7 Ways to Show Apples You Love Them

by in Healthy Recipes, September 14, 2014

apple pie
Fall may not be officially here yet, but that doesn’t mean you can’t get psyched about the star fruit of the season.

Rustic Apple Pie with Dried Cherries (above)
Think of this less like your grandmother’s apple pie and more like a free-spirited galette with a healthier side. Apple slices and dried cherries — tossed in brown sugar and cinnamon — fill the semi-whole-grain crust. Read more

Meet Nutritional Yeast (That’s “Nooch” For Short)

by in Trends, September 13, 2014

nutritional yeast
The name sounds strangely antiseptic, and the powdery flakes look suspiciously like what you’d sprinkle into the goldfish tank. But that does not deter certain cooks and bloggers (mostly vegetarian and vegan ones) from singing the praises of nutritional yeast. So what exactly is this supplement and what has it done to deserve a spot on the health food hot list? Read more

How to Make Healthy Cooking a Family Affair

by in Kid-Friendly, September 12, 2014

salad-stuffed popovers
Enlisting kids to help out in the kitchen can have numerous benefits beyond an extra pair of little hands assisting us:

  • Cooking teaches children useful skills, including cooperation, coordination, math (fractions and more) and problem-solving.
  • Cooking is a bonding experience for parents and kids.
  • Cooking an array of things, including fruits and vegetables, helps children develop a healthy relationship with the foods they eat, which is associated with better health and eating habits as they become teens and adults.

Read more

5 Easy Meals To Fuel After-School Activities

by in Healthy Tips, Kid-Friendly, September 11, 2014

asian chicken quinoa salad

As every parent knows, the season of running from school to countless extracurricular activities is upon us. How best to get everyone fed along the way? Avoid the temptations of the drive-through by having one of these nutritious and easy-to-prepare meals instead.

Asian Chicken Quinoa Salad (above)
Shredded rotisserie chicken paired with protein-rich quinoa will help soothe tired muscles after a long day. Kid-friendly vegetables, including carrots and sugar snap peas, are also in the mix, which gets a delectable sesame-soy dressing. Read more

The Chef’s Take: Roasted Root Vegetable Breakfast from Zoe Nathan

by in Chefs and Restaurants, September 10, 2014

roasted root vegetables with egg
Many people who crowd into chef Zoe Nathan’s Huckleberry Café in Santa Monica come for her phenomenal morning pastries and baked goods, including the likes of chocolate-almond muffins, blueberry scones and lemon-kumquat teacake. But Nathan — who is a veteran of San Francisco’s cult favorite bakery, Tartine – was actually trained as a chef, not a baker, and cooked at restaurants like bld in Los Angeles and Lupa in New York City before convincing her now-husband and business partner Josh Loeb to hire her as a pastry chef at his restaurant Rustic Canyon. “I had never done desserts before,” she recalls. “At Tartine, I had done breakfast breads and lots of savories, so I kind of lied and told him I had pastry chef experience, and then when I got the job, I had to go to my parent’s house to teach myself how to bake!”

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Salad of the Month: Chilled Noodles with Avocado and Cucumber

by in Amy's Whole Food Cooking, September 9, 2014

salad

Chilled noodle salads make perfect warmer weather meals as they are simultaneously refreshing and satisfying. Here, the earthy flavor of soba noodles, made from a combination of buckwheat and wheat, are enlivened by tangy rice-vinegar-pickled cucumbers and a zippy dressing made with ginger and shiso. Read more

Free of Gluten and Dairy, But Always Full of Flavor

by in Cookbooks, September 8, 2014

deep-dish pizza
When Silvana Nardone’s son Isaiah was ten, he was diagnosed with an allergy to gluten and dairy. His first reaction was, “What am I going to eat?” But lucky for him, his mom was more than up to the challenge. “He told me the one thing he really wanted to be able to eat was cornbread, so I spent the next two months trying — and failing — to mimic the exact taste and texture of gluten-full cornbread,” says Nardone, who is also a contributor to Healthy Eats. Eventually, she nailed it and was inspired to keep finding ways to make Isaiah gluten- and dairy-free versions of all his favorite foods. In her latest cookbook, Silvana’s Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free Kitchen, she shares what she has learned. Read more

Looking to Reel Them In? 5 Seafood Dishes with Kid Appeal

by in Kid-Friendly, September 7, 2014

shrimp stir-fry
Earlier this summer, the Food and Drug Administration announced revised recommendations for children, suggesting two to three servings of low-mercury fish a week. But it can take some enticing to get the younger set excited about digging into seafood. Here are five recipes that are sure to lure — and might even entice a few seafood-phobic grown-ups too.

Shrimp: Shrimp Stir Fry (above)
Kids love this high-protein crustacean – and stir-frying shrimp with a colorful mix of vegetables offers a quick way to turn them into an eye-catching dinner. If you’re confused about whether to choose wild or farm-raised shrimp, check out the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch guide for shrimp.

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Taking the Stress Out of Lunchbox Meals

by in Kid-Friendly, September 6, 2014

smoked turkey
It’s the time of year when kids head back to the classroom — and parents head back to the kitchen for another year of lunchbox anxiety. But there’s no need for packable meals to inspire stress. Here are simple lunches worth a spot in any brown bag, plus some time-saving packaged add-ins that parents can actually feel good about. Read more

This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, September 5, 2014

kale
In this week’s news: Some Americans — but not all — are eating better; junk-food cravings may be all in our minds; and back-to-school may mean back-to-better-meals.

Does the One Percent Eat More Kale?
A 12-year study conducted by Harvard School of Public Health has determined that, although there’s still room for improvement, many Americans have bettered their eating habits over the past decade, upping their consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and healthy fats. That’s the good news. The bad? That positive trend was true only among those higher on the socioeconomic ladder and didn’t hold for lower-income individuals, making them vulnerable to health conditions such as obesity, heart disease and diabetes. “Declining diet quality over time may actually widen the gap between the poor and the rich,” study co-author Frank Hu told the Associated Press. Read more

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