Tag: how to

Just the Facts: Melting

by in Food Network Magazine, March 28th, 2013

Melting Guide

Stretchy Melters
Instead of oozing, these get stringy and elastic when melted — good for when you want the cheese to stay put, like on pizza.
Stretchy Cheese Melters

Find out which cheeses are creamy and are non-melters

How to Make Fried Mac and Cheese

by in Food Network Magazine, March 23rd, 2013

Food Network Magazine March Cover

Once you’ve made your favorite mac and cheese from Food Network Magazine’s 50 Twists on Mac and Cheese (page 118, March issue), try this tasty trick for using up leftovers:

Fried Mac and Cheese
Shape the cold mac and cheese into meatball-sized balls and place them onto a waxed paper-lined tray. Freeze the balls 2 hours or overnight. Beat 2 eggs and 2 tablespoons water together to form an egg wash, and pour it into a shallow bowl. Combine panko and herbs in another shallow bowl. Remove the mac-and-cheese balls from the freezer. Dip the frozen balls into the egg wash, then into the breadcrumbs. Put the balls back into the freezer until you are ready to fry, or heat 2 inches of oil in a heavy-duty pot to 350 degrees F. Fry the mac-and-cheese balls until they are golden brown and center is hot, about 5 minutes.

Crispy Business: How to Make Parmesan Crisps

by in Food Network Magazine, March 3rd, 2013

Parmesan crisps

Parmesan crisps (frico in Italian) look fancy, but they’re actually just cheese and crackers for the lazy. You get the crunch of a cracker plus big cheese flavor in one — and they’re super easy to make. Toss 1 1/2 cups freshly grated Parmesan with 1 tablespoon flour, then flavor with 1 to 2 teaspoons minced herbs, spices and/or citrus zest. Form the cheese mixture into 12 mounds (2 tablespoons each) and place them on a baking sheet lined with parchment and coated with cooking spray; then flatten into 4-inch rounds. Bake at 375 degrees F until golden, 8 to 10 minutes. While hot, gently remove them from the sheet with a thin spatula and let cool completely.

Clockwise from top left: Lemon zest, Pepper, Curry-coriander, Smoked paprika and Scallion

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

Improve Your Tofu

by in Food Network Magazine, February 21st, 2013

tofu

Hot Tips for Healthy Cooking From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Don’t overlook tofu because you think it’s bland. If you marinate it before cooking, it will turn out super flavorful. Slice firm tofu and drizzle it with your favorite marinade (try the orange juice-onion mixture in Food Network Magazine‘s Tofu Cuban Sandwiches With Jicama Sticks); soak for at least 5 minutes, then sear or bake.

(Photograph by Christopher Testani)

All About Spices: When to Toss, When to Keep and How To Maximize Flavor

by in How-to, January 4th, 2013

bottled spicesIf you’re wondering why your chili doesn’t taste as good as you remember, it might be the chili powder that’s off. You might not have realized it, but spices can actually lose their freshness and flavor over time. That’s why it’s a good idea to check them periodically to see if they’re still any good. What better time to do so than New Year’s? You might as well check it off your to-do list right after you change the batteries in your smoke detectors.

Spices are some of the most important ingredients when it comes to flavoring food. Just imagine an apple pie without cinnamon or an Indian curry without curry powder. Those recipes wouldn’t be the same without those spices. It’s easy to take spices for granted when you use them so often, but they need some attention, especially when it comes to storing them.

Ground vs. whole spices

Peel Garlic in a Flash

by in Food Network Magazine, November 20th, 2012

garlic

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Smashing whole garlic cloves is the best way to peel them: Place the cloves on a cutting board, hold the flat side of a chef’s knife on top and give it a firm whack with the heel of your other hand. Use just enough force to split the skin and crack open the cloves; if you pulverize the garlic with a heavy-handed thud, it will be harder to peel.

(Photograph by Lara Robby/Studio D)

Pan-Fried Sweet Plantains

by in Food Network Magazine, November 10th, 2012

Sweet Plantains with Cilantro Rice
In the Mexican Fish Supper weekend dinner from Food Network Magazine’s October issue (page 132), I created a recipe for a quick Cilantro Rice with Sweet Plantains (pictured above). To make things even easier, I call for frozen fried sweet plantains. They aren’t quite as good as homemade, but they’re pretty good and very easy to prepare.

If you have a little more time and a few plantains on hand, make your own. Make sure your plantains are extremely ripe — even bordering on mushy. If they’re not, the results will not be as yummy or gooey as you really want them to be because the natural sugars inside the plantain haven’t fully developed.

Keep reading for the recipe

How to Bake a Better Potato

by in Food Network Magazine, November 6th, 2012

steak and blue cheese potatoes

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

To improve your baked potatoes inside and out, brush the skin with olive oil or melted butter before baking; it’ll crisp the skin. And don’t wrap potatoes in foil — just prick them all over with a fork (to help steam escape) and bake at 375 degrees F until tender, about 50 minutes. To speed up the cooking process, start the potatoes in the microwave for 12 minutes, then brush with oil and finish in the oven for 10 minutes, like we did for the Steak With Blue Cheese Potatoes recipe pictured above.

(Photograph by Christopher Testani)

Flavor Your Mayo

by in Food Network Magazine, October 23rd, 2012

Tuna Tostadas

Hot tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Add a twist to sandwiches or tacos with custom mayonnaise: Mix plain mayo with citrus zest or juice, fresh herbs, chopped olives or a condiment like pesto or Sriracha. (We made chile-lime mayo for the tuna tostadas pictured above.) Keep the leftovers in the fridge, covered, for up to three days, but taste before reusing: The flavors can intensify after a day or two, so you may need to mellow it out with more mayo.

(Photograph by Christopher Testani)

How to Make Basil Salt

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, August 15th, 2012

Basil Salt

If you need to use up all of that basil from the garden, make basil-flavored salt: Pulse ½ cup kosher salt and ½ cup packed basil leaves in a food processor, then spread on a baking sheet and bake at 225 degrees F until dry, 30 to 40 minutes, tossing halfway through. Let cool and pulse again to make a fine powder. Serve it with fresh tomatoes and mozzarella at a cookout, or package it to give to the neighbors.

(Photograph by Sam Kaplan)