Tag: restaurants

In Search of the Healthiest Dish on the Menu? Help Is On the Way.

by , August 25th, 2014

chalkboard menu

You’re feeling hungry and hankering for some comfort food, so you slip into your local diner and scan the menu, looking for healthy options. You know they’re in there, hidden among the burgers and fries, shakes and floats, waffles and three-egg omelets loaded with cheese. A spinach salad? A fresh fruit plate? A low-cal veggie soup, not too heavy on the sodium? The trick is to find them.

Health-aware food marketing experts want to help, basically by using the things restaurants do to manipulate diners into ordering high-profit menu items for the greater good — or at least to boost our collective good health. In a study recently published in the International Journal of Hospitality Management, Cornell University professor Brian Wansink (the man credited with the 100-calorie snack pack) and co-author Katie Love found that people eating in restaurants tend to order descriptively named menu items more frequently than those with bland names. Renaming “seafood fillet” something like “Succulent Italian Seafood Fillet,” for example, boosted sales 28 percent.

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On the Road: Summer Travel Must-Eats

by in Restaurants, August 12th, 2014

Summer Travel Must-EatsBy Joanna Gryfe

Craving a delicious summer vacation? No need to break the bank or hop any borders; we’ve scoured the States for the top domestic destinations with specialty dishes worth traveling for. Check out these must-eat spots to sample local recipes that Food Network chefs praise as being The Best Thing I Ever Ate.

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Take a Fried Chicken Road Trip

by in Restaurants, August 7th, 2014

Take a Fried Chicken Road Trip Fried chicken is tempting all year long, but our cravings for it intensify in the summer. Something about digging into juicy, crispy chicken with our hands, preferably while sipping a cold beer or lemonade, just puts us in a summer state of mind. You don’t need to be outside on a picnic blanket eating Grandma’s homemade chicken to achieve this. Once a Southern specialty, fried chicken has made its way onto restaurant menus across the country. Chefs from Philly to San Francisco are brining, buttermilk-soaking, boldly spicing and frying it up, with winning results. Here’s where you’ll find FoodNetwork.com editors’ favorites. Whether they’re served with cream gravy and collards or Sriracha and kimchi, these birds all have one thing in common: They’re downright irresistible.

Check out the full gallery and let us know your favorite spots for a fried chicken fix in the comments below!

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Your Restaurant Guide to the Hamptons

by in Restaurants, August 2nd, 2014

Your Restaurant Guide to the HamptonsWelcome to the Hamptons: home to beautiful beaches, incredible real estate and renowned traffic (especially during prime summer season). In the many villages and hamlets of the towns of Southampton and East Hampton, restaurants can cycle through as quickly as summer tourists. But an abundance of local produce and access to both the Long Island Sound and the Atlantic Ocean for fresh seafood mean you’re guaranteed to get a great meal at any time of the year. Plentiful weekly farmers markets, along with roadside stands like Little Dog Farm (pictured above), The Green Thumb farm stand (one of Katie Lee’s favorites, where she buys local Mecox cheese) and North Sea Farms, mean you can also make a mean meal at home. To help craft this tour we reached out to a few experts, including Food Network stars Katie Lee and Geoffrey Zakarian; Dan Rattiner, the publisher of the local iconic weekly Dan’s Papers and host of Dan’s Taste of Summer (where you can try almost all of these spots in one place); and Kathleen King, founder and owner of Tate’s Bake Shop. And we added a few of our personal favorites.

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How Much Would You Pay for That Dinner Reservation?

by in News, June 25th, 2014

How Much Would You Pay for That Dinner Reservation?It would probably be an overstatement to call the usual way of reserving a table at a hot restaurant at a prime time on a Saturday night an entirely democratic process. In theory, snagging a seat is simply a matter of dialing up the restaurant or booking online through a free website like OpenTable — equally accessible to all. In fact, it probably doesn’t hurt to know someone or be someone or, if conventional wisdom holds, be the kind of person who’s willing to slip a little cash someone’s way.

Now a new batch of fee-based apps is aiming to change the way tables at desirable restaurants are reserved. Whether these new apps, which claim to make hard-to-get reservations available to anyone willing to open their wallets, make the process more democratic is open to debate. Certainly they’ll make it more expensive.

Whether restaurants and diners will embrace the idea of paying for something that has always been free, if sometimes inaccessible, remains to be seen. In New York City, the market most of these new apps initially aims to serve, people are already used to paying a fee to book tickets to events — even to movies.

“But for restaurateurs — even those who demand $6 for a baked potato to accompany a $48 steak — charging patrons for reservations feels like touching the third rail,” Julia Moskin noted in a recent New York Times story about the new apps.

