Tag: Food Network Magazine

Avoid Runny Ricotta

by in Food Network Magazine, March 12th, 2013

Three-Cheese Calzone

Hot Tips for Cooking With Cheese From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Ricotta is high in moisture, so when it’s baked on a crust (think calzones, pizza or savory pies), it can make the dough soggy. To prevent this, add a tablespoon or two of breadcrumbs to the ricotta filling, like Food Network Magazine did for these Three-Cheese Calzones (pictured above). The crumbs will absorb excess liquid from the cheese and keep the crust dry.

How to Use Homemade Ricotta

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, March 7th, 2013

Homemade Ricotta RecipeIn the March issue of Food Network Magazine, you’ll find my recipe for homemade ricotta. Traditionally, ricotta is made from the whey left over during scale cheese production, but at home it’s easy to make using fresh milk. In my version, I chose to add a little bit of heavy cream to the mixture to make it a little richer and more luxurious.

There are 101 ways to use ricotta, but when you are using homemade stuff, it’s best to do as little to it as possible. One of my favorite ways to eat it is in a simple sandwich inspired by one I love at Saltie, a Brooklyn sandwich shop:

Split a 5-inch square of focaccia through the middle and lightly toast it, then drizzle it with some good-quality olive oil. Mix about 1/3 cup of ricotta (preferably still warm) with about 2 tablespoons mixed chopped basil, tarragon and chives, a good grind of black pepper and a tiny bit of freshly grated lemon zest; spread it on 1 side of the bread. Melt a tablespoon of butter in a small nonstick skillet over medium-low heat, and add a lightly beaten egg and a pinch of salt to the pan; stir it constantly with a rubber spatula to make a very soft scrambled egg with small curds (it will take longer than you are used to). Scoop the egg onto the ricotta and top it with the other piece of bread.

Get Custom Cheese Slices

by in Food Network Magazine, March 5th, 2013

Havarti CheeseHot Tips for Cooking With Cheese From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Instead of buying presliced cheese in packages, hit the deli counter to find more interesting cheeses, like havarti, Gruyere or chipotle gouda, then have them freshly sliced. Ultra thin, machine-sliced cheese melts into a nice even layer. Plus, you can buy only as much as you need and specify the thickness.

30-Minute Four-Cheese Pasta — Most Popular Pin of the Week

by in Community, March 3rd, 2013

Four-Cheese Pasta With Peas and HamThere’s nothing wrong with using help from the deli counter and frozen food aisles to get dinner on the table quick — especially during the week. By utilizing deli ham and frozen peas to prepare this pasta dish, Food Network Magazine gets this week’s Most Popular Pin of the Week on the table fast.

For more everyday recipe inspiration, visit Food Network’s Let’s Cook: Recipe of the Day board on Pinterest.

Get the recipe: Four-Cheese Pasta With Peas and Ham

Crispy Business: How to Make Parmesan Crisps

by in Food Network Magazine, March 3rd, 2013

Parmesan crisps

Parmesan crisps (frico in Italian) look fancy, but they’re actually just cheese and crackers for the lazy. You get the crunch of a cracker plus big cheese flavor in one — and they’re super easy to make. Toss 1 1/2 cups freshly grated Parmesan with 1 tablespoon flour, then flavor with 1 to 2 teaspoons minced herbs, spices and/or citrus zest. Form the cheese mixture into 12 mounds (2 tablespoons each) and place them on a baking sheet lined with parchment and coated with cooking spray; then flatten into 4-inch rounds. Bake at 375 degrees F until golden, 8 to 10 minutes. While hot, gently remove them from the sheet with a thin spatula and let cool completely.

Clockwise from top left: Lemon zest, Pepper, Curry-coriander, Smoked paprika and Scallion

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

Improve Your Tofu

by in Food Network Magazine, February 21st, 2013

tofu

Hot Tips for Healthy Cooking From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Don’t overlook tofu because you think it’s bland. If you marinate it before cooking, it will turn out super flavorful. Slice firm tofu and drizzle it with your favorite marinade (try the orange juice-onion mixture in Food Network Magazine‘s Tofu Cuban Sandwiches With Jicama Sticks); soak for at least 5 minutes, then sear or bake.

(Photograph by Christopher Testani)

And Now, a Toast…

by in Entertaining, Food Network Magazine, February 16th, 2013

toasts

Have some fun at your next dinner party and serve a cheese course with toast shaped like goats, cows and sheep to match the milk each cheese was made from. Just butter slices of dense bread like rye, raisin walnut or pumpernickel, then cut out the animals (we found cutters at cookiecutter.com) and toast them in the oven. Spread the goat toast with Humboldt Fog, Bucheron or chevre, top the cows with Gruyere, Gouda or aged cheddar and top the sheep with manchego, Roquefort or pecorino toscano.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

Boil a Better Egg

by in Food Network Magazine, February 14th, 2013

Boiled Egg
Hot Tips for Healthy Cooking From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Hard-boiled eggs are a great way to add protein to your diet. Despite the name, you should simmer — not boil — hard-boiled eggs. Put eggs in a saucepan, cover with water and bring to a boil, then remove from the heat and let stand 10 minutes. When they’re done, plunge them into ice water, then peel under running water. You’ll get eggs with creamy yolks, tender whites and a mild smell.

(Photograph by Levi Brown)

December’s “Name This Dish” Contest Winner

by in Food Network Magazine, February 13th, 2013

Cheese Puff Tower

Each month, thousands of Food Network Magazine readers submit clever names for the back page’s Name This Dish contest. Previous dishes include a fall wrap (winning name: “Autumn Wrapsody”), a stuffed popover (“Puddin’ Pops”) and even a portable treat (“Berried Treasure”). In the December 2012 issue, we asked you to dream up names for this cheese puff tower (pictured above). Some of our favorites were:

Swiss Alpetizer
Maria Linebaugh
Marietta, Ga.

Cheese Puff Bluff
Cameron Wyman
Richardson, Texas

More favorites and the winner announced

United States of Cheese

by in Food Network Magazine, February 12th, 2013

United States Cheese BoardsPut out a state-themed cheese board. Then, plan a trip to see the cheesiest destinations in America.

Getting a new license plate can be a headache. Getting a license-plate cheese board, not so much. These fun state-themed beech-wood boards (pictured above) are etched with locally themed tag numbers, like BIG APL3 for New York and FRS SQZ for Florida. Eight states are up for grabs: California, New York, New Jersey, Texas, Massachusetts, Washington, Florida and Minnesota ($25 each, Talisman Designs; amazon.com).

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