Tag: Grilling

Try a T-Bone Pork Chop

by in Food Network Magazine, August 9th, 2012

T-Bone Pork Chop

The T-bone pork chop is the perfect cut for grilling. Also called the “center cut” or “pork loin chop,” it’s immediately recognizable by the T-shaped bone running through it — much like the beefsteak of the same name. It’s mostly juicy loin meat, with a little bit of lean but tender tenderloin meat, and a nice amount of fat to impart lots of moisture and flavor. But the most important component is the bone itself, which does a lot to keep the chop from drying out as it cooks.

When you brine these chops, you end up with an even juicier cut. The chops in Food Network Magazine’s Grilled Pork Chops With Plum Ginger Chutney (pictured above) are brined in a mixture of water, sugar, salt, gin, vermouth and various spices. The botanical flavors of the booze really complement both the pork and the plum chutney. For your next barbecue, leave the boneless cuts at the store and try the T-bone instead. We promise you’ll be licking your chops.

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Take the Right Temperature

by in Food Network Magazine, August 4th, 2012

meat thermometerHot Tips from Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

To check a steak for doneness, insert a thermometer into the side, not the top. Aim the tip of the thermometer toward the center of the meat: You’ll get a more precise reading there than from the hotter areas near the surface. Move the steak to the edge of the grill before taking the temperature to prevent overcooking.

 

(Photograph by Antonis Achilleos)

Grilled Chicken 101 — Weekend Cookout

by in Recipes, August 4th, 2012


You’ve heard it before about this most beloved white meat: Grilled chicken can be boring. Sure, on its own, plain grilled chicken can be bland and dry, but it doesn’t have to — and should not be that way. To take everyday chicken to the next delicious level, try switching up cuts of chicken, experimenting with new cooking techniques and adding marinades, rubs and sauces to ensure moist, flavorful results. Follow Food Network’s three simple suggestions below to cook up crave-worthy chicken in a flash.

Buy a Better Bird:
Instead of reaching for boneless, skinless chicken breasts, give chicken thighs a chance instead. Dark meat is a tad fattier, so it’s inherently juicer and more flavorful. If you prefer lean white meat, however, look for bone-in chicken breasts — cooking chicken on the bone helps the meat maintain moisture.

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Grilled Pizza With Spicy Sausage — The New Girl

by in Recipes, August 1st, 2012

grilled pizza with spicy sausage
This grilling season, classic cookout fare is getting revamped. Think Bruschetta Dogs and grilled desserts. Don’t get me wrong, I’m still perfectly content with a good old burger. But with all the buzz around new foods that look great with char lines, I had to join in on the fun. Toss a pizza on the grill? I’m on it.

Pizza has become a go-to meal for my beau and me. It’s a no-fuss dinner that tends to be forgiving to newbies like us. Add too much cheese? No such thing. Trouble rolling the dough? Call it art. We’ve even taken off the training wheels and come up with our own topping combos and techniques, without relying on recipes. However, when the decision came down to grilling the pie for our next date night, I wanted the guidance of an expert. And who better than the grill master himself, Bobby Flay?

This Grilled Pizza With Hot Sausage, Grilled Peppers, Onions and Oregano Ricotta is a mouthful to say, and a mouthful to enjoy. Though it takes a hefty dose of prepping, don’t let that scare you away. It’s well worth the effort. Serve it on a night when you’re looking for a major ego boost, as each of its elements is sure to impress.

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Kebabs Your Way — Weekend Cookout

by in Recipes, July 28th, 2012


This summer, Food Network’s Grilling Central is packed with recipes for the entire family’s taste buds, boasting the best in burgers, dogs, chicken and more all season long. But with so many recipes, where do you start? Each Friday, FN Dish is giving you a complete menu that is stress-free, and this weekend’s spread features easy DIY kebabs.

Quick-cooking and a downright cinch to prepare, kebabs are one of the most versatile meals you can make on the grill. Most recipes consist of little more than meat or seafood, a variety of vegetables and a multipurpose marinade to flavor them. Beyond that, you can get as fancy as you like, customizing your kebabs to reflect your family’s tastes and whatever ingredients you have on hand.

If you’re cooking for kids, you may want to stick with simple Beef Kebabs With Couscous, coated in a mild Dijon mustard-rosemary mixture. Entertaining seafood lovers? Cook up Mackerel a la Plancha, layered with zesty lemon slices. Meat meat eaters will enjoy hearty Bacon-Beef skewers, while heat seekers will want to taste these Chili Molasses Chicken Skewers, marinated in a combination of Worcestershire sauce and chipotle peppers in adobo.

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Pairing entwine Red Wines

by in Drinks, Recipes, July 21st, 2012

filet mignon with mushrooms and entwine
This summer, Food Network’s Grilling Central is packed with recipes for the entire family’s taste buds, boasting the best in burgers, dogs, chicken and more all season long. But with so many recipes, where do you start? Each Friday, FN Dish is giving you a complete menu that is stress-free, and this weekend’s spread will be centered around entwine red wines.