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10 Best Restaurants to Follow on Instagram

by in View All Posts, June 23rd, 2014

While the joke of photographing food has come and gone, what remains is beautifully lit pictures of truly delicious dishes. And if the hipsters started the trend, the restaurants are doing it even better. Which makes sense, because who better to capture the essence of your favorite menu items than the team responsible for creating it? Even better, restaurant Instagram feeds provide amazing behind-the-scenes snaps of how your favorite food gets made. Here are 10 restaurants (well, eight, plus fantastic ice cream and coffee shops) that really up the food-photo game: Read more

Muffulettas to BBQ Shrimp: My New Orleans

by in View All Posts, March 4th, 2014

Muffulettas to BBQ Shimp: My New Orleansby Todd Coleman

I made my first trip to New Orleans in the late ’80s and remember one thing vividly: the muffuletta sandwich. Salty, sweet and tangy between two pieces of bread, it was delicious, perfect. Little did I know how important it was to become to me.

I grew up as an Air Force brat, moving all around, all the time, and had just moved from Germany to Florida with my family in 1986. It was a shock, to everyone. Quickly, instinctively, my dad took us on a trip to New Orleans. The relief set in immediately. I reveled in the old buildings, the Stephen King novel I was reading, the endless cultural thingamajigs and the food. I read about the muffuletta in my dad’s guidebook and begged to go the Central Grocery — the sandwich’s creator.

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On the Road: Best Holiday Dishes

by in Holidays, Restaurants, December 21st, 2013

On the Road: Best Holiday DishesWith family and friends spread far across the country, you’re likely to spend a lot of time on the road visiting this month. While en route, embrace the busy travel season with these Food Network-approved restaurant dishes that will guarantee you a happy holiday road trip. We’ve rounded up the top festive spots to find eggnog, gingerbread and yule logs galore, stretching all the way from the East Coast to snowy Alaska. Here are a few highlights to get your merry eating season started.

Ronnybrook Farm — Ancramdale, N.Y.
Sugarplums may be the traditional dancing vision this time of year, but Alex Guarnaschelli always dreams of rich eggnog instead. Her favorite kind hails from Ronnybrook, where the creamy classic is made with whole milk and heavy cream, and it’s spiced with cinnamon and nutmeg. Alex suggests adding a splash of bourbon to Ronnybrook’s glass bottle of ‘nog for an extra-cozy holiday sip.

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One-on-One with Marc Murphy: Inside His New Restaurant, Kingside

by in Food Network Chef, November 16th, 2013

Marc Murphy's KingsideWhile so many restaurateurs struggle to launch and maintain businesses in New York City, Chef Marc Murphy appears to have found the secret to success. When this Chopped judge isn’t joining his fellow panel members at the table in reviewing contestants’ best attempts at basket dishes, he’s busy running restaurant kitchens at his five Manhattan restaurants: two locations each of Ditch Plains and Landmarc, plus his newest venture, Kingside. Having opened just last month, Marc’s Kingside is the first of his restaurants to reside in a hotel, and it is his only “new-American” menu, featuring a list of offerings with French, Spanish and Italian influences. FN Dish caught up with Marc at Kingside, located in midtown Manhattan’s Viceroy Hotel, to chat about his latest project, learn more about his goals in opening the restaurant and find out how he manages his busy schedules, both in the kitchen and on Chopped. Read on below to hear from Marc, then browse exclusive snapshots to take a photo tour of Kingside and see some of Marc’s most-popular dishes at Kingside.

What are you most excited about in opening Kingside?
Marc Murphy: I haven’t done a new concept in about five years, and in those five years, I think I’ve gotten a lot more popularity on Chopped, and I think a lot of the times people are like, “Oh, those chefs on TV kind of thing,” and I’m like, “Well, yeah, I’m still a working chef,” and I love doing what I do, and I’m excited to be able to produce new food and [a] new concept to my beautiful city.

How is Kingside different from your other restaurants, Ditch Plains and Landmarc?
MM: I guess I’ve opened myself up to be able to do different cuisines here, in the sense we’re calling it “new American,” where I can really sort of branch out and pull different influences from other countries, like Spain. You sort of let loose a bit with new-American cuisine, I feel. I can have a little more liberties, because Ditch Plains is really a New York-style fish shack, so I kind of have to stay within that vocabulary, and Landmarc is a bistro with some Italian influences, so you can’t start making sushi if you’re doing a bistro. I feel as though if somebody is going to come to your restaurant, you have to sort of keep true to what the concept is.

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On the Road: Best Thanksgiving Pies

by in Holidays, Restaurants, November 11th, 2013

Best Thanksgiving Pies on the RoadThe Thanksgiving feast just isn’t complete without an irresistible piece of pie at the end. Something about the buttery crust and rich filling brings comfort and nostalgia to the table, and we’ve rounded up plenty of restaurants and bakeries that dish out just-like-mama-made pecan, pumpkin and apple pies. There are also outside-the-crust options (could you turn down a Fat Elvis Pie?), so check out our full coast-to-coast pie guide and grab a slice — or two! Here are a few highlights to warm up your sweet-seeking taste buds.

Four and Twenty Blackbirds — Brooklyn
Nothing’s more American than apple pie, but this bakery manages to improve on the classic with a mouthwatering salted caramel version. Inspired by caramel apples, this salty-sweet slice is a “taste bud waker-upper” and was praised by Bobby Flay as “what apple pie would look like if your grandma had game.”

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