Tag: fall produce

8 Underappreciated Fall Produce Items — and What to Do with Them

by in Recipes, October 3rd, 2015

When it comes to fall produce, pumpkins, apples and butternut squash tend to hog the spotlight. Although these in-season items deserve high praise, there’s a whole family of autumnal fruits and vegetables out there — most of which go largely unexplored. Expand your palate by swapping pears for apples in your next baking venture, or try substituting acorn squash for butternut squash if you’ve exhausted the latter. Most importantly, never let a tough husk or gnarled root intimidate you; juicy pomegranate seeds can be used to enhance everything from muffins to salads once you break through the firm outer shell, and hearty root vegetables produce out-of-this-world comfort food when used in casseroles and veggie mashes. Next time you’re looking for a break from pumpkin-spice-flavored foods or classic apple pie, turn to one of these underappreciated fall fruits or vegetables for a welcome change of pace.

Acorn Squash
We all know butternut squash as an icon of fall produce — but why not give acorn squash a try? When roasted, it takes on the same sweet, buttery quality as its more popular sister. Guy Fieri capitalizes on both the squash flesh and the seeds with this Roasted Acorn Squash with Mushrooms, Peppers and Goat Cheese (pictured at top), roasting them separately and then reuniting them in the finished dish.

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A Few Good Apples: 7 Apple Varieties and the Best Uses for Each

by in Recipes, September 30th, 2015

There’s no doubt about it: When it comes to fruit, Americans prefer apples — not just for their taste and versatility, but for their robust health benefits and year-round availability, too. A recent study found that apples account for 29 percent of the fruit consumed by U.S. kids daily. To keep up with the demand, growers have begun reviving long-gone heirloom varieties, and high-tech breeders are creating new strains for every taste — tart apples, sweet apples, apples that don’t brown after cutting. But a quick trip to the grocery store can easily turn into an ordeal when faced with the dozen or so varieties in rotation at any given time. While this is nothing compared with the tens of thousands of apple varieties available in the U.S. at one point, it’s still a lot when you consider how heavily modern agricultural practices have streamlined our choices.

As we enter prime apple season, it’s important to keep in mind that not all breeds are created equal. While some varieties were destined to star in your Thanksgiving apple pie, others are better suited for applesauce, salads or eating fresh out of hand. If you’ve been underwhelmed by previous attempts to cook or bake with apples, the problem may have nothing to do with your kitchen skills and everything to do with your choice of fruit. The following are just a sampling of the countless breeds you’ll find in markets every fall, with tips on the best uses for each variety.

As a general rule, Fujis are too juicy for baking, but they’re great for eating fresh. Use them to add a touch of sweetness in salads and slaws — or, slice them up and use them as a sweet-crisp complement to your fall cheese board, as Rachael Ray does in her recipe for Warm Brie with Fuji Apple, Pear and Melba Toasts. However, if gently simmered on the stovetop, Fujis can make a wonderfully sweet and supple topping for fresh baked goods, as you’ll find with Food Network Kitchen’s Souffle Pancake with Apple-Pear Compote (pictured at top).

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8 Apple Cider Cocktails to Try This Fall

by in Food Network Magazine, In Season, September 18th, 2015

apple cider drinks

If you’ve ever gone apple picking, you know that a hot cup of cider is the ultimate treat on a crisp fall day. But the unfiltered juice is too good to be limited to your orchard experiences. It’s equally delicious cold and makes an amazing home cocktail mixer. To get the party started, Food Network Magazine came up with eight fun recipes so you can begin toasting to fall. Get happy hour (and dessert) inspiration from the October issue below and start mixing.

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Fall Into Turnips — Fall Fest

by in In Season, October 10th, 2012

herbed leg of lamb with roasted turnips
fall festThough potatoes prove a year-round hit, their starchy cousin gets special attention once fall draws near and the sweaters are pulled on. As a member of the root veggie clan, turnips are a comforting alternative when whipped with butter, roasted in the oven or glazed stovetop.

If you’re a meat-and-potatoes kind of person, it’s about time you give meat and turnips a chance, too. Consider it the perfect side for a casual weeknight meal or a traditional Sunday dinner. No matter how you prepare this root vegetable, it’s sure to comfort you to your core.

