Tag: fix my dish

Convection vs. Conventional Ovens — Fix My Dish

by in How-to, September 25th, 2012

conventional oven
Twice a month we’re giving readers a chance to ask Food Network Kitchens’ advice about an issue they’re having with a dish. They can’t reformulate a recipe for you, but they’re happy to help improve it.

Question: My question is about convection ovens vs. conventional ovens. Do recipe bake times need to be altered in any way if the oven used is a conventional oven? I feel as though most recipes I try from experienced cooks are made in convection ovens and I wondered if it made a difference if my oven is conventional.  – K. Stroh

Find out the answer

Which Wines and Oils Do I Use When Cooking? — Fix My Dish

by in How-to, September 15th, 2012

red and white wine
Twice a month we’re giving readers a chance to ask Food Network Kitchens’ advice about an issue they’re having with a dish. They can’t reformulate a recipe for you, but they’re happy to help improve it.

Question: I’m just not wine-smart — I don’t know a dry wine from a non-dry one. It sure would be helpful if the chefs would say what kind of wine they’re using in a recipe, not brand specific, but if it’s a Chardonnay or a Merlot. And when they speak of using a finishing oil on their food, what does that mean? – Karen Shelton

Answer: Don’t stress about what kind of wine to cook with. It’s pretty straightforward: If it tastes good in the glass, it’ll taste good in the dish. As a basic rule of thumb, think white wines for delicate flavors like shellfish or most vegetables. Use red wines for robust flavors in red sauces and braised meats.

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What Can I Do With Unripened Fruit? — Fix My Dish

by in How-to, August 24th, 2012

unripened bananas
Twice a month, we’re giving readers a chance to ask Food Network Kitchens’ advice about an issue they’re having with a dish. They can’t reformulate a recipe for you, but they’re happy to help improve it.

Question: “Is there a way I can use fruit that is not quite ripe yet?” — Kathleen Sefchick Dixon from Facebook

Answer: If you can wait a day or two, many fruits (such as bananas, pears, peaches, kiwis, tomatoes and avocados) will ripen quickly when stored in a brown paper bag, and even faster if you add a ripe apple or banana to the bag.

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Keeping Blueberries From Sinking in Batter — Fix My Dish

by in How-to, August 10th, 2012

blueberry buckle
Twice a month, we’re giving readers a chance to ask Food Network Kitchens’ advice about an issue they’re having with a dish. They can’t reformulate a recipe for you, but they’re happy to help improve it.

Question: “How can I get my fresh blueberries to distribute evenly in my cake better so when they bake, they all don’t sink or rise, leaving nothing in the middle?” — Suzanne Sinatra Perucci via Facebook

Answer: Try tossing your berries with a tablespoon or two of flour before adding them to the batter. Just remember to account for that when you mix up your dry ingredients, subtracting that same tablespoon or two from the amount called for in the recipe. The light coating of flour around the berries will absorb some of the fruit’s liquid, making them less likely to sink. This is especially helpful when the batter is thin; thicker batters are a little better at cradling the fruit and keeping it suspended. You can try this with any of your add-ins — peach chunks, strawberries, chocolate chips, dried fruits or nuts — when the batter is thin. Even if it ends up not being necessary, it certainly won’t hurt the recipe.

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The Perfect Pizza Crust — Fix My Dish

by in Community, How-to, January 18th, 2012

pizza recipe
Twice a month, we’re giving readers a chance to ask Food Network Kitchens’ advice about an issue they’re having with a dish. They can’t reformulate a recipe for you, but they’re happy to help improve it.

Question: “How do I get my pizza crust to have that slightly chewy texture and hollow bubbles to obtain that authentic pizzeria-style crust?” — Stephanie.

Find out the answer to Stephanie’s question »

Storing Fruits and Vegetables — Fix My Dish

by in How-to, September 27th, 2011

storing fruits and vegetables
Twice a month, we’re giving readers a chance to ask Food Network Kitchens’ advice about an issue they’re having with a dish or a food item. They can’t re-formulate a recipe for you, but they’re happy to help improve it. This week’s question will help readers keep their produce longer.

Question: How can I keep fruits and veggies fresh until I use or cook them? I bought corn on the cob on Tuesday and by Friday, it had lost its moisture and taste. How do I extend the life of my produce? — Beth Patterson-Grinavic Kiessling

Find out the answer to Beth’s question »

Humidity and Cookies — Fix My Dish

by in How-to, August 8th, 2011

chocolate chip cookies
Twice a month, we’re giving readers a chance to ask Food Network Kitchens’ advice about an issue they’re having with a dish. They can’t reformulate a recipe for you, but they’re happy to help improve it. For example, this week’s question is directly related to the intense summer heat we’ve been having.

Question: “With all this humidity, my freshly-baked cookies got stale. How can I crisp them up again?” — Debby D.

Answer: Moisture may be good for your plants or your skin, but not for your cookies. Summer, though welcomed for the sun and fun, also brings humidity that makes your cookies limp — not so fun. Keep those cookies crisp by storing them in an airtight container. Some people toss a piece of bread in with the cookies to help absorb any excess moisture. You could also re-crisp them by baking on a wire rack in a 300 degree F oven for a few minutes.

Have a question for the Kitchens? Leave a comment below and they’ll answer a select number of them in the coming weeks.