In Season: Cantaloupe

by in In Season, August 14, 2009

cantaloupe
Growing up, I had a pet cat who was obsessed with cantaloupe. I was never sure if cantaloupe was acceptable feline fare, but she lived to be 14, so I guess it didn’t hurt. One thing I do know is that the cool, juicy melon is definitely good humans! Scoop some up now while it’s in season.

What, Where & When
Muskmelons (that is, orange cantaloupe and green honeydew) are available from July through August and sometimes as late as mid-October in warmer climates. Related to squash, watermelon and cucumbers, these fruits are savored for their juicy goodness and sweet punch of flavor. The melons we call “cantaloupes” here in the U.S. are very different from the European version, which you won’t find very often here in this country (keep that in mind when traveling overseas and see if you can find some to try).

Cantaloupes grow on long vines along the ground. They have a beige outer skin with a webbed appearance that’s often speckled with green. While you only eat the insides, always wash the whole melon well before cutting into it — if not, you can contaminate the inside with your knife when you’re slicing. Under the peel, you’ll find peachy-orange, aromatic flesh (the good stuff!) and a center cavity filled with seeds -– just scoop those out before eating.

Nutrition Facts
One cup of diced cantaloupe has 60 calories, 2 grams of fiber and 1 gram of protein. The bright orange color means it’s full of beta-carotene (the antioxidant form of vitamin A). A cup also provides 108% of your daily vitamin C needs.

What To Do With Cantaloupe
The mildly sweet flavor and slightly tender texture of cantaloupe makes the melon a fun addition to smoothies, sorbets or just a simple fruit salad. It also balances well with thin slices of salty prosciutto.

Think beyond the chunks by adding some melon to salsas or purée pieces into a velvety smooth soup. Next on my recipe testing list: a super-sweet cantaloupe marmalade.

Shopping Tip: Choose melons that are round, firm and heavy with juice. A sweet-smelling aroma lets you know they are ready. Keep whole melons on the counter for 1 to 2 days or in the refrigerator for up to 5. Once you cut it, keep pieces wrapped up in the fridge for 2 to 3 days.

TELL US: How do you love your cantaloupe?

More posts from .

Similar Posts

Three Cheers For the Healthiest Berry Desserts

Independence Day may be over, but the summer berry season is just hitting its stride. If your kitchen is bursting with all kinds of juicy gems, here&#...

Comments (26)

  1. hello!,I love your writing so so much! percentage we keep up a correspondence more about your article on AOL? I require an expert on this house to solve my problem. May be that is you! Looking ahead to peer you.

  2. Thanks for a marvelous posting! I really enjoyed reading it, you will be a great author.I will remember to bookmark your blog and will eventually come back sometime soon. I want to encourage one to continue your great work, have a nice day!

  3. Mui Camell says:

    I am a keen letter writer, and would like to know if there is anyway of creating a letter writing community by this. Creative letter writers writing to creative letter writers the globe over. I will reply to all those who wish to write and not just receive. 51 Lavender Sweep, London SW11 1DY. England

  4. stock loans says:

    Thanks for your write-up. I would also like to opinion that the very first thing you will need to perform is check if you really need fixing credit. To do that you simply must get your hands on a copy of your credit history. That should really not be difficult, because government mandates that you are allowed to acquire one totally free copy of your credit report yearly. You just have to request that from the right individuals. You can either browse the website for your Federal Trade Commission and also contact one of the major credit agencies specifically.

  5. My dog likes a piece of cantaloupe every now and then too — but only if it's room temperature. But you do have to be careful feeding certain fresh fruits and veggies to your pets (for instance, dogs shouldn't eat grapes or onions). They may be toxic.

  6. Love that idea! I have a bbq this weekend to attend. I'm going to bring fruit skewers so at least there's a summer-fresh, healthy option among the chips and dips galore.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>