Tag: Turkey

Best 5 Ways to Dress Up Your Thanksgiving Turkey

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 18th, 2014

Maple Roasted Turkey with Sage, Smoked Bacon and Cornbread StuffingThe Thanksgiving turkey is the centerpiece of your holiday spread and has the potential to be the most-remembered component of the feast, so when it comes to picking a recipe to help you make the bird, you want one you can trust. That’s where Food Network comes in. Stick to these classic, tried-and-true recipes to transform your turkey into a holiday showstopper — best of all, each is a can-do pick from one of your favorite chefs, like Anne Burrell, Alton Brown and Bobby Flay. Read on below to get their top turkey recipes, then visit Thanksgiving Central for more holiday inspiration.

5. Big, Brined Herby Turkey — The secret to Anne’s super-moist bird is her brining method. She lets the turkey chill in a salt water-herb bath for three days so the meat has a chance to absorb flavor before it cooks.

4. Good Eats Roast Turkey — With a 5-star rating and nearly 5,000 user reviews, Alton’s no-fail turkey is the ultimate in Thanksgiving simplicity. After brining the bird, he roasts it first at 500 degrees F so it develops a golden-brown exterior, then lowers the temperature as the meat turns moist and finishes cooking.

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Turkey Taboos: What NOT to Do This Thanksgiving

by in Holidays, How-to, November 10th, 2014

When it comes to preparing the Thanksgiving bird, everyone has an opinion. We all have our favorite turkey, whether it’s Aunt Sally’s or Alton Brown’s 5-star fan favorite. There are some words of wisdom, though, that apply no matter what turkey recipe you choose. Chef Ariane Daguin, cofounder of D’Artagnan, a leading gourmet food purveyor, shared her essential tips for what NOT to do when it comes to the turkey. With these in your back pocket, your beloved bird will taste better than ever. Read more

Thanksgiving Turkey 101: Your Guide to Roasting Your Best-Ever Bird

by in Holidays, November 5th, 2014

How to Roast TurkeyThe Thanksgiving turkey: It’s the centerpiece of your holiday table and perhaps the most-craved component of the feast. But for many, turkeys are also the trickiest part of the menu to make, thanks in part to the fact that it’s likely been a year since you’ve cooked a bird of this size. This holiday season, however, tackle your turkey fears once and for all with the help of Food Network’s go-to turkey-roasting guide; all it takes is a few good-to-know tips and simple steps to turn out your juiciest, crispiest-skinned bird yet. Read on below to learn the basics of cooking a turkey, then check out How to Roast Turkey to get all of the details.

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Best 5 Easy Turkey Dinner Recipes

by in Recipes, May 13th, 2014

Spicy Turkey Meatballs and SpaghettiWhile turkey usually takes center stage come Thanksgiving, this family-friendly meat is worthy of a starring role all year long, as it’s surprisingly simple to prepare — especially when it’s not being roasted whole for a holiday — and endlessly versatile. Just like chicken, turkey is a culinary blank canvas that pairs well with nearly all flavors and ingredients, and there’s no shortage of ways to prepare it, from fried to sauteed to simmered. To get new ideas for using this go-to protein, check out Food Network’s top-five easy-to-do turkey dinner recipes from the Neelys, Tyler, Ina and more chefs.

5. Turkey and Quinoa Salad — A complete meal in a bowl, this good-for-you salad boasts fluffy toasted quinoa, herbed turkey cutlets and a colorful combination of tomatoes and cucumbers.

4. Turkey Sausage and Peppers — The key to this recipe lies in the two-part cooking process for the sausages. After broiling them until golden brown, simmer them in a bold saute of peppers, fennel and tomatoes until juicy, and finish with fragrant basil.

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The Sloppy Lo — The Weekender

by in Recipes, September 6th, 2013

The Sloppy Lo - The WeekenderDuring my first few years of elementary school, my family lived in Los Angeles. Because it was almost always warm enough to eat outside, my school didn’t have a cafeteria. Instead, we just had an outdoor courtyard with plastic picnic tables and a small window through which hot lunches were dispensed.

I was mostly a brown-bag kid in those days, but occasionally, when something on the monthly menu particularly spoke to me, my parents would give me a dollar and let me buy lunch. I always asked to buy lunch on the days when they served sloppy joes.

I think part of the reason had to do with how it was served. The saucy meat came packaged in a little aluminum tray, covered tightly with foil. On top, they’d stack a waxed paper dish that held the bun and a plastic cup of applesauce or fruit cocktail. You’d go to your seat with a carton of milk, a napkin and a plastic spork to assemble your very own sandwich. I loved it.

Before you start cooking, read these tips

Turkey and Blistered Green Chile Burgers — The Weekender

by in Entertaining, Holidays, May 24th, 2013

Turkey and Blistered Green Chile BurgersFor the last few years, my husband and I have been in the habit of visiting friends in Northampton, Mass., for the long Memorial Day weekend. We make the trek from Philadelphia on Saturday morning, arriving sometime in the early afternoon, very ready for several days of catching up, early cocktail hours and lazy meals.

