Tag: hot tips

Buy Frozen Brown Rice

by in Food Network Magazine, June 4th, 2013

frozen brown riceHot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

One of our favorite new supermarket finds is frozen brown rice. It’s fully cooked and ready to use: You can add it straight from the freezer to soups, stews and stir-fries and saving about 45 minutes of cooking time.

(Photograph by Julia Cawley/Studio D)

Use Up Those Buns

by in Food Network Magazine, May 28th, 2013

pesto chicken burgersHot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Don’t let extra burger buns go to waste: Use them as a binder for chicken or veggie burgers, meatloaf or meatballs. For Food Network Magazine‘s Pesto Chicken Burgers (pictured above), we tore up a bun and mixed it with water to make a panade, a mixture of liquid and starch that holds ingredients together. Use this trick for any recipe that calls for breadcrumbs as a binder.

Improve Your Meatballs

by in Food Network Magazine, May 14th, 2013

Greek Meatball StewMeatballs are like burgers: The more you mess with the meat, the tougher they’ll be. Mix the ingredients with your hands until just combined — don’t overwork. And skip the browning; try poaching the meatballs in a broth or sauce, like we did in Food Network Magazine‘s Greek Meatball Stew. They’ll absorb the liquid and turn out extra tender.

Make Juicier Pork

by in Food Network Magazine, May 7th, 2013

Pork ChopsThin cuts of pork can dry out quickly, so try giving them a quick brine first. Pierce chops, cutlets or other thin cuts with a fork, then soak in heavily salted cold water for 15 to 30 minutes; drain and pat dry before cooking. You can add vinegar, sugar, herbs or other flavors to the brine, too. Just remember to go easy on the salt when you cook the meat.

Give it a try with this recipe: Pork Chops With Bean Salad (pictured above)

Know When to Salt

by in Food Network Magazine, May 3rd, 2013

Skillet Chicken and RavioliTiming is everything when you are salting vegetables. To get crisp, browned veggies like the mushrooms in Food Network Magazine‘s Skillet Chicken and Ravioli (pictured above), salt them at the end of cooking — after they’ve browned. To get soft, saucy vegetables like caramelized onions, add salt early on: It draws out moisture, which helps break them down.

Try a New Tomato

by in Food Network Magazine, April 24th, 2013

Greek Meatball StewThere are so many good choices in the canned tomato aisle now. We used fire-roasted tomatoes with green chiles to spice up the Greek Meatball Stew in the May issue of Food Network Magazine. Fire-roasted tomatoes also add a great smoky flavor to marinara sauce. Or buy canned cherry tomatoes and crush them in a saucepan for a slightly sweet, chunky pasta sauce.

Wrap Like a Pro

by in Food Network Magazine, April 17th, 2013

How to Wrap a Burrito, Step 1 How to Wrap a Burrito, Step 2 How to Wrap a Burrito, Step 3 How to Wrap a Burrito, Step 4

Next time you make burritos, try these construction tips.

1. Layer the fillings horizontally across the lower half of your tortilla (not the middle), starting with absorbent ingredients like rice. Put the cheese against something hot like meat or beans so it will melt.

2. Fold up the bottom of the tortilla and tuck it under the filling.

3. Fold in the two sides.

4. Tightly roll up the burrito.

(Photographs by Christopher Testani)

Design a Spread

by in Food Network Magazine, April 10th, 2013

Ham and Goat Cheese SandwichesCombine a soft cheese, like goat cheese or ricotta, with chopped nuts, seeds, dried fruit, grated garlic or a favorite condiment to make a quick sandwich spread. (Food Network Magazine mixed goat cheese with hot sauce and pepitas for the Ham and Goat Cheese Sandwich pictured above.) You can also use the spread on crostini, or dollop it onto hot pasta for a fun, fast dinner.

Improve Your Sauce

by in Food Network Magazine, April 3rd, 2013

SauceSwirl a few tablespoons of cold butter into a pan sauce before you serve it — you’ll be amazed by how it improves the texture. Cut the butter into small pieces and whisk them in a few at a time, then remove the sauce from the heat and cover to keep warm. If the sauce gets too hot, the butter can separate and make the sauce oily. If this happens, just whisk in a few tablespoons of water.

(Photograph by Christopher Testani)

Know Your Conversions

by in Food Network Magazine, March 26th, 2013

measuring cup

Hot Tips for Cooking With Cheese From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

When a recipe calls for grated cheese, you might not always know how big a block you should buy. The texture of the cheese makes all the difference, but as a general rule, 3 to 4 ounces whole yields 1 cup grated. To measure grated cheese, put it in a dry measuring cup and tap it against the counter; don’t pack it firmly.

(Photograph by Marko Metzinger/Studio D)