Tag: hot tips

Go for Lower-Fat Cheese, Sometimes

by in Food Network Magazine, March 17th, 2013

Mozzarella Cheese

Hot Tips for Cooking With Cheese From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Lower-fat cheeses like part-skim mozzarella may actually work better than fuller-fat versions for pizza and baked pasta — they get extra stretchy and stringy instead of overly oozy.

Avoid Runny Ricotta

by in Food Network Magazine, March 12th, 2013

Three-Cheese Calzone

Hot Tips for Cooking With Cheese From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Ricotta is high in moisture, so when it’s baked on a crust (think calzones, pizza or savory pies), it can make the dough soggy. To prevent this, add a tablespoon or two of breadcrumbs to the ricotta filling, like Food Network Magazine did for these Three-Cheese Calzones (pictured above). The crumbs will absorb excess liquid from the cheese and keep the crust dry.

Improve Your Tofu

by in Food Network Magazine, February 21st, 2013

tofu

Hot Tips for Healthy Cooking From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Don’t overlook tofu because you think it’s bland. If you marinate it before cooking, it will turn out super flavorful. Slice firm tofu and drizzle it with your favorite marinade (try the orange juice-onion mixture in Food Network Magazine‘s Tofu Cuban Sandwiches With Jicama Sticks); soak for at least 5 minutes, then sear or bake.

(Photograph by Christopher Testani)

Boil a Better Egg

by in Food Network Magazine, February 14th, 2013

Boiled Egg
Hot Tips for Healthy Cooking From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Hard-boiled eggs are a great way to add protein to your diet. Despite the name, you should simmer — not boil — hard-boiled eggs. Put eggs in a saucepan, cover with water and bring to a boil, then remove from the heat and let stand 10 minutes. When they’re done, plunge them into ice water, then peel under running water. You’ll get eggs with creamy yolks, tender whites and a mild smell.

(Photograph by Levi Brown)

Make a Healthier Soup

by in Food Network Magazine, February 1st, 2013

Chicken and Quinoa SoupHot Tips for Healthy Cooking From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Sneak a little more fiber into your favorite soups: Use whole grains instead of white rice or noodles. We chose quinoa for the Chicken and Quinoa Soup in the January/February issue of Food Network Magazine because it cooks in just 15 minutes and adds a nice nutty flavor to the dish. You can also try quick-cooking barley, short-grain brown rice or whole-grain pasta in other brothy soups.

Boost Meals With Smoked Fish

by in Food Network Magazine, January 19th, 2013

Curried Rice With Smoked Trout

Hot Tips for Healthy Cooking From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Smoked fish is an easy way to add flavor, protein and healthy fats to a dish, and you only a little. We used just 1 ounce of fish per serving for the Curried Rice With Smoked Trout from the January/February issue of Food Network Magazine. Keep some smoked salmon or trout on hand (it stays fresh for about a week in the fridge) and try it on a sandwich or salad, or toss it with pasta.

Speed Up Caramelized Onions

by in Food Network Magazine, December 26th, 2012

French Onion Burger

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Caramelizing onions can take a while, but adding a big pinch of sugar will make them brown faster. The extra sugar caramelizes along with the onions’ natural sugars, helping the onions get brown in a hurry. We used this shortcut for the burger topping in Food Network Magazine‘s French Onion Burgers.

Trim Beans in a Flash

by in Food Network Magazine, December 18th, 2012

Green Beans
Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Green beans don’t need to be trimmed on both ends — just the stem end. For fast trimming, line up a handful of raw beans on a cutting board with the stem ends facing your knife, then push them into a line against the knife and make one long cut.

Preheat Your Roasting Pan

by in Food Network Magazine, December 11th, 2012

Roasted Carrots and Peas

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

To cut down on roasting time for dense vegetables like carrots and potatoes, preheat a metal baking sheet or roasting pan in the oven for at least 10 minutes. When the food hits the pan, it will get a blast of heat that jump-starts the cooking.

Finish Pasta in the Sauce

by in Food Network Magazine, December 4th, 2012

Pasta

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Drain your pasta when it’s just al dente, then cook it for a minute or 2 more in a skillet with the sauce. This lets the pasta absorb flavor from the sauce and it helps the sauce cling to the pasta. Try it with any simmered sauce (not pesto or carbonara), and if the sauce gets too thick, thin it with some of the pasta cooking water.

(Photograph by Christopher Testani)