Tag: Food Network Kitchens

Za’atar — The Next Best Thing You Never Ate

by in News, January 14th, 2014

Za'atar - The Next Best Thing You Never Ateby Jacob Schiffman

When I lived in Israel my junior year abroad in college, I started noticing that a lot of my favorite foods had a nutty, floral flavor I hadn’t seen before. I found out it was a Middle Eastern spice blend made of woody herbs (usually thyme and oregano, but traditionally hyssop), sumac and sesame seeds. There I saw it mostly on hummus or on flatbreads, but now I love putting it on roasted vegetables or fish (with a bit of honey), grilled chicken or baked eggs at breakfast. There are regional varieties of za’atar (Jordanian has more sumac and Israeli sometimes includes dill); I like the Israeli style, probably because that’s the first one I tried. Whichever one you prefer, let me know what you like to eat it on.

Find it: Look for it in most good grocery stores and any specialty spice shop.

What’s Next in Food Trends for 2014

by in News, December 30th, 2013


The editors, cooks and food-curious experts at Food Network Kitchens are always looking for what’s fun, delicious and next. It’s become a given that food fans, chefs and media types of all sorts look ahead and share their expectations. From their glimpse into the 2014 crystal ball, here’s a not-so-serious, definitely unscientific look at the food trends seen as up-and-coming.

“It’s kind of a wild time in food, full of contradictions,” says Katherine Alford, SVP of Culinary at Food Network. “On one hand people are more adventurous than ever. They’re eating Korean and Szechwan, seeking out crazy-hot ghost peppers, and mixing and matching to make outlandish hybrids of comfort foods. But that’s all balanced with a growing demand for food that matters more to our bodies’ well-being and the planet’s well-being, too.” Recently and still coming, you can see an eclectic mix of comfort food and healthy food, plus local picks as well as far-flung favorites. “In the past few years we’ve upped our spices, eaten more veggies and grown to expect some playfulness on the plate,” Alford says. “With all that, next year I’m keeping my eye on what’s cooking right here in America’s heartland. There is real excitement in the fresh voices cooking there. As for 2014, we hope what we found is inspiring with a little wishful thinking mixed in.” Tell us what you’re looking forward to as the next delicious food on your table in the new year.

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Kid-Inspired Chocolate Sugar Cookies

by in Holidays, Recipes, December 18th, 2013

Chocolate Sugar Cookies

Back in July when we hosted “take your kids to work day” in Food Network’s offices, our editors were already in planning mode for the holidays. For a fun activity with our group of 8- to 12-year-old visitors, we printed blown-up images of some of FoodNetwork.com’s top cookie recipes and asked the kids to vote for their favorites. Sugar cookies were the overall crowd favorite, but chocolatey cookies like Bobby’s Triple-Chocolate Cookies also ranked high for the kids. This prompted one young future food editor to comment: “You should have chocolate sugar cookies!” We loved the idea and promised we’d run with it.

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Shichimi Togarashi — The Next Best Thing You Never Ate

by in News, December 17th, 2013

Shichimi Togarashiby Susan Vu of Food Network Kitchens

I used to work in a Japanese restaurant and everyone there put shichimi togarashi (a Japanese mix of seven ingredients: two kinds each of chile flakes and sesame seeds, then orange zest, ginger, hemp seeds and seaweed) on everything — even french fries. It’s such a good, all-around condiment. My three favorite food components are heat, acid and crunch, and between the chiles, orange and sesame seeds, this seasoning touches upon all three of them. I put it on roast potatoes right when they come out of the oven, I love to toss blistered shishito peppers with it and a squeeze of lime juice, and it’s a great finisher for seafood too.

Look for shichimi togarashi at Japanese grocery stores or order it online.

WATCH: Make Macaroni and Cheese in a Rice Cooker

by in How-to, December 7th, 2013

Double-duty gadgets are a favorite on FN Dish, and rice cookers are just that. Newsflash: you can make more than rice in a rice cooker. Click play on the video above to watch Jonathan from Food Network Kitchens easily make the ultimate comfort food: macaroni and cheese.

What do you make in your rice cooker (besides rice)? Tell FN Dish in the comments below.

Photos: Food Network Kitchens Prepare for Thanksgiving Live

by in Shows, November 21st, 2013

Food Network KitchensMuch like you’re probably spending the week preparing for next Thursday’s Turkey Day feast, so too has Food Network Kitchens been pulling out all of the stops to get ready for the third-annual Thanksgiving Live, airing Saturday at 12pm EST. This year’s all-star bash will include returning stars Bobby, Giada and Alton, plus first-time Thanksgiving Live guest Ina. But before these Thanksgiving pros take over Food Network Kitchens to answer your questions, it’s up to the team in the kitchens to buy each and every ingredient needed for the chefs’ dishes — as well as to gather the utensils, pans and serving pieces needed to prepare them — and transform the test kitchens into a seasonal space worthy of a holiday celebration.

FN Dish headed to Food Network Kitchens to get the first look at the preparations going on behind the scenes, and what we found was no fewer than six knife blocks, dozens of pots and pans in every imaginable size and shape, and both wooden and plastic cutting boards, plus specialized tools to help Bobby, Giada, Alton and Ina prepare their dishes with ease. Check out these insider snapshots to take a peek inside Food Network Kitchens and find out what you can expect to see on TV come Saturday at 12pm EST.

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Choose the Right Syrup

by in Food Network Magazine, November 19th, 2013

syrupDon’t be fooled by the label “Grade A” on a bottle of maple syrup: It’s no better than Grade B. Grade B syrup is darker and has a stronger maple flavor; Grade A is milder. We prefer Grade B for cooking (we used it in a Kale-Sesame Chicken Salad for Food Network Magazine). Both grades are more expensive than the imitation stuff (“pancake syrup”), but real maple syrup is worth the splurge.

(Photograph by Lara Robby/Studio D.)

Make Coffee Your Secret Ingredient

by in Food Network Magazine, November 12th, 2013

slow-cooker chiliBakers often use coffee in brownies and cakes to bring out the chocolate flavor. But coffee works just as well in savory recipes — especially slow-cooked dishes like Food Network Magazine‘s Slow-Cooker Chili. Try adding a shot to tomato sauce, gravy or stew, and if you don’t have brewed coffee, just dilute a little instant espresso.

How to Make Wildly Inspired, Wicked-Good Waffles Out of Anything

by in How-to, November 8th, 2013

After wrapping up our waffle project, we in Food Network Kitchens kept thinking of new things we wanted to waffle. Let’s share the fun: You waffle some foods and share your hits and misses. Here are five tips that will help you through your waffling adventures:

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Food Network Kitchens’ Waffle Iron Hits and Misses

by in How-to, November 6th, 2013

Food Network Kitchens' Waffle Iron Hits and Missesby Heather Ramsdell and Rupa Bhattacharya

While we were working on the waffle project, we got really into waffling. We were waffling foods left and right to see what waffling’s magical crispifying effect improved (and what it didn’t). Here are some of their stories:

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