Tag: Food Network Magazine

Lighten Creamy Dishes

by in Food Network Magazine, December 19th, 2013

evaporated milkEvaporated milk is a great substitute for heavy cream when you want to trim down a recipe: It’s 16 grams of fat and 120 calories lighter per 1/4 cup. Evaporated milk is thick and creamy and it doesn’t curdle when heated the way low-fat milk can. Try it in soup, mac and cheese, or creamed veggies, like in the Chile-Rubbed Steak with Creamed Corn recipe from Food Network Magazine.

(Photograph by Marko Metzinger/Studio D.)

Deck the Halls with Food Lights

by in Food Network Magazine, Holidays, December 17th, 2013

Deck the Halls with Food LightsTrade your traditional holiday lights for a fun food-themed strand. Go for a sweet look with gumdrop string lights ($30 for 25 feet; holidayprojectors.com) or peppermint candy lights ($20 for 11 feet; lightsforalloccasions.com). Or if your family hides a pickle ornament in the tree every year (a quirky tradition in which the kid who finds the pickle gets an extra present), change the game with a strand of pickle string lights ($8 for 11 feet; thewirelesscatalog.com).

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

Buy an Extra-High Apple Pie

by in Food Network Magazine, December 15th, 2013

apple pieWhen Food Network Magazine went looking for the best edible gift from every state for our 50 States, 50 Food Gifts story, we hit a snag in Missouri: We were torn between toasted ravioli, a St. Louis classic and this famous, cartoonishly tall Caramel Pecan Levee High Apple Pie from Kimmswick ($47, plus overnight shipping; theblueowl.com). The ravioli ended up in the story, but we think the 9-inch-tall pie deserves a shout-out this year: Twenty years ago, a flood almost destroyed Kimmswick, but volunteers built a levee to save the town. The pie is a nod to the high levee.  See the rest of the gifts here.

Rethink Your Spices

by in Food Network Magazine, December 10th, 2013

Rethink Your SpicesSpices like cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg have been used for centuries in Mediterranean, Middle Eastern and Latin American cooking to bring out rich, meaty flavors in savory dishes. Try adding a pinch or two of your favorite baking spice to a rub for meat, or drop a cinnamon stick into simmering tomato sauce. Just remember: A little goes a long way.

October’s Name This Dish Contest Winner

by in Food Network Magazine, December 4th, 2013

October 2013 Name This Dish Contest WinnerEach month, thousands of Food Network Magazine readers submit clever names for the back page’s Name This Dish contest. Previous dishes include coconut fried chicken (winning name: “Hawaii Fried-O“), a stacked salad (“Produce Stand“) and even fried ice cream (“Fryer and Ice“). In the October 2013 issue, we asked readers to dream up names for this steak sandwich (pictured above). Some of our favorites were:

The Steakholder
Jason Brink
Red Deer, Alberta

Philly Mignon
Katie Linn
Chicago

More favorites and the winner announced

Tour Michael Symon’s New York City Kitchen

by in Food Network Chef, Food Network Magazine, November 30th, 2013

michael symon kitchen

Check out Michael Symon’s New York City kitchen, then pick up some of his finds for your own kitchen.

kitchen satellite bowl

 

 

 

Keep reading

Hoppy Thanksgiving

by in Food Network Magazine, November 22nd, 2013

The Most-Purchased Thanksgiving ItemsPop quiz: What are the top-five grocery items sold during the week of Thanksgiving, excluding turkey? The obvious — milk, eggs and butter — are top-sellers year-round, including Thanksgiving week, but we were surprised that beer came in fifth across the country, beating out canned pumpkin and cranberry sauce. The fourth most popular item? That depends on which side of the country you’re on: East Coasters buy record amounts of cream cheese, while those in the West are big on packaged fried onions.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

20 Wines Under $20

by in Drinks, Food Network Magazine, November 20th, 2013

red and white wine

An all-American holiday calls for American wine. These bottles chosen by Food Network Magazine pair well with the feast — and they’re all from the U.S.!

Below are five of our favorite whites, click here to get the rest.

Get Food Network Magazine’s Picks

Choose the Right Syrup

by in Food Network Magazine, November 19th, 2013

syrupDon’t be fooled by the label “Grade A” on a bottle of maple syrup: It’s no better than Grade B. Grade B syrup is darker and has a stronger maple flavor; Grade A is milder. We prefer Grade B for cooking (we used it in a Kale-Sesame Chicken Salad for Food Network Magazine). Both grades are more expensive than the imitation stuff (“pancake syrup”), but real maple syrup is worth the splurge.

(Photograph by Lara Robby/Studio D.)

Dye Your Own Thanksgiving Napkins

by in Food Network Magazine, November 16th, 2013

Dye Your Own Thanksgiving NapkinsPick up an extra bag of cranberries this year and dye a set of napkins for Thanksgiving. Put white cotton napkins in a simmering pot of 8 cups water mixed with 1/2 cup salt for 1 hour (this will help seal the dye later). Meanwhile, simmer 2 cups each cranberries, cranberry juice and water for 30 minutes in another pot, mashing the cranberries; strain and return the liquid to the pot. Rinse the napkins in cold water, squeeze dry and leave one end in the cranberry liquid for 4 hours. Rinse again, squeeze and hang to dry.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

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