Tag: steak

How to Perfectly Grill Your Favorite Cut of Steak

by in Recipes, August 9th, 2016

Skirt SteakThere’s nothing worse than buying yourself a nice steak for dinner, and then ruining the meat with a grilling misstep. Even though they make for a hearty meal, steaks require a little finesse to cook perfectly. To grill your favorite cut just right, take the advice of a few Food Network stars.

Skirt Steak
High heat helps this long, flat cut achieve a flavorful sear, but be careful not to overcook it; the meat can quickly become tough and chewy. Marcela Valladolid marinates the skirt steak in this recipe in citrus and beer to tenderize it.

Try It: Beer-Marinated Grilled Skirt Steak (above)

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3 of a Kind: Baseball Steak

by in Restaurants, June 15th, 2016

Baseball Steak3 of a Kind checks out three places across the country to try something cool, new and delicious.

As steakhouses regain popularity, cuts of meat beyond the New York strip and filet mignon are making their way onto menus. One of these cuts — the baseball steak — is made from the upper portion of a top sirloin. Once it’s cooked, you can clearly see what inspired this steak’s moniker, as the meat puffs up to resemble a baseball. This leaner cut has a rich flavor and is often less expensive than its counterparts, making it a home run for restaurants across the country.

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Move Over, Chicken — It’s Steak Time: 12 Best Recipes

by in Recipes, June 24th, 2015

Move Over, Chicken — It's Steak Time: 12 Best Recipes Though chicken might rule the weeknight dinner menu, there’s no reason why steak can’t step up to the plate. Just like its poultry counterpart, steak is the perfect blank canvas for decadent sauces, zesty salsas and crisp beds of lettuce. In the following recipes, your favorite chefs have you covered, from weeknight-friendly steak dinners to open-faced steak sandwiches and tacos. Keep browsing below for more steak recipes that will keep you going (and grilling) all summer long, then check out a step-by-step grilling guide to cooking the best beef.

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Swoon Over Steak Dinner: 4 Meaty Meals to Make on Valentine’s Day

by in Holidays, Recipes, February 7th, 2015

Steak PizzaiolaValentine’s Day may be all about hearts, roses and chocolate, but when it comes to indulging in a fancy dinner on Feb. 14, look to a juicy, meaty steak to treat your sweetie. On this morning’s all-new episode of The Kitchen, Katie Lee prepared the ultimate in beefy decadence: filet mignon. She opted for a filet cut of beef to guarantee soft, buttery meat, then she doctored up the dish with sides of golden-brown potatoes and simple asparagus studded with pine nuts. Read on below to find three other ways to serve a simple yet stunning steak supper for your valentine.

For a lighter alternative to the classic steak dinner, try Food Network Magazine’s Steak Pizzaiola (pictured above), ready to eat in only 35 minutes. This healthy recipe boasts seared sirloin steak simmered in a bold tomato sauce with bell peppers and onions, plus a pinch of red pepper flakes to offer welcome spice.

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Alton Cooks the Superstar Sabotage Tournament: Steak

by in Recipes, Shows, October 23rd, 2014

At its most basic, a surf and turf dish includes one seafood and one land-based element, so on this week’s Cutthroat Kitchen: Superstar Sabotage tournament Heat 3 battle, host Alton Brown stretched that definition to include inferior versions of those components when he auctioned off ingredient swaps that included canned tuna for surf and liver for turf. For fans watching at home, surf and turf most likely connotes a dinner of lobster and steak, and likely an elegant one at that, but when it comes to steak, it doesn’t have to be saved for a special occasion.

If you don’t often make steak at home, try Alton’s simplest-ever recipe as a go-to starting place. His Pan-Seared Rib Eye (pictured above) boasts more than 500 user reviews and a glowing 5-star rating. Best of all, since his foolproof technique suggests making the steak on the stove, there’s no grilling required, which means you can enjoy meaty flavors year-round.

