Tag: wine

Enter for a Chance to Win a Zig Zag Wine Bottle Holder

by in Contests, November 1st, 2012

Zig Zag Wine Bottle Holder GiveawayHaving a wine bottle holder is a great way to show off a favorite bottle and add a touch of class to your kitchen. This funky wine bottle holder by Emilia Ceramics will reliably nestle your wine in between pours and serve as a great kitchen conversation piece — especially at the Thanksgiving table.

You can buy your own Zig Zag Wine Bottle Holder here or enter in the comment field below for a chance to win one. To enter: Tell us your favorite food and wine pairing in the comments. We’re giving away a wine bottle holder to three lucky, randomly selected commenters.

Read official rules before entering

Fright Potions for Halloween

by in Drinks, Holidays, October 26th, 2012

shrunken head strawsFor Halloween I often advise people to find one of the many wines available with scary names, such as Sin Zin, Dead Arm or Devil’s Lair. Given the festive nature of fright night, however, it can also be rewarding to whip up a big-batch wine that is sure to give your guests the creeps — in a good way.

Red Punch: The color of villainy, of course, is blood red, so the easiest way to add fright to your night is to mix up a simple Red Wine Punch from Food Network Magazine.

Sangria: With a little more work, you can make a traditional red sangria, whose name appropriately derives from sangre or blood in Spanish. I show you how in this video.

Go Green: Equally impressive would be to surprise your guests with a concoction the color of ghastly green. Obtain some green food coloring and add it to Paula Deen’s Mimosa Punch or Giada’s Apple and Mint Punch.

Accessorize with Sandra’s Shrunken Head Straws

Which Wines and Oils Do I Use When Cooking? — Fix My Dish

by in How-to, September 15th, 2012

red and white wine
Twice a month we’re giving readers a chance to ask Food Network Kitchens’ advice about an issue they’re having with a dish. They can’t reformulate a recipe for you, but they’re happy to help improve it.

Question: I’m just not wine-smart — I don’t know a dry wine from a non-dry one. It sure would be helpful if the chefs would say what kind of wine they’re using in a recipe, not brand specific, but if it’s a Chardonnay or a Merlot. And when they speak of using a finishing oil on their food, what does that mean? – Karen Shelton

Answer: Don’t stress about what kind of wine to cook with. It’s pretty straightforward: If it tastes good in the glass, it’ll taste good in the dish. As a basic rule of thumb, think white wines for delicate flavors like shellfish or most vegetables. Use red wines for robust flavors in red sauces and braised meats.

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On the Blogs: Rachael’s New Cookbook, Orange Wine and the Next Greek Yogurt

by in Community, June 7th, 2012

rachael rayPublishers Weekly: Rachael Ray just released her latest cookbook, The Book of Burger (coming soon to Food Network Store). The “smart book” features QR codes that provide readers additional cooking information when scanned.

TIME: Mickey Mouse ditches junk-food. The Walt Disney Co. is the first major media company to ban junk food advertisements in an effort to diminish sugary temptations and improve kids’ eating habits. 

Associated Press: Schools rise above pink slime. The vast majority of National School Lunch Program states are refusing the product known as “lean finely textured beef,” and fast-food chains and supermarkets are following suit.

Food Republic: Will Greek yogurt soon be replaced? Hailing from Iceland, skyr has a similar tang, but is actually a “fresh skim-milk cheese, strained to a whipped custard consistency.”

Chicago Sun-Times: Do you prefer your red or white? Or how about orange? Also known as “freaky whites,” orange wines are now trending.

$7 Brings You Instant Wine Coolness on St. Patrick’s Day

by in Drinks, Holidays, March 15th, 2012

wine for st. patricks dayIf you crave coolness, sometimes the best plan is to swim against the stream. Everyone eating steak? Order the shrimp scampi. Friends dressing up? Go ahead, wear your ripped jeans.

