Tag: tea

Cook with Tea

by in Food Network Magazine, January 20th, 2014

Cook With TeaTo add flavor without extra calories, turn to your favorite tea: Steep a bag in water and use that for boiling vegetables, cooking grains or poaching chicken and fish (like in Food Network Magazine‘s Green Tea Salmon). Try all kinds of tea, such as black, mint, chai, chamomile or spice. Just don’t steep the tea bag for too long; the flavor can become bitter.

Beyond the Teacup: 9 Recipes Made With Tea

by in Recipes, March 6th, 2013

Tea-Smoked ChickenIf you’re a big tea drinker, you probably go through cups and cups of the cozy hot beverage on a daily basis. It’s a great way to relax and recharge, to soothe the throat or maybe it’s just a habit. But have you ever taken a moment to think about what uses tea may have in cooking? It’s a given that teas are flavorful — black teas are strong, green teas are light and then there are so many more types in between. Take some tea — maybe even your favorite kind — and incorporate it into a recipe. You’re bound to get flavorful results, not to mention a very creative meal.

There are actually many uses for teas in recipes: brining, poaching, braising and even baking are some methods that benefit from its use. And the best part is, these recipes don’t make you go out of your way to use the tea — in most cases it’s just swapping in brewed tea for the liquid that you would normally have used, like the water or stock in a braise, for example. If you’re willing to give cooking with tea a try, here are some of Food Network’s best recipes.

Get the recipes using tea

10 Interesting Facts About Tea — Iron Chef America Ingredients 101

by in Drinks, Shows, January 21st, 2013

Iron Chef America Battle TeaAs a very proud Englishman, I know that it is tea rather than blood that flows through my veins and that it’s a very rare day indeed when I don’t pop the kettle on the stove for a nice strong “cuppa” to fortify me through a long day of work.

Although I was disappointed not to be asked to judge this particular battle in Kitchen Stadium, I was just as keen as everyone else to see what magic Iron Chef Forgione and his challenger, Chef Kittichai could come up with to give inspiration on new ways to use one of my own kitchen essentials.

Here are 10 interesting facts that you might not know about tea:

1. The word tea comes from the Chinese T’e, which was the word in the Amoy dialect for the plant from which tea leaves came. In Mandarin, the word was ch’a, which is where the words char and chai are derived from.

Keep reading

Three Ways to Use: Black Tea

by in Food Network Magazine, May 16th, 2012

earl grey cupcakes
Each month, Food Network Magazine puts chefs from Food Network Kitchens to the test: Create recipes that put a new spin on a pantry staple like chocolate syrup or instant coffee.

This month, Morgan Hass, Sarah Copeland and Rob Bleifer infuse cupcakes, cocktails and even ribs with subtle notes of black tea.

Recipe: Tea Cakes With Earl Grey Icing (pictured above)
Sarah says: “These tiny, rich chocolate cakes come alive with a playful puff of Earl Grey meringue.”

Read more

It’s National Iced Tea Month

by in Holidays, June 1st, 2011

iced tea
June is National Iced Tea Month — so get out your tall glasses and ice cubes and celebrate the warm weather by pouring yourself a home-brewed glass of iced tea.

According to Food Network’s Encyclopedia, “Tea grew wild in China until the Chinese determined the leaves helped flavor the flat taste of the water that they boiled to prevent getting sick. All tea plants belong to the same species, but varying climates, soils, etc., combine in different ways to create a plethora of distinctive leaves.”

Whether enjoyed plain, sweetened, flavored or spiked, sip down this cool drink with one of these recipes:

Giada’s Sweet Apple Iced Tea
Thai Iced Tea
Ellie’s Lemon-Ginger Iced Tea With Berry Cubes
Iced Tea With Grenadine

Browse our picks for alcoholic versions after the jump »

FIRST AIDa — On Set

by in View All Posts, November 20th, 2008

Healing tea

If you’ve ever tried to talk to camera while wielding a large chef’s knife, you’d know that it’s easy to mistake your finger for a piece of produce. You might also know that thumb wounds seem to bleed disproportionately to the severity of the cut. At least we found that out on set at Ask Aida, Season 2.

It was Shoot Day One and all was going as smoothly as ever, until poor Aida missed the preserved lemon and got her thumb instead. Ever the trooper, she wanted to patch and get back into action, but her thumb was not cooperating. I immediately thought of liquid bandage, but it turns out that stuff doesn’t work well on cuts that are still bleeding. The first aid kit had clotting spray, but that failed as well.

Producer Matt applied pressure, but all that did was make it hurt even worse. It wasn’t until a crew member suggested a wet tea bag that we found our solution. Who knew? Apparently the tannic acid in tea is a natural coagulant. It’s a common remedy after getting wisdom teeth pulled or for problematic cuts on pets. For all that we know about food, our ‘food as first aid knowledge is pretty light! Learn something new every day — particularly on set.

– FN Fay, Program Manager