5 Healthy Ways to Use Canned Fruit

by in Healthy Recipes, April 20, 2015

Canned options can be a healthy and budget-friendly way to incorporate more servings of fruit into your diet. Try using canned fruit in fun and exciting ways, such as these five inspiring recipes.

Fruit Cocktail 

Turn canned fruit into a frozen treat that’s way better for you than a sugary ice pop.

Recipe: Ree Drummond’s Frozen Fruit Cups (pictured above) Read more

Butternut Carrot Macaroni ‘n’ Cheese

by in Healthy Recipes, April 19, 2015

 

Macaroni and cheese needs only three things to be great: creamy sauce, toothy noodles and melty cheese. But even though the math is simple, those few ingredients, especially when they come from a box, can quickly add up to over 800 milligrams of sodium per 1 cup serving, depending on brand. And depending on how many servings you actually eat. Read more

Are You Aware of These Health Hazards in Your Kitchen?

by in Food Safety, April 18, 2015

When you hear about an outbreak of foodborne illness, it usually involves a large food corporation or chain restaurant. But you may be just as likely — perhaps even more likely — to encounter food contamination in your own kitchen. “In general our food is very safe, but there are also things consumers can do help prevent problems,” says Jeannie Sneed, Ph.D., research professor at Kansas State University and author of a new study about how consumers’ food-handling habits can lead to food contamination.

Here, the biggest culprits in the kitchen — and what you can do to minimize the risk. Read more

Nutrition News: Dining Out Risks, When to Eat, and How Healthy is Your Snack Bar?

by in Food News, April 17, 2015

 Another Reason to Cook at Home

Most of us enjoy a nice meal in a restaurant now and then, but a new study has found a link between eating out and hypertension. Researchers at Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore found that young adults (18 to 40 years old) who ate meals away from home had an elevated rate of prehypertension and hypertension. Even eating out one extra time, the researchers found, boosted the odds of prehypertension by 6 percent. The study, conducted via a survey of university students of Asian descent, underscores how important it is to be aware of the salt and calorie content of the foods you eat, according to the research team. Read more

Steel Cut Oats Are Trending

by in Healthy Recipes, April 17, 2015

Steel-cut oats are trending! According to fitness and nutrition app MyFitnessPal, members are eating steel-cut oats more than ever — tracking of the breakfast food is up 18.5 percent over last year. With a high fiber content, oatmeal can help prevent spikes in blood sugar, making it a great option for breakfast. But what about regular old rolled oats? They’re still good for you too! Steel-cut oats might be more satisfying, however, thanks to that high fiber content, which keeps you fuller longer and lets you eat a smaller portion and still feel satisfied. Additional data from MyFitnessPal shows that the average user breakfast of 265 calories contains about 14 grams of sugar, or 56 calories of sugar, which means that about 21 percent of people’s breakfast calories are coming from sugar. The World Health Organization recommends that less than 10 percent of total calorie intake be from added sugar. At just 2 grams of sugar per 1/2 cup, this makes steel-cut oats a great choice for your morning meal, instead of sugary cereal or instant oatmeal packs. Plus, this versatile grain is also great when you give it a savory spin by using it for risotto. Read more

Are Collards the New Kale?

by in Healthy Recipes, April 16, 2015

If 2014 was the year of the kale, then 2015 is the year of the collard. The leafy green vegetable has seen a big marketing push from Whole Foods — and for good reason. Collards actually beat kale when it comes to nutrients: They pack more calcium and iron than kale. Plus, they contain 5 grams of fiber and 4 grams of protein per cup (cooked), compared with kale’s 3 and 2 grams, respectively.

So what can you do with collards? Happily, they’re just as versatile as kale. Try the hardy greens in these delicious dishes. Read more

Eating for Exercise: What, When, Why and How Much?

by in Fitness, April 16, 2015

Like a car, your body needs fuel — the right kind in the right amount — in order to work properly. “You can’t put 10 miles worth of gas in your car and expect to drive for 30 miles without breaking down,” reasons Alissa Rumsey, a registered dietitian, nutritionist, and certified strength and conditioning coach in New York City. “The same goes for your muscles.”

For that reason, Rumsey recommends not working out on a completely empty stomach. She suggests timing your exercise for three to four hours after a meal or within an hour of a small snack that provides some carbohydrate and protein (like half a banana with a teaspoon of peanut butter). And skip anything that’s too high in fat or fiber — both digest slowly, which can interfere with your workout. Read more

Cooked Versus Raw: Some Veggies Like the Heat

by in Healthy Tips, April 15, 2015

Talk to raw-food advocates and they’ll insist that food is most nutritious if it never hits temperatures above 116 degrees. However, the theory that vegetables are healthier raw isn’t always true. The nutrients in some vegetables — including the five mentioned below — become more bioavailable, or readily available for your body to absorb, once they’re cooked. Read more

6 Surprising Ways to Use Kefir

by in Healthy Tips, April 14, 2015

Pronounced “keh-FEAR”, this fermented milk drink is expanding in the yogurt aisle. It has vitamins A and D and calcium in amounts comparable to those in milk, making it a good way to help get your daily recommended servings of dairy. Kefir is brimming with gut-friendly bacteria, which help keep your intestines happy. It’s versatile in the kitchen and can be enjoyed in a variety of everyday recipes. Try it these seven ways. Read more

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