Tag: Tips

Organize Your Cabinets — Spring-Cleaning

by in How-to, March 20th, 2014

Organize Your CabinetsWith the new season just beginning it’s time to start thinking about spring-cleaning, your kitchen included. Getting organized means less time spent searching through your cabinets for key utensils or ingredients. That means less time in the kitchen overall when you need to get dinner on the table on a busy weeknight. From spices to baking tools, Vivian Jao put together her top tips for getting the most out of your space.

1. Your Pantry
Make meal planning easier with a well-organized pantry. Assign designated areas for different kinds of food, like baked goods, breakfast items, boxed goods and canned goods. Label these areas or shelves as a reminder for when you’re unpacking groceries. Designate a section for quick-cooking meals, like mac and cheese or canned soup, for when you just need to grab something in a pinch.

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Pick Your Pot: Top Tips for Nonstick, Cast Iron and Stainless Steel Cookware

by in How-to, February 11th, 2014

Every cookware surface has its own set of rules to guarantee correctly cooking food and a long life on your shelf. Whether your cabinets are stocked with nonstick, cast iron or stainless steel (or you’re thinking about a set to invest in), these tips will keep your pots and pans properly cared for.

1. Nonstick
When cooking with nonstick pans use medium heat or lower. High heat on a coated pan will shorten its shelf life. Because temperatures can soar, don’t preheat an empty pan. Add food or even oil from the start. Keep in mind that foods prepared in a nonstick pan will not brown well, as high heat is necessary for a seared surface to develop. Foods won’t be able to adhere to the surface and form the browned bits that make up a golden crust.

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Skim, Skim, Skim

by in Food Network Magazine, September 4th, 2013

ladleIf you’re making a sauce, soup or stew with meat, a layer of fat will probably appear on the surface. To remove it, position your pot halfway off the burner: The fat will migrate to the cooler side. Then gently lower a ladle onto the surface of the fat (try not to disturb the surface too much or you’ll stir the fat back in). Better yet, if you have time, chill the dish: The fat will congeal and you can scoop it off.

5 Tips for Successful Grilling

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, June 26th, 2012

leah brickleyWe’re hard at work in the test kitchen months before grilling season starts. We often find ourselves developing summertime favorites in the middle of winter, and finding a spot to grill (sometimes in the snow) can be challenging. I’m lucky enough to have a backyard and both a gas and charcoal grill, so I volunteer on occasion to bundle up and test recipes from home to ensure accuracy.

Here are some tips I picked up this past winter while testing recipes for the June issue of Food Network Magazine.

5 Tips for Successful Grilling:

1.    Get organized. Make sure everything you need is organized and within reach of your grilling command station. Using a small baking sheet is a great way to keep sauces, seasonings, timers, thermometers, recipes and miscellaneous equipment nearby and ready.

2.    Invest in a thermometer. If you’re cooking larger, more expensive cuts of meat using a thermometer can help with accurate cooking temperatures — so you don’t overcook that pricey steak. We in the test kitchens like digital instant-read thermometers.

Click here for three more tips

Make a Quick Pickle

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, June 22nd, 2012

Cold Asian Noodles with Pork

Hot tips from Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Homemade pickles are a fun way to customize sandwiches and salads, and they don’t have to take days. You can pickle vegetables by soaking them in a vinegar-based brine for just 20 minutes, like Food Network Magazine did for these Cold Asian Noodles With Pork. Use a hot brine to pickle beets, carrots and other dense vegetables, and a cold brine for more delicate vegetables, like the red onion in these Chicken Salad Sandwiches With Walnut-Dill Pesto.

Rethink Your Pasta

by in Food Network Magazine, June 12th, 2012

Ravioli Salad

Hot tips from Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Instead of the usual penne or macaroni, try stuffed pasta like ravioli, tortellini or pierogi in a pasta salad. Stick to cheese varieties (meat-filled pasta isn’t as appealing cold) and choose a subtle dressing that won’t overpower the filling, like the lemony one in this Ravioli Salad from Food Network Magazine.

Put Your Burner to Work

by in Food Network Magazine, May 29th, 2012

Charred Pepper

Hot tips from Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Try roasting a pepper directly over a gas burner: Rest the pepper right on the burner grate, turn the heat to high and rotate it frequently with tongs until it’s charred (the pepper served with the Spinach and Feta Frittata from Food Network Magazine took just a few minutes). You can use your burner flame to heat tortillas and pita bread, too. If you don’t have a gas stove, just use your broiler.

Bobby Flay’s 7 Holiday Favorites

by in Food Network Chef, Holidays, December 15th, 2011

Bobby Flay
Bobby Flay took a break from cooking for “Savor Borgata: A Taste of American Classics” at Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa in Atlantic City, N.J. to chat with us about his holiday plans. We asked him seven rapid-fire questions to help us get to know his holiday personality.

FN Dish: For a holiday drink, eggnog, apple cider or hot chocolate?
Bobby Flay: Hot chocolate

FN Dish: Vodka, tequila, gin or bourbon?
BF: Bourbon

FN Dish: Christmas breakfast or Christmas dinner?
BF: Breakfast

Does Bobby eat fruitcake? »

Food & Finance – Kids Survival Guide

by in View All Posts, March 26th, 2009

Winter’s gone by the wayside (hopefully) and the great outdoors await – after you finish your grocery shopping. You’ve followed my tips and made a detailed list. You have your coupons and your cash. But you’ve also got a car full of kids with a knack for wreaking havoc on your financial prudence.

Each one wants a different cereal, ice cream, lunch snack and juice box. One is hungry, another tired and yet another needs to go to the bathroom. You just throw everything into the cart in an effort to emerge from the store with your sanity, but you are also vastly over budget, having broken the cardinal rule of sticking to your list.

The stress that frequently accompanies taking children on a trip to the supermarket often results in additional pounds on the hips and fewer dollars in the bank. But this does not have to be the case!

Roni’s tips for grocery shopping with kids