How Much Fruit Should You Eat?

by in Grocery Shopping, Label Decoder, February 14, 2013

blueberries
The serving size for any food isn’t “one size fits all.” It depends on numerous factors like the food group, shape and nutrients provided. I’ll layout your standard fruit serving sizes and delve into the nitty-gritty details of some not-so-traditional foods (like those squeezable fruit pouches) so you’ll know what one serving of fruit actually is.

The Recommendations
According to the USDA’s MyPlate, any fruit or 100% fruit juice can make up a serving of fruit. Fresh, canned, frozen, freeze-dried, dried, whole, cut up and pureed fruit all count. How much fruit you need each day varies by gender, age, and level of physical activity. Here are the guidelines for men and women ages 19 and older:

Women:

  • 19 to 30 years: 2 cups
  • 31 years and older: 1 ½ cups

Men:

  • 19 years and older: 2 cups

Basic Fruit Servings
As a general rule, one cup of 100% fruit juice or ½ cup of dried fruit (like apricots or raisins) counts as 1 cup. Here are examples of what counts as 1 cup of fruit:

  • Apple: ½ large (3.25″diameter), 1 small (2.5″ diameter), 1 cup sliced, chopped or cooked
  • Applesauce: 1 cup
  • Banana: 1 large (8-9” long) or 1 cup sliced
  • Cantaloupe: 1 cup of cubed melon or 2 medium wedges (about ¼ of a medium melon)
  • Grapes: 1 cup whole or sliced or 32 seedless grapes
  • Grapefruit: 1 medium (4″ diameter) or 1 cup sectioned
  • Orange: 1 large (3-1/16″ diameter)
  • Peach: 1 large (2-3/4″ diameter), 1 cup sliced or 1 cup canned and drained peaches
  • Pear: 1 medium (2 ½ per pound), 1 cup sliced or 1 cup canned and drained pears
  • Pineapple: 1 cup sliced, diced, or crushed, 1 cup cooked or 1 cup canned and drained
  • Plum: 3 medium or 2 large, or 1 cup sliced or cooked
  • Strawberries: 8 large, 1 cup whole, halved or sliced, fresh or frozen
  • Watermelon: 1 cup cubed or 1 small wedge (1″ thick)

A few items not mentioned by the USDA include:

  • Fruit purees: ½ cup = 1 cup of fruit
  • Fruit nectar: 8 fluid ounces = 1 cup of fruit
  • Freeze-dried fruit: 1/2 cup = 1 cup of fruit

Packaged Foods
There are other foods where fruit is an ingredient, such as squeezable fruit pouches, fruit juice blends or fruit snacks. The manufacturers of these foods should provide consumers with information about how many cups of fruit per serving. For example, for a fruit juice blend the label should read: 8 fluid ounces provides the equivalent of ½ (or 1) cup fruit serving of the 2 cups recommended each day.

As a consumer, it’s important to keep your eyes peeled for this info on the food package. Some foods may say they’re “made with real fruit”, but there’s just not enough fruit to count in your daily recommended cups. It’s also important to realize that many processed forms of fruit (like fruit-filled pastries or fruit snacks) may contain many more calories than 1 piece of fresh fruit and are laden with additives and preservatives. So even if the food claims to provide ½ or 1 cup of fruit, you’re also ingesting a boatload of unhealthy stuff. Here’s a great video from Today.com that shows how some “fruit” labels are misleading.

Bottom Line: You can get your servings of fruit each day from a variety of sources. Weigh the good and the bad of each item before you pop it in your mouth. Some packaged goodies may come with a lot of unhealthy baggage, even if they do contain fruit.

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  7. [...] to the USDA’s Dietary Guidelines, adults should eat at least 2 servings of fruit each day. And canned fruit can absolutely be just as healthy (if not more) than its fresh [...]

  8. [...] According to the USDA’s Dietary Guidelines, adults should eat at least 2 servings of fruit each day. And canned fruit can absolutely be just as healthy (if not more) than its fresh [...]

  9. [...] According to the USDA’s Dietary Guidelines, adults should eat at least 2 servings of fruit each day. And canned fruit can absolutely be just as healthy (if not more) than its fresh [...]

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