Tag: vegetables

Parmesan Fennel Gratin — The Weekender

by in Recipes, March 21st, 2014

Parmesan Fennel Gratin - The WeekenderDuring the winter months, when most of the farmers markets in my area are closed, I find that I almost always default to the same five vegetables at the grocery store. We can eat only so much broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, cabbage and kale, however, before edible fatigue sets in.

So I’ve been making a point to reach for vegetables outside of the standard five. I picked up a bag of snow peas recently, which made for a nice treat. Beets have made several appearances. And fennel has been hopping into my shopping basket a lot lately.

Fennel is actually a great vegetable to have in the crisper drawer, because it can do a variety of things. You can mince it and saute it into soups and stews in place of celery. You can shave it finely and dress it with a simple vinaigrette. It makes a very nice quick pickle. And as I learned recently, it works beautifully as a gratin.

I used Ina Garten’s recipe for Parmesan Fennel Gratin. She is the queen of simple, lush dishes, and this recipe did not let me down. She has you core the bulbs and cut them into two to four wedges. They get a dose of wine-fortified stock, are dotted with butter and covered with foil. You slide the pan into a hot oven and let them braise until they are entirely tender.

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Comforting Cauliflower — Fall Fest

by in In Season, November 7th, 2013

Roasted Cauliflower RisottoIt’s November, and for all we know, you’re already knee-deep in beef stew, spaghetti and meatballs, and chicken noodle soup. We get it. Fall means comfort: stews so tender the meat is falling off the bone and casseroles so cozy you get knocked into a nap at the last bite.

Here’s the thing: Comfort food doesn’t need to be synonymous with meat. Believe it or not, even the most unassuming veggies have the power to cure us of all our woes. Leave it to cauliflower — and these recipes — to bring you all kinds of comfort this season.

Stir a pot of risotto to sultry completion, this time with roasted cauliflower florets and sliced almonds adding that extra crunch. Food Network Magazine’s Roasted Cauliflower Risotto (pictured above) can work as a rich main dish, or as a smaller side.

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Veggies on the Down-Low

by in Family, October 18th, 2013

Veggies on the Down-LowKids aren’t always wild about veggies as a side dish. So I try and add diced or pureed veggies to everything I can, including main dishes like meatloaf and desserts like brownies. Or take this pasta dish: It’s rigatoni with meatballs, but I added diced red peppers during the last minute of cooking. Then I slathered on the marinara sauce and meatballs (cooked separately). With all the chunks of sweet tomatoes incorporated into the sauce, the kids didn’t even notice the peppers. But they did get a boost of vitamin C.

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Turnips Revisited — Fall Fest

by in In Season, October 10th, 2013

Crispy Turnip Gratin for Food Network's Fall FestPut down those potatoes, people. Here at FN Dish, we’re spending a little quality time with one of the most under-appreciated veggie around: the turnip. Odds are it’s not the star of your fall spread. Heck, maybe you’ve never even cooked this root vegetable before. Well, now that turnips are in season, they’re smaller, sweeter and bound to woo you.

More closely related to peppery arugula and radishes than beets or even potatoes, turnips come with loads of benefits. Not only do turnips add a quick zip to sides, mains and more, they’re also inexpensive, meaning you can load up on them at the store. Turnips are loaded with nutrients, especially if you hang on to the greens. Saute, roast, mash or blanch your turnips. Hey, you can even take ‘em raw in a salad.

Turnips are capable of making a statement on the table. Food Network Magazine’s Turnip Gratin with Almonds (pictured above) comes out of the oven bubbling and sprinkled with toasted breadcrumbs, while Herbed Leg of Lamb with Roasted Turnips gives turnips a celebratory edge.

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Greens with Spiced Butter and Fresh Ricotta — The Weekender

by in In Season, Recipes, October 4th, 2013

greens with ricottaI am of the belief that collard greens are perpetually misunderstood. Most people I know think these greens can be served only one way — paired with a hunk of smoked meat and cooked until they’re limp and olive-colored.

Don’t get me wrong. I have nothing against this particular approach and have always appreciated a serving of long-braised greens. It’s just that I think it’s time to broaden our approach to the humble, healthy collard. Who knows, maybe we’ll make it as popular as its cousin kale!

My collard conversion started a few years back. I had gotten yet another bunch in my CSA share and needed desperately to free up some space in the crisper. Without time for a long braise, I decided to treat the collard greens like Swiss chard.

I cut them into thin ribbons and sauteed them in olive oil with lots of slivered garlic until they were just limp. My first bite was uncertain, as I assumed they’d be tough and chewy (because why else would you need to cook them for hours?). But I was delighted to discover they were tender and had married deliciously with the garlic.

