Tag: roasting

An Ode to the Oven — Sensational Sides

by in Family, Recipes, April 3rd, 2013

Roasted Fennel With TomatoesThink about it — your oven has done a lot for you this season. It’s seen pies and casseroles, pot roasts and big birds. It’s gotten you through holidays and frosty nights. Let’s not even mention all the cookies and cakes. But soon enough, you’ll be trading your boots for shorts and your oven for the grill. It’s just how the cycle goes.

This week, as you get your hands on some of that fresh spring produce, keep that faithful oven of yours in mind. It roasts veggie after veggie to sheer perfection, making certain your sides are simply sensational.

When asparagus meets the oven, it doesn’t need much else. Food Network Magazine’s pristine Roasted Asparagus calls upon nothing more than toasted pine nuts and lemon to accentuate its earthy flavors. Ina Garten’s Parmesan Roasted Asparagus, on the other hand, is luxurious and the perfect mate to a sumptuous steak.

Though Roasted Carrots may scream fall, this recipe by Food Network Magazine uses lemon, red onion, cilantro and spices to inject a seasonal flair. Add a dose of green for Roasted Carrots and Peas, ensuring that the vibrancy of the season shines through. Here’s a good tip: It’s a good idea to parboil hard veggies like carrots so the finished product comes down without a crunch.

Get more roasted side dish recipes from friends and family

Emily’s Goose is Cooked

by in View All Posts, January 8th, 2009

Goose, cookedThough known as kitchen adventurer, I even surprised my family when I announced a menu inspired by the Dickens’s classic, A Christmas Carol. Yes… the Cratchits enjoying a humble yet festive Christmas Eve dinner, with a goose at the center. I wanted a challenge.

With a roasted goose as the key, I immediately flocked to Emeril’s recipe for Roast Port Glazed Goose with Tawny Port Gravy because of the stellar reviews.

As I’m entrenched in the Food Network Store, the right equipment is a must, and I made sure I had sufficient roasting pan. With any type of poultry — chicken, turkey, duck, or goose- a rack is critical. The bird is elevated; allowing heat to circulate fully. Without it, your goose will be cooked — and not in a good way. Some of my faves are here.

Another vital tool is the bulb baster. Basting with pan drippings while it cooks will help to keep the meat moist. Once an internal temp of 180F is reached, your goose is good to go. Need a temperature check? These are solid choices.

I finished with a port glaze, followed by a brief broil to crisp up the skin. As the skin quite brown in areas, I worried about overcooking, but it was actually great, if I do say so myself. It was more delicate than duck and more richly flavored than turkey, which I find bland at times.

I accompanied with goose fat-roasted potatoes, tawny port gravy and a side of steamed green beans. For Dickensian desserts, I made mincemeat pie and hot wassail, and my mom made my great-grandmother’s Christmas pudding with traditional hard sauce.

Despite potential for disaster, it ended up as a great experience for my family to share a special meal. Goose sounds daunting, but recommend the experience for any great dinner. Though inspired by a holiday story, this special gathering with family and friends could be enjoyed all year long.

EmilyFood Network Store guru and kitchen equipment geek