Red wine often gets a bad rap in the summer. The thought has been that it’s too heavy and warming to enjoy with the traditionally light, dainty dishes of the season, like tender seafood and fresh salads. What’s been forgotten, however, are summer’s rich, full-flavored dishes, like burgers, pork chops, steaks, ribs and more, which naturally complement red wine’s tastes and textures. We’ve paired Food Network’s two entwine red wines — Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot — with our favorite hearty grilled recipes. Check out a few pairings below and read on for a weekend cookout menu to enjoy with them.

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Grill the Small Stuff

by in Food Network Magazine, July 17th, 2012

Grill Grate
Hot tips from Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Use a metal cooling rack to keep small or thin foods like shrimp and asparagus from falling through the grates. Just place the rack upside down on the grill so it lies flat, positioning it so the wires are perpendicular to the grates. The grill’s heat may discolor or weaken the rack over time, so use a sturdy one.

(Photograph by Ben Goldstein/Studio D.)

Fruit Cobbler 5 Ways

by in Recipes, July 14th, 2012


This summer, Food Network’s Grilling Central is packed with recipes for the entire family’s taste buds, boasting the best in burgers, dogs, chicken and more all season long. But with so many recipes, where do you start? Each Friday, FN Dish is giving you a complete menu that is stress-free, and the star of this weekend’s spread is a selection of sweet fruit cobblers.

Light, warm and oozing with fresh flavor, cobblers are like pie’s younger sibling — they boast a tender fruit center and buttery pastry topping, but they’re far quicker and easier to prepare, as they don’t depend on the rolling of finicky dough. In fact, most cobbler toppings are made by simply dropping a crumbly flour-butter mixture atop the filling. Though you can make cobblers with whatever fruit is your favorite, we’re particularly excited about summertime varieties that celebrate the best tastes of the season. Check out Food Network’s top five fruit cobblers below, each a winning addition to your weekend cookout menu.

5. Mixed Berry Cobbler – A bit of orange zest helps to brighten the flavors of the berries without adding an overly citrus taste.

4. Blueberry and Nectarine Cobbler – Food Network Kitchens mixes in a dash of instant tapioca to its filling to offset the juice of ripe berries and prevent a soggy dessert.

Get the top three recipes

Grilled Red Chile Buttermilk Chicken — The Weekender

by in Recipes, July 13th, 2012

grilled red chile buttermilk chicken
My mother hates barbecue sauce. She won’t touch it on ribs, chicken or burgers, and can’t bear even the faintest whiff of barbecue potato chips. Her dislike is actually a point of contention in my parents’ marriage, since my father adores the stuff and once even went so far as to invest in a friend’s sauce company.

Ever the peacemaker, I’ve spent my adulthood searching out ways to create tasty grilled chicken that makes my entire family happy (in recent years, I’ve also had to work my husband’s distaste for dark meat into the chicken equation). It has to be entirely unrelated to a traditional ‘cue sauce while still being flavorful enough to turn my dad’s head away from his beloved Mr. Brown’s.

To that end, I’ve made batches of yogurt-marinated chicken breasts, a mountain of teriyaki chicken legs and even whole birds bathed in olive oil, lemon juice and rosemary and cooked under a clean cast-iron skillet.

Always on the lookout for ways to keep our summer cookouts interesting, when I spotted Bobby Flay’s recipe for Red Chile Buttermilk Chicken, I had a feeling it would be another variation that could potentially please the hearts and minds of my many persnickety family members. He has you whisk a number of spices into four cups of buttermilk, pour it over a bunch of chicken pieces and then let it sit for a while in the fridge. Once on the grill, the chicken pieces are cooked indirectly until just cooked through. The finished chicken is intensely moist and tender, nicely flavorful and shockingly easy. Plan a cookout and make it your Weekender soon.

Before you marinate your chicken, read these tips

Fighting Summer Stains: Barbecue

by in How-to, July 10th, 2012

charcoal for barbecue
Quick: Name the messiest summer foods you can imagine. Did barbecue come to mind? Between their savory sauces and their often hand-held nature (drumsticks, ribs), grilled goodies can really do a number of your clothing. When it comes to barbecue stains, “Prevention is half the battle,” says Tre Mitchell Wright, expert at Whirlpool Institute of Fabric Science, who reminds us that even if you’re at a backyard barbecue, your pants are not a napkin. If you do end up with residual marks from either cooking or consuming barbecue, we’ve got you covered:

Charcoal
If you get charcoal dust on your clothing, always get rid of the charcoal residue while the stain is still dry. Do this by brushing it off or, in a situation where a whole bag of charcoal has exploded on you, you might even try using a vacuum. Tre says the next line of defense is to make a paste with a powder detergent and a little bit of water and apply it to the stain (a powder detergent is always a better bet for a particulate stain, which is a stain made up of tiny particles like charcoal). Work the paste into the stain and then launder the garment using the warmest water the garment can handle according to the care label. Check to make sure the stain has disappeared before drying.

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