Before you start cooking, read these tips

The Better Side of Broccoli

by in Family, September 3rd, 2013

The Better Side of BroccoliIf there’s one complaint I hear over and over from Foodlets readers, it’s about getting kids to eat more vegetables. And to that I have one piece of tried-and-true advice: Roast them. I’ve roasted carrots, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, asparagus and now broccoli. It’s so easy and so delicious; I can’t believe I haven’t tried it before. Here’s what you do: Slather a few cups of broccoli florets with olive oil, sprinkle with sea salt and roast in a hot oven (around 400 degrees F).

When the edges are crispy, but the centers still soft, you know it’s done. Encourage anyone who’s had a bad broccoli experience in the past to try just one bite. They may not immediately become a fan, but over time, this is the recipe that’ll win ‘em over.

Get the full recipe for Roasted Broccoli here.

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4 Ways to Make Kids Excited About Zucchini

by in Family, August 14th, 2013

Zucchini Chocolate Chip CookiesThis time of year, nothing is easier to find (and afford) than zucchini. Finding ways to get the good stuff into your kids, however, can be more elusive. I’ve tried all sorts of things (some hits, many misses) and these are the most popular zucchini dishes according to our three kids:

  • Stovetop Pork and Rice with Zucchini: If you can make rice, you can make this — and your kids will swoon. Just add mustard, cooked cubes of pork and chicken broth to plain brown rice. Throw the zucchini in for the last few minutes. Tada!

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Kid-Size Crudites: Personal Veggie Cups

by in Family, July 10th, 2013

Kid-Size Crudites: Personal Veggie CupsTired of hearing yourself say things like, “Eat your veggies so you can grow up to be big and strong”? Also, just how big and strong are we aiming for here? Because I ate quite a few veggies as a kid and pretty much became an exact replica of my mother. All well-meaning parental messages aside, I loved this popular Pinterest party trick so much that I tried it at my own dinner table. It was an absolute hit.

You can use store-bought salad dressing, make your own or combine a mix of something like ranch with a dollop of Greek yogurt to even out the good-for-you versus not-so-good-for-you ratio. Either way, pour an inch or two into your smallest juice glasses, then arrange a colorful selection of raw veggies on top, vertically.

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3 Ways to Make Kids Say, “Yay, Asparagus!”

by in Family, May 25th, 2013

3 Ways to Make Kids Say, Kids don’t always love eating the green stuff. But instead of offering less of it, one of my favorite techniques is adding things they do like to any given dish. Take asparagus. Our toddler loves lemons, so it’s a go-to trick for encouraging her to try new foods. (It also works for previously refused foods, but I’m sure that never happens at your place.)

1. Our favorite way to make asparagus is sauteed in a pan with olive oil and a handful of peas. Add a few shavings of salty Parmesan cheese on top and let the kids squeeze their own lemon at the table.
2. Or try asparagus on homemade pizza with big drops of fresh ricotta cheese, a drizzle of olive oil, salt, pepper and oregano.
3. Never underestimate the power of roasting veggies. A pan of asparagus with 2 tablespoons of olive oil and a dash of salt will be amazing after 10 minutes of roasting at 425 degrees F. You might even get a cheer, but I always settle for at least a bite.

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Best 5 Asparagus Recipes

by in Recipes, April 4th, 2013

Roasted AsparagusGiven that most produce is available in grocery stores year round, it’s easy to forget that fruits and vegetables indeed have seasons in which they’re at their peak of freshness, when they’re the most colorful and flavorful — and not to mention the most economical. For asparagus, that time to shine is early-to-middle springtime, which means that the bundles at farmers’ markets and supermarkets right now are some of the best you’ll find all year. Celebrate the season’s bounty by putting asparagus to work in quick, family-friendly recipes like vegetable side dishes, healthful salads and quick pastas. We’ve rounded up Food Network’s top-five asparagus dishes — a mix of traditional and creative takes on this simple-to-make vegetable — ideal for casual weeknight suppers and dressed-up dinners alike. Check out our favorite picks below, then browse Food Network’s entire collection of asparagus recipes to find more fresh inspiration.

5. Corn and Asparagus Salad — In just 20 quick minutes, Paula dresses tender asparagus and vibrant corn with a sweet and tangy vinaigrette for a light side dish that complements any hearty entree.

4. Quinoa Salad With Asparagus, Goat Cheese and Black Olives — Think of quinoa as a blank canvas through which you can showcase favorite ingredients and textures, like Bobby does in his five-star recipe by adding to it trimmed asparagus, fresh thyme and creamy goat cheese.

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