One thing that’s always particularly fun about these weekends is that these friends take their grilling very seriously. We live in an apartment without a stitch of outdoor space, so I’m always excited to have an opportunity to cook outside on a real, live flame (my everyday cooktop is an ancient, soul-less electric stove).

Two years ago we experimented with grilled pizzas (a huge success!), and last summer we cooked up a buffet of sausages, from-scratch veggie burgers and a mountain of grilled vegetables. As our visit approaches, I’ve had my eyes open for new recipes that might work well on their deluxe grill.

Before you start cooking, read these tips

Headliner Thanksgiving Turkey — The Communal Table

by in Community, Holidays, November 14th, 2012

Bobby Flay's Black Pepper-Pomegranate Molasses Glazed TurkeyIn honor of Thanksgiving, we’re kicking off our second annual Communal Table on Food Network, an event that we opened up to the entire food community. Experts from the industry are “pulling up a chair” to our table and offering readers their favorite recipes for appetizers, sides, salads, breads, mains, desserts and cocktails.

As we near a certain Thursday, we’ve all got the same thing on the brain: turkey. It’s that one dish per year that you simply cannot fail, and the one dish on your table that requires the most TLC.

This year, as you start dog-earing recipes and staking out techniques, rest assured that we’ve got your back when it comes to the bird. You see, while we’re all for the classic roasted turkey, a la Alton Brown’s Good Eats Roast Turkey, we’ll also welcome a new take with open arms.

Enter: Bobby Flay’s Black Pepper-Pomegranate Molasses Glazed Turkey. For added flavor, it’s rubbed with fresh sage and roasted garlic before being glazed with zesty Dijon mustard, horseradish and all that pomegranate goodness.

See what our friends are bringing to the table

Spicy Turkey Lollipops — The Weekender

by in Recipes, September 7th, 2012

spicy turkey lollipops
Every home cook has her backup, never-fail dinnertime ingredient. When in doubt, my mom sautés chicken tenders in olive oil with a bit of garlic and serves them on top of salad. My younger sister relies on sweet potatoes and cans of black beans to save the day when kitchen inspiration is scarce. Me? I’m good as long as there’s a pound of ground turkey in the freezer.

When I want something super-easy, I make turkey burgers with chopped onion and frozen peas stirred in (who doesn’t like a burger that also contains a serving of veggies?). If I have a little more time to play with, I mince up a carrot and a bit of onion in the food processor, stir it into the turkey with an egg and some smashed stale crackers (something we always seem to have on hand) and bake it in a loaf pan. Nights when I feel like I need some meditative kitchen time, I make turkey meatballs and cook them up in a batch of vegetable-laden broth.

All those applications are solid weeknight cooking. Sometimes, however, I’d like to be able to dress up my ground turkey and make it a little more presentable for guests and far-flung family members who find their way to my table on occasion. Just as I was pondering inventing my own company-worthy ground turkey dish, I spotted Melissa d’Arabian’s Spicy Turkey Lollipops.

Before you start rolling your meatballs, read these tips

Turkey Tenderloin — Off the Beaten Aisle

by in How-to, April 17th, 2012

chopped smoked turkey burgers
If you think you’ve done nearly everything a cook can with boneless, skinless chicken breasts, it might be time to talk turkey.

Other than the big bird at Thanksgiving and ground turkey when they’re craving a healthier burger, most people overlook turkey.

Fair enough. Ground turkey can be dry and tasteless. And who has time to roast a bird (or even a massive breast) most nights of the week?

But the turkey tenderloin — a thick strip of meat cut from between the bird’s breasts — turns out to be a convenient, delicious and healthy alternative.

Because the tenderloin doesn’t get much of a workout when the bird is alive, the meat is particularly tender.

And like chicken breasts, it is incredibly versatile, taking well to the grill, skillet or oven and working well with any flavor or marinade.

Get the recipe for Chopped Smoky Turkey Burgers

Alex’s Turkey Day

by in Holidays, November 23rd, 2011

turkey dinner
Every year, I pull out my giant roasting pan (with fitted rack) and thus begins the annual ritual of cooking a giant turkey for Thanksgiving. What kind of turkey did I make last year? How did I cook it? Though I consider myself a fairly well-seasoned cook, learning how to cook the perfect turkey is something I take care to re-learn every year.

So, where to begin?

A few preliminary questions I always ask:

1. How big does my turkey need to be? I usually estimate about 1 pound of turkey (factoring in the carcass as part of that weight) per person.

2. What kind of turkey? Like a lot of poultry these days, there is quite a variety of turkeys (all raised in different ways, fed different foods) to choose from. You know, this is a difficult question to answer. I don’t think I have ever cooked the same turkey two years in a row. I love Heritage brand the most, but those types of birds are raised in such a way that the meat is leaner and can be slightly tough. I also love a good ol’ supermarket turkey. I say, whatever suits your personal taste.

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