As far as a meaty meal goes, any hearty cut will do alongside a heap of turnips. Try Food Network Magazine’s Slow-Cooker Ham With Turnips or Herbed Leg of Lamb With Roasted Turnips (pictured above) for a star-crossed combination. Whip up Bobby Flay’s Turkey Pot Pie With Sage Crust or Food Network Magazine’s Vegetable Shepherd’s Pie for one-pot wonders brimming with turnip goodness. In that same way, Michael Symon’s Chicken-and-Dumpling Soup recipe for Food Network Magazine ladles bits of turnip, rutabaga, fennel, celery, carrot and, of course, chicken and dumplings into each rejuvenating spoonful.

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Beyond the Veggie Tray: Cauliflower’s Starring Role — Meatless Monday

by in Recipes, October 8th, 2012

Spice-Roasted Cauliflower and Jerusalem ArtichokesNo longer confined to just meager veggie trays, cauliflower is a staple of fall produce that shines in bold, full-flavored dishes of the season. Since it’s a hearty, filling vegetable, it’s a go-to ingredient for those avoiding meat, as it can easily beef up salads, sides and main dishes alike. Think of cauliflower as the starting point to your dish and add other flavors and ingredients, like fragrant spices, fresh herbs, creamy cheeses and more, to take it to the next delicious level. Check out Food Network’s favorite three ways to enjoy cauliflower then tell us how you like to prepare it.

With just a handful of ingredients, Anne Burrell prepares Spice-Roasted Cauliflower and Jerusalem Artichokes (pictured above), a five-star side from Food Network Magazine with a crispy texture and warm flavors. She tosses the cauliflower and Jerusalem artichokes — root vegetables — with a mixture of cumin and cayenne pepper and slowly roasts them until they’re tender and golden brown. Just a scoop of these beauties will round out any fall-inspired meal.

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Stuff It With Spinach — Fall Fest

by in In Season, Recipes, October 3rd, 2012

pork chops stuffed with spinach
fall festLet’s talk spinach. It’s the green at the center of family dinner dramas and the barrier to many kids’ elusive desserts. More often than not, kids just don’t want to eat their spinach. And if we’re getting down to it, who can blame them? When spinach exits the freezer as a rock-hard rectangle and is defrosted into a soggy mess, who’s going to be down for a side of that?

Now that we’ve made it to October, things start to look up for spinach because each leaf is crisply in season.

We’re all about the classics like Hot Spinach Artichoke Dip. But sometimes you have to level with the little ones, the picky eaters and the greenaphobes sitting around your dinner table. Who knows, maybe incorporating spinach into their lives little by little could mean straight Creamed Spinach this time next year. When you want to savor this green — and satisfy the whole family — look to Food Network’s spinach-stuffed recipes to make everyone happy.

If a recipe asks for the frozen kind, go ahead and swap in the fresh stuff. This time of year there’s no need to defrost. Go for baby spinach to reduce stem clipping, too. That way, spinach can melt into your meals in the best way possible.

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Best 5 Butternut Squash Recipes

by in Recipes, September 27th, 2012

caramelized butternut squash
Butternut squash is a fall favorite. Try one of these top five recipes that are filled with classic autumn flavors from Food Network chefs.

5. Beef and Butternut Squash Stew – This stick-to-your-ribs stew is perfect for a chilly fall day. Lots of chunky vegetables, along with the beef, make it hearty enough for a one-pot meal. Serve with crusty bread alongside.

4. Roasted Butternut Squash Salad With Warm Cider Vinaigrette – For a salad full of fall flavors, serve roasted butternut squash on top of baby arugula with a few shavings of nutty Parmesan cheese.

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The Rise of the Kale Chip — Fall Fest

by in In Season, Recipes, September 26th, 2012

kale chips
Where were you the first time you ate a kale chip? Sitting on the couch watching reruns? Mingling at your foodie friend’s last dinner party? After a lifetime of guilt-inducing potato chip munching, there’s something pretty eye-opening about digging your fists into a bowl of solid kale chips. Salty, crispy and undeniably addictive, each one triggers that same sensation as the potato variety without the, well, bodily consequences.

Now that we’re inching into fall, each leaf of sturdy kale is in season and as pristine as ever. Use this to your advantage. As the weather gets colder and our food gets richer, going with the smart snack is probably a noble choice.

With just a drizzle of olive oil and a crack of sea salt, it’s easy to make homemade kale chips. Trust me, Food Network Magazine’s Kale Chips (pictured above) aren’t rocket science, but if you’re looking to get inventive, we’ve got just the thing for you.

Kale chips come in many forms, just like your favorite bag of potato chips. Accentuate the classically sea-salted with Guy Fieri’s Crispy Kale Chips With Lemon, which adds a shot of citrus and some crushed red pepper. Or churn up a Lemon Mayonnaise that serves as a perfect match for a dip-bound chip.

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