs who take time to consume a midday meal. Health-conscious celebrities also take out their Tupperware and foil to wrap up their lunches — or mindfully (or not) order off the menu.

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Taste Test: Gluten-Free Chocolate Chip Cookie Mixes

by in Taste Test, October 10, 2015

Among Friends Darcy’s Delish Old Fashioned Chocolate Chip Cookie Mix
Making your own gluten-free flour blends takes time and patience to get the hang of. And we get that some folks just aren’t great in the baking department. Sometimes it’s OK to call upon premade gluten-free mixes to get the job done — and save you lots of grief! Numerous gluten-free chocolate chip mixes have been popping up on market shelves. We gave them a whirl, and here’s what we found. Read more

Nutrition News: White Pasta Alternatives, Dietary Guidelines and Sustainability and Social Media’s Nutritional Impact

by in Food News, October 9, 2015

Beyond White Pasta

White pasta can spike blood sugar and lead to an increased risk of weight gain, Type 2 diabetes and other health issues. So look no further if you’re searching for a few healthy alternatives to white pasta, because U.S. News Health & Wellness reporter K. Aleisha Fetters has some suggestions: Why not try whole-wheat pasta, quinoa pasta, buckwheat noodles, sprouted-grain pasta, spelt pasta or brown-rice pasta instead? “Luckily, the more heat white pasta receives from critics, the more food manufacturers work to up their alternative-pasta game with whole grains, heart-healthy fiber, filling protein, and more vitamins and minerals than you’ll find in a salad,” she wrote. That is lucky!

Sustainability Beyond the Scope?

Should the new version of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans factor in sustainability, considering not only Americans’ health and well-being but also that of our planet? A group of public health and sustainability experts argued last week in the journal Science that they should — echoing the recommendation made by a federal advisory committee of nutritionists in April. But lawmakers and administration officials apparently disagree. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell announced Tuesday that the updated dietary guidelines to be released in December will not consider environmental sustainability — which would have endorsed a diet with fewer animal-based foods. Some congressmen, who had argued that sustainability was outside the guidelines’ scope, cheered the decision on Wednesday.

Instagram for Breakfast

Parents may feel as if social media is consuming their teens’ lives, but it may also be affecting what those teens consume. A cross-sectional study of about 9,000 middle- and high-school students conducted by Canadian researchers and published in the British Journal of Nutrition concluded that the more time teens spent on social media sites — like Instagram, Vine, Snapchat, WhatsApp, Facebook and Twitter — the more likely they were to make poor nutritional choices, like not eating breakfast or drinking sugary beverages and energy drinks. Teens who used social networking sites for less than one hour a day had a 67 percent higher chance of drinking sugary beverages, while those who used them for just under two or five hours had a 90 percent and a 3.3-fold increase, respectively, in the odds of doing so, according to the researchers. Gulp.

Produce Picks: Squash

by in In Season, October 9, 2015


Squashes are technically fruits, since they have seeds and are the fruit of the plant that bears them. They are primarily broken down into two types, the latter of which is now in prime season:

  • Summer squashes, whose skins are still tender and edible, are typically harvested in the late spring and summer. They include zucchini (green), yellow, pattypan and cousa.
  • Winter squashes, whose seeds and skins have fully matured and need to be cooked before they are eaten, are harvested in the late summer and fall. Examples include butternut, acorn, spaghetti squash and pumpkins.

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The Chef’s Take: Cabbage, Speck and Grape Salad at Eataly

by in Dining Out, October 8, 2015

These days, when you enter a hip restaurant, you can expect the menu to offer at least one trendy take on kale, Brussels sprouts or even cauliflower. But cabbage? Cabbage is still waiting for its moment in the sun. We encounter this leafy green, rich in vitamins K and C, most often as a co-star in sauerkraut, slaws and old-fashioned stews. We celebrate with cabbage just one day a year — on St. Patrick’s Day — and even then it’s overshadowed by fatty cuts of slow-cooked corned beef. But from a chef’s perspective, cabbage has a lot to offer: It usually clocks in at around $1.24 per pound, whereas kale or Brussels sprouts might cost you double at some marketplaces. It’s also highly abundant around this time of year, when produce supplies start to thin out.

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5 Healthy Ways to Bake with Pumpkin Puree — Fall Fest

by in Healthy Recipes, October 8, 2015

If you’re daunted by the idea of baking with fresh pumpkin, well, we can’t really blame you. Splitting, gutting and skinning a whole pumpkin with nothing more than a carving knife and a large spoon to scoop out the seeds is a time-consuming process — and completely unnecessary when you have pure pumpkin puree on hand. Luckily, one-half cup of unsweetened canned pumpkin contains roughly 50 calories per serving, which means it’s a great way to add moisture and creaminess to your favorite baked goods for very little additional fat or sugar. Better yet, it’s a quick and convenient method for imbuing each bite of cookie, muffin or pie with comforting fall flavor. Here are five easy ways to work rich pumpkin puree into your favorite baked goods, from classic pumpkin pie to cheesy pumpkin biscuits.

Pumpkin Muffins
Instead of relying on fat for flavor, Ellie Krieger’s better-for-you muffins get their distinctively warm spiciness from molasses, dark brown sugar and a total of four ground spices: cinnamon, ginger, cloves and nutmeg. Low-fat buttermilk, canned pumpkin and just a touch of canola oil instill a moist tenderness in each of these wholesome pumpkin-seed-flecked muffins.

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Chicken and Butternut Dumplings

by in Healthy Recipes, October 8, 2015

Mmmm, chicken and dumplings. It’s a big bowl of comfort food: fluffy, soft dumplings that float atop a stick-to-the-ribs chicken stew bubbling underneath.   Read more