Tag: hot tips

Jazz Up Your Chops

by in Food Network Magazine, December 24th, 2013

braised pork chops with sageNext time you’re searing pork chops, heat a few sprigs of hearty herbs (like sage or rosemary) in the oil and cook the meat right on top of them. The herbs will subtly flavor the meat as it cooks. Check out these Braised Pork Chops with Sage (pictured above) from Food Network Magazine.

Lighten Creamy Dishes

by in Food Network Magazine, December 19th, 2013

evaporated milkEvaporated milk is a great substitute for heavy cream when you want to trim down a recipe: It’s 16 grams of fat and 120 calories lighter per 1/4 cup. Evaporated milk is thick and creamy and it doesn’t curdle when heated the way low-fat milk can. Try it in soup, mac and cheese, or creamed veggies, like in the Chile-Rubbed Steak with Creamed Corn recipe from Food Network Magazine.

(Photograph by Marko Metzinger/Studio D.)

Rethink Your Spices

by in Food Network Magazine, December 10th, 2013

Rethink Your SpicesSpices like cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg have been used for centuries in Mediterranean, Middle Eastern and Latin American cooking to bring out rich, meaty flavors in savory dishes. Try adding a pinch or two of your favorite baking spice to a rub for meat, or drop a cinnamon stick into simmering tomato sauce. Just remember: A little goes a long way.

Choose the Right Syrup

by in Food Network Magazine, November 19th, 2013

syrupDon’t be fooled by the label “Grade A” on a bottle of maple syrup: It’s no better than Grade B. Grade B syrup is darker and has a stronger maple flavor; Grade A is milder. We prefer Grade B for cooking (we used it in a Kale-Sesame Chicken Salad for Food Network Magazine). Both grades are more expensive than the imitation stuff (“pancake syrup”), but real maple syrup is worth the splurge.

(Photograph by Lara Robby/Studio D.)

Make Coffee Your Secret Ingredient

by in Food Network Magazine, November 12th, 2013

slow-cooker chiliBakers often use coffee in brownies and cakes to bring out the chocolate flavor. But coffee works just as well in savory recipes — especially slow-cooked dishes like Food Network Magazine‘s Slow-Cooker Chili. Try adding a shot to tomato sauce, gravy or stew, and if you don’t have brewed coffee, just dilute a little instant espresso.

How to Get a Better Chop

by in Food Network Magazine, November 5th, 2013

food processorWhen you’re chopping garlic, onion or other vegetables in a food processor, keep the motor running and drop the ingredients through the feed tube. The food will bounce around and won’t get stuck in the blade or along the edge of the bowl, so you’ll end up with nice, even pieces.

(Photograph by Ben Goldstein/Studio D.)

Why You Should Swap Chicken Breasts for Thighs

by in Food Network Magazine, October 29th, 2013

chicken-broccoli stir-fry

Next time you make a stir-fry, use chicken thighs instead of the usual breasts. Thighs are juicier and more flavorful, and because they have a little more fat (they’re dark meat), they don’t dry out as easily. Another bonus: Thighs usually cost less per pound.

Try It: Chicken-Broccoli Stir-Fry

Time Fish Perfectly

by in Food Network Magazine, October 8th, 2013

Thai Fish CurryMany recipes tell you to test fish for doneness with a fork: If it flakes easily, it’s ready. But sometimes that’s too late. Instead, watch the fish carefully and pull it from the heat just when it changes from translucent to opaque, or even a moment before, as we did for Food Network Magazine‘s Thai Fish Curry. The fish will continue cooking after you take it off the heat.

Switch Your Nutmeg

by in Food Network Magazine, October 1st, 2013

nutmeg
Ground spices lose flavor after about six months, but you probably won’t use a full jar of nutmeg that quickly. Buy whole nutmeg instead (it stays potent for two years) and grate just the amount you need each time. Use a fine grater and add the nutmeg sparingly — it will taste stronger than the pre-grated kind.

Pre-Crack Your Eggs

by in Food Network Magazine, September 24th, 2013

cracked egg

When frying eggs, crack them one at a time into a cup or small bowl — not directly into the pan. If the yolk breaks, you can save that egg for another dish. We pre-crack eggs for cookies and cakes, too, so we can pick out any bits of shell before they end up in the batter.