Tag: Trends

Bologna the Beautiful

by in News, August 28th, 2014

Bologna the BeautifulBologna is coming back. Not even ironically. I know this because when I say “bologna sandwich” within earshot of my colleagues*, a lot of feelings come out. And nothing goes better with feelings than garlicky, pink meat circles.

A recent bologna poll I conducted** yielded nearly unanimous “yays and a bunch of exclamation points.” One colleague said “aw,” as if spying an infant hamster sleeping in a sugar bowl. But just because bologna gives us a distant expression and makes us talk in past tense doesn’t mean it’s stuck back there.

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The Jerky Revolution

by in News, Product Reviews, July 29th, 2014

JerkyRemember that beef jerky you got at the gas station during road trips? The stuff that’s loaded with sodium and has what you would imagine the texture of dog treats to be? Well, it has come a long way since then, becoming a bona fide healthy snack for protein lovers. With less sodium, better flavors and almost nothing unnatural about it, artisan jerky is on the rise.

Just one ounce of the leading brand’s beef jerky can have almost 800 milligrams of sodium, while new brands that concentrate on a more-natural process usually stay around 400 milligrams for the same-size serving (some as low as 300). Besides the fact that these new brands won’t make you feel like you’re gnawing on a salt block, they’ve also got an ingredient list you can fully pronounce. It’s refreshing to see words like “garlic” and “sesame seeds” in place of words like “flavorings” and “monosodium glutamate.”

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New “It” Ingredient, Spoiled-Milk Detectors and a $25 Corn Dog

by in News, March 20th, 2014

Spoiled-Milk DetectorsTrend Watch (for Cooks with Deep Pockets): What’s the the newest ‘it’ ingredient among discerning New York City chefs? Ramp seeds (“not the fawned-over leaves or bulbs”), according to Food Arts, which describes them as “tiny, with a pungent punch and an equally sock-it-to-me price tag.” Often preserved using salt or vinegar, the caper-like green seeds have a taste that evokes garlic and onion, and they are being used to add punch to dishes. One chef calls them “tiny flavor bombs.” But even extravagant chefs are sprinkling them sparingly: Labor intensive to harvest, ramp seeds cost about $120 per pound. [Food Arts]

Spare Your Schnoz: To tell if your milk has spoiled, you probably subject it to the sniff test — which really means subjecting yourself to the sniff test, but is still better than skipping directly to the taste test. (Yuck — yet expiration dates are not always reliable freshness indicators.) Now you can spare your senses such unpleasantness. Chinese scientists have come up with “smart tags” — small, gelatinous squares — you can stick on containers that change colors to indicate when the food in them has gone bad. [CBS News]

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Trending: Toast? Yes. Plus: 5 Ways to Embrace Its Simplicity

by in News, February 14th, 2014

ToastWhat says good morning like a thick slice of toast with melty butter tucking into each bit, crumb and bite? Food nerds on Facebook and Twitter a couple weeks back spread around an article about fancy toast in and around San Francisco, making mouths water at breakfast tables ever since. Describing a $3, $4 and higher pricetags per slice at chic diners and restos, the article and a few that followed it prompted the question: Is toast worth it? (For some the pricetags are a headscratcher; others, not so much.) Set aside any debate about whether toast is going artisanal on the West Coast or elsewhere and who started it, though, because the best toast you’ve ever had can be made, of course, right at home.

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What’s Next in Food Trends for 2014

by in News, December 30th, 2013


The editors, cooks and food-curious experts at Food Network Kitchens are always looking for what’s fun, delicious and next. It’s become a given that food fans, chefs and media types of all sorts look ahead and share their expectations. From their glimpse into the 2014 crystal ball, here’s a not-so-serious, definitely unscientific look at the food trends seen as up-and-coming.

“It’s kind of a wild time in food, full of contradictions,” says Katherine Alford, SVP of Culinary at Food Network. “On one hand people are more adventurous than ever. They’re eating Korean and Szechwan, seeking out crazy-hot ghost peppers, and mixing and matching to make outlandish hybrids of comfort foods. But that’s all balanced with a growing demand for food that matters more to our bodies’ well-being and the planet’s well-being, too.” Recently and still coming, you can see an eclectic mix of comfort food and healthy food, plus local picks as well as far-flung favorites. “In the past few years we’ve upped our spices, eaten more veggies and grown to expect some playfulness on the plate,” Alford says. “With all that, next year I’m keeping my eye on what’s cooking right here in America’s heartland. There is real excitement in the fresh voices cooking there. As for 2014, we hope what we found is inspiring with a little wishful thinking mixed in.” Tell us what you’re looking forward to as the next delicious food on your table in the new year.