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Steakhouse Rib Eyes with Creamed Spinach — Down-Home Comfort

by in Recipes, Restaurants, September 26th, 2014

It’s a rite of passage to go to one of America’s great steakhouses. Dark knotty, wide wood; warm, well-polished brass; and banquettes upholstered in worn, creased leather set the stage. When partnered with excellent food and excellent service, it’s an all-American experience. Our attraction to the scent of meat cooking on fire is basic; the wafting smoke seems to awaken some sort of primordial urge buried deep in the recesses of our carnivorous brains. There’s not much heartier and more satisfying in terms of comfort food than a meaty, perfectly charred steak topped with mushrooms and served with a baked potato and creamed spinach. This is how the West was won — or at least west Wall Street.

Life occasionally calls for a thick, juicy steak. Those special times might be celebrating something such as a big promotion, a graduation or an anniversary. The celebrations often come with a big price tag, too. Down-home comfort steakhouse-style is a real cause for celebration, because you can do it in the comfort of your own home. No rude waiters, no dings in the car due to the careless teenager in valet and no eye-popping bill that costs as much as a house payment.

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A 5-Minute Steak Defrost Hack? (and Other Meat-Thawing Tips)

by in News, July 24th, 2014

Grilled SteakIt’s the end of a long day and you’re craving a thick, juicy steak. Fortunately, you have a nice fresh cut in the freezer, awaiting its big moment. Unfortunately it’s frozen solid as a rock and dinnertime is in less than an hour. Time to surrender your steak dreams and start making pasta instead? Nope, not so fast.

CTi, a Taiwanese cable channel, suggests an electricity-free steak-defrosting hack that will safely thaw a frozen steak about 1 centimeter thick in less than five minutes. How? Take two metal pots or pans, turn one over bottom up and place your vacuum-sealed steak flat on it. Then fill the other pot or pan with water and place it, topside up, on top of the steak. The weight of the water and its temperature, conducted by the metal, will speed thawing. In five minutes, CTi says, your steak should be defrosted and ready to cook. (You can use the time to pick a recipe.)

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Steak Myths: 3 Rules Not to Follow

by in How-to, July 23rd, 2014

Steak is not like other foods; it is sufficient in itself, or very nearly so. Add salt and heat (fire preferably), and you have something no culinary sleight of hand can improve on. Does a steak need a recipe? Heck no. But recipes abound, and with them come all manner of tips, tricks and techniques, most of which diminish your likelihood of cooking a great steak. Read more

Alton’s Top 5 Tactics to Make Steak

by in Food Network Chef, Recipes, June 9th, 2014

Alton loves his steak, and with summer looming, now is the perfect time to get out that barbecue and start grilling. As Alton mentions in his latest YouTube video, his favorite type of steak to grill is the skirt steak. Heated directly on coals, this succulent meat needs no marinade except for some salt.

Alton also experiments in the kitchen, however, with a number of ways to eat steak. Here are five more:

1. He creates a spicy marinade with pepper flakes and Mexican brown sugar in this Skirt Steak recipe.Skirt Steak

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The Secret to Grilling the Perfect Steak (Indoors and Out)

by in How-to, News, May 14th, 2014

The Secret to Grilling the Perfect SteakLet’s talk steak. Just the thought of a thick, juicy slab of perfectly cooked beef will make the mouths of enthusiastic carnivores water. (Those who don’t eat meat may want to just move along to the next post.)

New York Times dining reporter Julia Moskin fills in her readers on her tried-and-true method for cooking steak on the stovetop: Forget the talk about dry rubs and marinating, she advises. Buy your meat from a butcher. Choose thinner, boneless cuts — marbled, about 1 inch thick. Keep the meat refrigerated until about a half-hour before you’re ready to cook, then pat it dry with paper towels. Use a cast-iron skillet (unoiled) and turn the heat up “insanely” high. Salt the pan (not the steak) and heat it some more. Lay down your meat, wait about a minute, then flip it every 30 seconds until – 4 or 5 minutes later – you have a perfectly cooked steak. It’ll be crusty on the outside, pink on the inside.

“If it’s good quality steak and you don’t cook it for more than five minutes per inch, you really can’t mess it up,” Richard Schatz of New York City’s Schatzie the Butcher reassures Julia’s readers. “Steak is nothing to be scared of.”

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