In the News: Warning for Tea Drinkers, Starbucks Goes Green, Teen Weight Loss Surgery & More

by in Food News, July 3, 2009

From this week’s headlines: Starbucks ups their eco-friendly practices, more weekly food recalls, tips for creating dinner faster and weight loss surgery for teens.

Tea Drinkers Beware
If you’re a tea lover like me, you may want to read up on the findings from this new study. Although rich in antioxidants and lower in caffeine than coffee, tea contains compounds that block your body from absorbing iron — definitely not good news since iron is the most common nutrient deficiency in the U.S. No need to ditch tea altogether, but it’s probably best to stick to 1 to 2 cups a day max.

Another Chain Goes Eco-Friendly
You won’t hear me complain when major food corporations become more eco-friendly (in May we told you about McDonald’s steps towards using cage-free eggs). Now, Starbucks plans to make establishment’s more energy efficient and to prioritize recycling. No word on whether these greener practices will reduce their coffee prices. Would this make you more likely to shell out $4 for a cup of Joe?

Top Recalls of the Week
This week there is possible E.Coli in beef and salmonella in Dunkin Donut’s Dunkaccino and hot chocolate drinks. A Colorado meat company recalled 380,000 pounds of steak and roasts — don’t forget to check your freezer for the possibly tainted products. As for Dunkin’ Donuts, they stopped selling two of their popular drinks after a supplier’s equipment tested positive for salmonella. And maybe it’s a little off-color, but I read one of the funniest headlines about this story while researching: “America Gets the Runs on Dunkin.” Ha!

Help for Beginner Home Cooks
The Canned Food Alliance recently launched Mealtime.org, a site aimed at helping us prep dinner faster and easier so we have more time to spend with loved ones at the table. The site gives step-by-step guidelines on how to makeover your kitchen — from perking up the pantry to increasing counter space to smart shopping.

Make Your Own Baby Food & Save
I loved making baby food for each of my three kids; they all couldn’t get enough of my veal stew (pureed, of course). These moms in Pennsylvania have figured out the secret — that creating your own baby food is cheaper, more nutritious and gives the child more meal options than the jarred stuff. Have you ever made your own?

Teenage Weight Loss Surgery for Kids?
Where I live, children under 16 aren’t allowed to seek weight loss surgery, but that doesn’t stop moms from coming to my office with young teenagers close to 400 pounds and demanding bariatric surgery. I’m not a fan of promoting children’s weight loss surgery. It seems that some parents just throw their hands up in defeat (“it’s too tough!”) without ever trying to teach their kids traditional healthy eating and exercise techniques. Do you feel that teens should be getting weight loss surgery?

More posts from .

Similar Posts

This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

In this week’s news: The produce aisle takes a page from the junk food playbook; breakfast proponents get a wake-up call; and new thinking on s...

Comments (9)

  1. maris says:

    Ha that is terrible, the Dunkin headline! But so scary and gross that you can contract E.Coli from a hot chocolate – blechh!

  2. Krikri says:

    The information that tea inhibits iron is really disturbing. For long it has been the staple for many – used mainly for its antioxidants. But a cup or two, like you say, may not hurt much.

  3. Krikri says:

    The information that tea inhibits iron is really disturbing. For long it has been the staple for many – used mainly for its antioxidants. But a cup or two, like you say, may not hurt much.
    Oops…forgot to say great post! Looking forward to your next one.

  4. Denise in CT says:

    My twin sister (who is 35) had lap band surgery several months ago. Watching her go through the process has been agonizing. Her life will never be the same. There are so many life altering consequences to those procedures that I don't think a parent should agree to this on behalf of their children. For example, my sister can no longer enjoy a beverage with her meal. She cannot eat bread, carbonated beverages, and most meats. I wouldn't be able to do it. If parents insist on pursuing surgery, they should be required to first attend a program, such as Weight Watchers (I have no affiliation), with their child for a full year. Diet and exercise work. Period. They may realize that success is possible without surgery, albeit not immediate. If they do go forward with the surgery a little education about diet for both parent and child would be extremely helpful in attaining long term success.

  5. Heather says:

    My own personal ideal believe that the only way for weight loss (program, diet and excercise, or surgery) to become a life style change is if you really want to see that change and you make the steps. My father has gone through the full gastric bypass and while this past year and a half has been inspiring, I also know that it is within me to loose the weight on my own. I made a promise to myself to do everything I could to avoid the surgery but it I tried and failed by the time I was 25 then I would consider this surgery as an option. I said this at last year at 23 and have since lost 40 pounds on my own. I know i have a long road ahead of me but my life is better for it.

    Being a teen and overweight is rough and your self esteem is extremely low. I think that if the teen is proactive about wanting the surgery and presents a case that is based on research and understanding of the risks it should be considered. That being said, parents who force or push their child into surgery as a quick fix is not acceptable.

    Again, every case is different and I hope that they find happiness in whatever happens

  6. Heather says:

    ***Please excuse the previous post…I failed to proof read before submitting…sorry

    My own personal belief is that the only way for a weight loss (program, diet and excercise, or surgery) to be successful, is if you really want to see the change and actually make the steps toward a goal.

    My father has gone through the full gastric bypass. While, this past year and a half has been inspiring, I also know that it is within me to lose the weight on my own.

    I made a promise to myself to do everything I could to avoid the surgery. But if I tried and failed by the time I was 25 then I would consider this surgery as an option. I said this at last year at 23 and have since lost 40 pounds on my own. I know I have a long road ahead of me but my life is better for it.

    Having been an teen and overweight, I know it is rough and my self esteem was extremely low. I think that if the teen is proactive about wanting the surgery and presents a case that is based on research and understanding of the risks, it should be considered. That being said, parents who force or push their child into surgery as a quick fix is not acceptable.

    Again, every case is different and I hope that they find happiness in whatever happens

  7. greenteaweightloss10 says:

    thats really informative and useful post thanks for sharing such a valuable post,love your site, looking forward for more
    Green Tea Weight loss

  8. green tea says:

    I just like the valuable information you supply for your articles. I will bookmark your blog and check once more right here frequently. I’m relatively sure I will be told lots of new stuff right right here! Best of luck for the next!

  9. Thanks a lot for sharing this with all of us you really realize what you are talking approximately! Bookmarked. Kindly additionally talk over with my web site =). We may have a hyperlink exchange contract between us

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>