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Sew Much Food

by in Events, Food Network Magazine, August 21st, 2013

crochet foodWe thought we had seen it all in the fake-food world, but crafters are cranking out something new and totally irresistible: crocheted snacks. Inspired by the popular Japanese art of amigurumi (crocheting small dolls and toys), American knitters have been dreaming up all sorts of fun meals, like this burger, dog and fries ($12/hot dog, $22/burger and fries; etsy.com). You can find free patterns online, or better yet, learn from the pros: This month, three big knitting stores — ImagiKnit in San Francisco (imagiknit.com), Purl Soho in New York City (purlsoho.com) and The Little Knittery in Los Angeles (thelittleknittery.com) — will launch food-design crochet classes.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

Going Bananas: Winter Fancy Food Show Picks Top Food Trends

by in News, January 24th, 2013

BananasThis past weekend in San Francisco, Winter Fancy Food Show attendees discovered more than 80,000 products — from cheeses to teas to olive oils and meats, there’s no shortage of food and beverages to captivate industry insiders, food-lovers, restaurateurs and the media.

The show also predicts upcoming trends for the industry. Last year we saw lots of pickling (which made its way into many restaurants), ancient grains (quinoa and chia), coconut in ice cream, pudding and jam, and gluten-free products that people can rely on.

This year’s top food trends have just been picked by a panel of trendspotters, and bananas will now have their time in the spotlight. Still staying in the sweets bucket, the trendspotters loved the banana within Vosges Haut-Chocolat’s Wild Ophelia Peanut Butter & Banana Milk Chocolate Bar, PB Crave’s CoCo Bananas Peanut Butter and GoodPop’s Banana Cinnamon Frozen Pop.

Bring this trend into your kitchen by trying these recipes

What’s New? Make Some Room for These Food Items in 2013

by in News, January 2nd, 2013

GochujangFood Network Kitchens have come up with their annual list of the top food trends that will define 2013. Last week, Jonathan Milder shared 2013’s Trailblazing Chefs and Blazing-Hot Flavors. Today, he’s listing the 10 items you should have stocked in your pantry and refrigerators for the upcoming year.

1. Artisanal hard cider (the boozy stuff!) is the new craft beer.
2. Sweet potatoes are the new potatoes.
3. Paleo is the new gluten-free (gluten-free is the new low-carb).
4. Roasted seaweed is the new kale chip.
5. Carrots are the new kale.
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Trailblazing Chefs and Blazing-Hot Flavors — 2013 Predictions From Food Network Kitchens

by in News, December 23rd, 2012

Blazing Hot Flavors - 2013 Food Trend PredictionsFood Network Kitchens have come up with their annual list of the top food trends that will define 2013. Check out some of the trends here.

1. Pop “Culture” — Is fermentation poised to be the new yoga? Beer, miso, yogurt, kombucha and their kin will multiply in 2013. Chefs love fermentation because it’s the ultimate source of complex flavors (it’s what makes grapes into a glass of wine), marketers love selling “live active cultures,” health nuts appreciate probiotics, and DIY-ers are learning that it’s easy to get into.

2. Heat Seekers — With jalapenos and chipotles now as common as meat and potatoes, the search for spicy satisfaction will lead us to seek heat in new places. The mass market is getting on board with Doritos taco shells, Sriracha popcorn and Spicy Pizzeria Cracker Jacks, while chefs are exploring warming Aleppo pepper and numbing Sichuan pepper.

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What’s Hot in Desserts: Ice Cream

by in Events, News, October 18th, 2012

ice cream sweet event nycwffWhen you think of desserts, cookies, cakes, cupcakes and brownies usually come to mind first. But at Sandra Lee’s recent Sweet! event at the New York City Wine & Food Festival, the real star of the show was ice cream. Whether it was sandwiched between bites of doughnut, paired with a cupcake or eaten on its own, no two dishes were alike.

Diana Hardeman of MilkMade Ice Cream offered up scrumptious cranberry chocolate chip ice cream. Handcrafted with big hunks of both cranberry and chocolate, this homage to fall wasn’t your average pint.

Taking a more classic approach with an unexpected twist, Le Bernadin’s Chocolate Pink Peppercorn Ice Cream Sandwiches contained just the right kick of spice to bring out the subtle flavor of the chocolate sandwich base.

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