Tag: snacks

6 DIY Versions of Store-Bought Snacks

by in Family, June 16th, 2014

6 DIY Versions of Store-Bought SnacksHaving kids means having snacks on hand. Try these can’t-miss recipes for homemade versions of supermarket favorites like granola bars, graham crackers, cereal bars and cheddar cheese crackers. They’re fresher, tastier and easier to make than you think.

Homemade Granola Bars: Ina Garten packs her bars with almonds, dates, dried cranberries and even a pinch of wheat germ in this recipe.

DIY Strawberry Cereal Bars: Give that box of popular cereal bars a run for its money with this simple recipe full of whole oats and a secret ingredient no kid can resist: a thick layer of organic strawberry fruit spread.

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Inside The Kitchen’s Snackadium, Plus Game-Day Snack Recipes

by in Recipes, Shows, January 25th, 2014

The Kitchen Co-HostsJust in time for next week’s big game, the co-hosts on The Kitchen — along with Rob Del Balzo, a caterer — created a super snack platter worthy of not just any tailgate but the ultimate football showdown. This “snackadium,” modeled after a traditional football stadium, was almost overflowing with classic and creative munchies alike, including fresh vegetables, crackers and pretzels, plus pigs in blankets and Jeff’s meaty mortadella sandwiches.

More photos and snack recipes

Vacuum-Fried Snacks — The Next Best Thing You Never Ate

by in News, January 15th, 2013

Vacuum-Fried Snacksby Vince Camillo

What’s the next best thing you never ate?

The staff of Food Network Kitchens might know. We see (taste and smell) ingredients and products just before they make themselves known to the national palate. Sometimes one of our on-air chefs brings them into our kitchen, sometimes we find them during restaurant dinners or in grocery stores, at home and away. Each month we’re going to share one with you, along with tips or recipes. And we know that many of you devote a good amount of time to exploring, tasting or simply getting dinner on the table, so let us know what you find that might just be the next best thing we never ate.

If you’ve ever eaten a vacuum-fried banana chip (or any vacuum-fried fruit or vegetable), you may have been staring into the bag of the next big thing. Though the bag you remember was likely empty, because once you eat one of these puffed little disks of pure banana essence, you’ll realize that you can’t stop — the most important indicator of a successful snack.

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White House Snack Attack

by in Family, Food Network Magazine, August 21st, 2012

chocolate drizzled pretzelsSam Kass, a White House chef and Michelle Obama’s adviser for her Let’s Move! program, says that the White House is always stocked with fruit in case Sasha or Malia needs a bite. But Sam knows that kids don’t always come home from school begging fora healthy snack, so he offered up these smart swaps for some favorite after-school treats.

Instead of a candy bar, drizzle chocolate on pretzels or apples (pictured left).

Chop 1/2 pound dark chocolate. Microwave three quarters of the chocolate in 30-second intervals, stirring, until mostly melted. Stir in the remaining chocolate until smooth. Drizzle over mini pretzels or apple slices and let harden.

“There is no substitution for chocolate!” Sam says. “The key is moderation.”

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Fun With Fondue

by in Recipes, October 28th, 2011

Who says you can’t play with your food? Fondue is a warm bath of melted cheese, chocolate or blended fruit puree just waiting for you to dunk something into it. Best served with cubes of bread or freshly chopped fruits or vegetables, fondue can be made in a classic fondue warming pot or on the stove and later plated. Our savory and sweet fondue recipes below are quick-to-prepare snacks or light meals, so grab a fondue fork and start dipping.

Food Network Magazine’s traditional Fondue (pictured above) is made with gooey-good Gruyere cheese, crisp white wine and a healthy splash of cognac. Serve along with slices of tart green apples to balance the richly flavored cheese.

More fondue recipes »

Snack Pockets From Food Network Kitchens

by in Behind the Scenes, Food Network Magazine, October 10th, 2011

croque pockets
Microwaveable snack pockets are one of those foods people love to hate on. They’re often thought of as a last-resort after school snack or a guilt-laden solution to the midnight munchies. The comedian Jim Gaffigan even has a pretty hilarious skit about them (watch it here).  But the truth is a lot of people secretly love them. It’s not hard to understand why. I mean, they’re hearty, easy to eat and convenient.

Here in the Food Network Kitchens, we wanted to capitalize on all the great things about snack pockets and fix all the bad things — like the processed, overly salty, not-so-good for you fillings and often soggy crust.

Find your favorite filling »

Fruit Leather Roll-Ups — Food Network Kitchens

by in Behind the Scenes, September 29th, 2011

fruit leather roll-ups
For recent story on old-school fruit leather roll-ups in Food Network Magazine’s September issue, chefs in Food Network Kitchens tried all sorts of combos, but apple-ginger, spicy mango and raspberry-vanilla were clear favorites. Don’t ask for pineapple, “No matter how many times recipe developers tried it, it just wouldn’t set.”

Get the recipes and check out behind-the-scenes photos »

Your Favorite Childhood Snacks

by in Community, September 5th, 2011

peanut butter on spoon
More than 1,500 Food Network Facebook fans responded when we asked: “If you could go back in time, what childhood snack would you eat?” The answers were all over the map, with lots of comments for Mom’s (and Grandma’s) home cooking, but a few nostalgia-inducing picks came out on top.

The overwhelming choice: anything with peanut butter. Nothing screams childhood more than ants on a log, a combination of celery, peanut butter and raisins. Another popular favorite, peanut butter and marshmallow fluff sandwiches. Whether you called them “fluffernutters” or something entirely different, they still hold a place dear to your hearts.

MoonPies came in a close second, with Twinkies and Jell-O Pudding Pops holding a close third. Sugary treats like S’mores, Dunkaroos and Hostess Chocodiles (Twinkies covered in chocolate) were often listed, as well.

A surprise snack that many Southern fans can’t get enough of is a cold Coca-Cola in a glass bottle with salted peanuts inside. Fried bologna sandwiches and homemade Rice Krispies also make you melt, but not as much as a pure peanut butter and sugar rush.

What are your favorite childhood snacks?