And with St. Patrick’s Day being so famously beer-soaked, your against-the-grain cred will come from drinking wine. Not any old vino, mind you, but one particularly suited to this casual, joyous occasion: Vinho Verde (VEEN-yoh VEHR-day), a light white wine from various native grapes in Portugal.

Here are five reasons why

Two Lessons From Perfect Wine

by in Drinks, March 1st, 2012

romanee conti wineIf there’s one estate in the world that can make perfect wine, it is Domaine de la Romanée-Conti (“DRC” to insiders) in France’s Burgundy region. So special is its Pinot Noir that tourists make pilgrimages there just to gaze thirstily at the vineyards behind its low stone wall. It is so coveted that some careful collectors will scrawl an “X” on bottles that they have drained to prevent counterfeiters from reusing them.

This is the kind of juice that Miles from Sideways would pursue to the end of the earth, even if it meant making like Thelma & Louise and rocketing his red Saab over a canyon into the blue beyond.

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Does a $10,000 Bottle of Wine Taste Like $10,000?

by in Drinks, January 25th, 2012

expensive wine bottle
When you write about wine, you sometimes get to taste the really expensive stuff. I’m not talking filet mignon or even white-truffle expensive. I’m talking splurging like Diddy-in-a-diamond-hoodie-on-a-yacht expensive.

When a collector shares one of these bottles with me, friends later ask, “Does it taste like [insert obscenely expensive price]?”

The honest answer: It doesn’t, at least not to the untrained palate, and probably not even to most trained palates.

The lesson here is that while the price is often reflective of a wine’s quality, it is so only up to a point. And even when a wine is of high quality — from the best grapes handled by the most talented hands — it doesn’t mean that you are going to automatically taste its full price. In fact, some of the most-prized bottles can evoke qualities — think soy sauce or pencil lead or even a barnyard in August — that are off-putting to the uninitiated.

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Why Screw Caps Are No Longer a Stigma

by in Drinks, January 12th, 2012

screw cap wine bottle
If anything should convince you of my position on screw caps, consider the stated location on my Twitter profile: “wherever corks pop and caps snap.”

Yes, I give equal status to corks and screw caps because both are perfectly fine bottle enclosures. Just a generation ago, the thought of packaging wine like soda pop would have prompted connoisseurs to raise their corkscrews in a vampire cross.

These days enthusiasts know that quality wine is often packaged with twist-off tops, making the wine not only easier to open but also protecting it from cork taint, which is that basement-floor, mildewy smell that experts estimate affects at least 5 percent of all cork-enclosed bottles.

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5 Myths of Buying Wine in Supermarkets

by in Drinks, December 7th, 2011

supermarket wine
“Who is buying this stuff?” I always wonder when I pass by one of the wine aisles at a certain 24-hour supermarket in California’s Silicon Valley. Past aisles of everyday wine and not far from a display of pet flea and tick collars and a table of diapers, is a display cabinet of bottles of fine wine, some of it under locked glass. You have to wonder: Do the Mark Zuckerbergs and Larry Pages of the world really need to make 4 a.m. runs for Heitz Cabernet?

Apparently so, or else the supermarket wouldn’t stock it — or at least stock so much of it. What it also reminds us is that a great deal of the world’s wine is purchased at supermarkets and, contrary to common conception, many of these stores sell more than supermarket wine.

Five myths about supermarket wine »

Wines for a Special Occasion — Outsmarting Wine

by in Drinks, November 18th, 2011

special occasion wine
With the holidays looming, the wine mind naturally turns to occasions where we can break out the special stuff. Here are four of my favorite options:

Older Champagne: While most sparklers are meant to be drunk soon after release — when bubbles are vigorous and the taste shades to the citric and snappy — a good wine merchant can steer you to a bottle of mature Champagne (i.e., 10 years or more of bottle age). Its delicate bubbles and haunting, hazelnut flavors will make your important occasions seem that much more memorable.

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