Herb of the Month: Chives

by in Healthy Recipes, In Season, August 4, 2012

chives
We’re kicking off August with an herb that’s been historically used to help promote male fertility. Learn why chives are so good for you, then try our mouthwatering chive recipes.

Chives Basics
Chives are related to the garlic, leeks and onions and are native to Asia, North America and Europe. It’s thought that Marco Polo tasted chives and brought them back home to Europe where they became popular.

This fragrant slender herb has a milder flavor than onions and garlic. The plant grows as lofty stems adorned by gorgeous purple flowers.

Nutrition Info
One tablespoon of chopped chives has 1 calorie and vitamins A and C, vitamin K, folate and manganese. Chives also contain quercetin, a heart protecting antioxidant.

The juice from chives has also been used as an insect repellent—give it a try and let me know how it works out.

What To Do With Chives
This herb can be found fresh when in season; the entire chive (from leaf to bulb) is edible. You can also find it in dried and frozen forms. Since chives have a milder flavor, they’re perfect to add to soups, dips, mashed or baked potatoes, fish, seafood dishes and omelets. Heat destroys their delicate flavor,  so add chives to dishes at the last minute. To maximize their taste, thinly slice, chop or snip with kitchen shears before using.

Chives is a herb that can be easily grown at home—learn how.

Shopping Tip: Choose chives with a uniform green color. Avoid those with signs of wilting or browning. Store in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to one week. Rinse well before using to remove any dirt or debris.

Recipes to try:

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Comments (1,788)

  1. Michael says:

    I used to love eating wild chives. I would rather eat them raw than mix them into a dish.

  2. ESSIAC Tea says:

    Well… I also used to love eating chives as researches have revealed the result that chives help reduce the risk of prostate cancer, by as much as 50 percent.

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