Nutrition News: Dining Out Risks, When to Eat, and How Healthy is Your Snack Bar?

by in Food News, April 17, 2015

 Another Reason to Cook at Home

Most of us enjoy a nice meal in a restaurant now and then, but a new study has found a link between eating out and hypertension. Researchers at Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore found that young adults (18 to 40 years old) who ate meals away from home had an elevated rate of prehypertension and hypertension. Even eating out one extra time, the researchers found, boosted the odds of prehypertension by 6 percent. The study, conducted via a survey of university students of Asian descent, underscores how important it is to be aware of the salt and calorie content of the foods you eat, according to the research team. Read more

Steel Cut Oats Are Trending

by in Healthy Recipes, April 17, 2015

Steel-cut oats are trending! According to fitness and nutrition app MyFitnessPal, members are eating steel-cut oats more than ever — tracking of the breakfast food is up 18.5 percent over last year. With a high fiber content, oatmeal can help prevent spikes in blood sugar, making it a great option for breakfast. But what about regular old rolled oats? They’re still good for you too! Steel-cut oats might be more satisfying, however, thanks to that high fiber content, which keeps you fuller longer and lets you eat a smaller portion and still feel satisfied. Additional data from MyFitnessPal shows that the average user breakfast of 265 calories contains about 14 grams of sugar, or 56 calories of sugar, which means that about 21 percent of people’s breakfast calories are coming from sugar. The World Health Organization recommends that less than 10 percent of total calorie intake be from added sugar. At just 2 grams of sugar per 1/2 cup, this makes steel-cut oats a great choice for your morning meal, instead of sugary cereal or instant oatmeal packs. Plus, this versatile grain is also great when you give it a savory spin by using it for risotto. Read more

Are Collards the New Kale?

by in Healthy Recipes, April 16, 2015

If 2014 was the year of the kale, then 2015 is the year of the collard. The leafy green vegetable has seen a big marketing push from Whole Foods — and for good reason. Collards actually beat kale when it comes to nutrients: They pack more calcium and iron than kale. Plus, they contain 5 grams of fiber and 4 grams of protein per cup (cooked), compared with kale’s 3 and 2 grams, respectively.

So what can you do with collards? Happily, they’re just as versatile as kale. Try the hardy greens in these delicious dishes. Read more

Eating for Exercise: What, When, Why and How Much?

by in Fitness, April 16, 2015

Like a car, your body needs fuel — the right kind in the right amount — in order to work properly. “You can’t put 10 miles worth of gas in your car and expect to drive for 30 miles without breaking down,” reasons Alissa Rumsey, a registered dietitian, nutritionist, and certified strength and conditioning coach in New York City. “The same goes for your muscles.”

For that reason, Rumsey recommends not working out on a completely empty stomach. She suggests timing your exercise for three to four hours after a meal or within an hour of a small snack that provides some carbohydrate and protein (like half a banana with a teaspoon of peanut butter). And skip anything that’s too high in fat or fiber — both digest slowly, which can interfere with your workout. Read more

Cooked Versus Raw: Some Veggies Like the Heat

by in Healthy Tips, April 15, 2015

Talk to raw-food advocates and they’ll insist that food is most nutritious if it never hits temperatures above 116 degrees. However, the theory that vegetables are healthier raw isn’t always true. The nutrients in some vegetables — including the five mentioned below — become more bioavailable, or readily available for your body to absorb, once they’re cooked. Read more

6 Surprising Ways to Use Kefir

by in Healthy Tips, April 14, 2015

Pronounced “keh-FEAR”, this fermented milk drink is expanding in the yogurt aisle. It has vitamins A and D and calcium in amounts comparable to those in milk, making it a good way to help get your daily recommended servings of dairy. Kefir is brimming with gut-friendly bacteria, which help keep your intestines happy. It’s versatile in the kitchen and can be enjoyed in a variety of everyday recipes. Try it these seven ways. Read more

Healthiest Fast Food Breakfasts

by in Dining Out, April 13, 2015

With many Americans eating breakfast on-the-go, fast food joints have been increasing their offerings. You can now find healthy options at almost every menu. Here are five choices for fewer than 4oo calories each. Read more

10 Reasons We’re Still Not Over Kale

by in Healthy Recipes, April 12, 2015

Last week on April Fools’ Day, Ina Garten posted a photo of green-frosted, kale leaf-garnished cupcakes on Instagram with the caption: “These Kale Cupcakes are a healthy twist on one of my favorite cupcake recipes. They look absolutely gorgeous and are the perfect treat for spring! And the best part is, they’re so delicious kids won’t even guess that there’s a vegetable hidden inside.” And I’ll admit it: She totally got me for a second. Ina’s hilarious April fool pretty much sums up how out-of-control the kale trend has become.

But that doesn’t mean we should all turn against kale. It has revolutionized salad for me — the hearty greens make it a much more satisfying meal than romaine or spinach ever did. And it has helped transform the smoothie from a fruity sugar bomb into a snack or breakfast that can actually be good for you. Here are 10 more reasons why we’re still not over this trendy lettuce. Read more

5 Ways Cheese Is Broccoli’s Best Friend

by in Healthy Recipes, April 11, 2015

Broccoli and Cheddar-Stuffed Potato SkinsIf you’re asking me, broccoli and cheese go together just like peanut butter and jelly or milk and cookies. When creamy melted cheese, particularly cheddar, crosses with the green vegetable, a little magic happens. Of course, adding a little dusting of cheese can punch up nearly anything, but these recipes prove that broccoli and cheese share a beautiful union that can’t be denied (and still manages to be healthy). Though the mention of cheese might raise a few red flags for the health buff, broccoli and cheddar share a friendship of good influences, as a little dose of the good stuff sure goes a long way. Especially if getting your little ones to eat this cruciferous vegetable is a nightly challenge, uniting it with a much-loved indulgence is a sure-fire way to please. Read more

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