Tag: Fall Fest

Comforting Cauliflower — Fall Fest

by in In Season, November 7th, 2013

Roasted Cauliflower RisottoIt’s November, and for all we know, you’re already knee-deep in beef stew, spaghetti and meatballs, and chicken noodle soup. We get it. Fall means comfort: stews so tender the meat is falling off the bone and casseroles so cozy you get knocked into a nap at the last bite.

Here’s the thing: Comfort food doesn’t need to be synonymous with meat. Believe it or not, even the most unassuming veggies have the power to cure us of all our woes. Leave it to cauliflower — and these recipes — to bring you all kinds of comfort this season.

Stir a pot of risotto to sultry completion, this time with roasted cauliflower florets and sliced almonds adding that extra crunch. Food Network Magazine’s Roasted Cauliflower Risotto (pictured above) can work as a rich main dish, or as a smaller side.

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Eat Your Spinach Sides — Fall Fest

by in In Season, October 24th, 2013

Red Rice with Spinach - Fall FestFor some, the delicate leafy green means quiche, nourishing green smoothies and heaping salads. And for others — we’re lookin’ at you kids — it can be a hard sell, met with wrinkled noses and “No dessert until you eat your spinach!” tantrums. Today, FN Dish is coming up with spinach sides that, believe it or not, can make everyone happy. Cook it into your favorite recipes, saute it on its own, eat it nice and raw — you get the picture. When it wilts into its supple alter ego, all kinds of sides can come to be.

This season, grab baby or big-leaf spinach by the handful, for more reason than the ample health benefits. Whether you disguise spinach or make it the star of your dish, this recipe roundup will give you — and, hey, maybe even the kids — reason to love it.

For those who love the classic composition of Creamed Spinach, Sunny Anderson’s is decadent, creamy and works as a weeknight side or Thanksgiving star. Sandra Lee’s Parmesan Creamed Spinach adds a dose of sharp cheese, as well as a touch of pumpkin pie spice.

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10 New Ways to Devour Carrots — Fall Fest

by in In Season, October 17th, 2013

Angel Hair Pasta with a Walnut-Carrot SauceIf there’s any veggie taken for granted, it is undoubtedly the carrot. It’s not that we don’t eat ‘em. Please, we down carrots by the bagful — so often, in fact, that we might forget the veggie’s possibilities with all of our mindless munching. Here we go beyond the slick, shrunken realm of the baby carrot by zeroing in on bold preparations. These recipes take carrots by their roots, evolving snack time’s favorite veggie by rethinking the many, many forms it can take.

1. Shaved: For a fresh salad that leaves the leaves of lettuce behind, all you need is a vegetable peeler. Food Network Magazine’s Carrot-Cashew Salad shaves and transforms carrots into ribbons of ethereal crunchiness.

2. Pureed: Switch up your little tubs of packaged apple sauce for Tyler Florence’s Carrot, Mango and Apple Puree for Food Network Magazine. Just roast, puree and snack.

3. Pickled: Pickled Dill Carrots by Food Network Magazine inject the root veggies with zesty acidity, perfect for munching right out of the jar.

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Turnips Revisited — Fall Fest

by in In Season, October 10th, 2013

Crispy Turnip Gratin for Food Network's Fall FestPut down those potatoes, people. Here at FN Dish, we’re spending a little quality time with one of the most under-appreciated veggie around: the turnip. Odds are it’s not the star of your fall spread. Heck, maybe you’ve never even cooked this root vegetable before. Well, now that turnips are in season, they’re smaller, sweeter and bound to woo you.

More closely related to peppery arugula and radishes than beets or even potatoes, turnips come with loads of benefits. Not only do turnips add a quick zip to sides, mains and more, they’re also inexpensive, meaning you can load up on them at the store. Turnips are loaded with nutrients, especially if you hang on to the greens. Saute, roast, mash or blanch your turnips. Hey, you can even take ‘em raw in a salad.

Turnips are capable of making a statement on the table. Food Network Magazine’s Turnip Gratin with Almonds (pictured above) comes out of the oven bubbling and sprinkled with toasted breadcrumbs, while Herbed Leg of Lamb with Roasted Turnips gives turnips a celebratory edge.

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Cook Pumpkin from the Patch — Fall Fest

by in In Season, October 3rd, 2013

Baked Pumpkin Rice PuddingPull on your first sweater of the season and the craving for all things pumpkin spice immediately sets in. This traditional flavor hinges on seasonality, influencing our lattes, air fresheners and baked goods as soon as the air turns crisp. Though pumpkins from the patch may lead to stoop decoration, they never seem to reach the table. We use canned store-bought pumpkin year after year and pie after pie.

The canned option is convenient, often coming with spice and without the daunting task of dismembering a whole pumpkin. Though getting down to the flesh of a pumpkin — especially that of the smaller, sweeter sugar pumpkin — is a rewarding undertaking. This fall, do more with pumpkin than carving grinning jack-o’-lanterns. Slice it into chunks, use it for its seeds or transform it into a homemade Pumpkin Puree, like Alton’s. These recipes using fresh pumpkin are a great place to start.

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Early Morning Apples — Fall Fest

by in In Season, September 26th, 2013

Souffle Pancake with Apple Pear CompoteWhen apple crisp, apple crumble, apple pie and all things apple start flooding your recipe wish list, you don’t need to look at the calendar to know that fall is right where we want it. Apples are the stars of this coveted season — and rightfully so. We lug them by the bagful from the produce section and, sometimes, we even trek to the nearest farm to do the picking ourselves.

As the old adage goes — say it with me now — “an apple a day keeps the doctor away.” Instead of relegating apples to dessert, start strong by incorporating crisp, juicy apples into your breakfast regiment — or add them to the brunch table if you’re sleeping in. These apple recipes make any morning meal a celebration.
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Simple Brussels Sprouts Recipes — Fall Fest

by in In Season, December 19th, 2012

Roasted Garlic Brussels Sprouts by Food Network Magazine
fall festWhen it comes to in-season Brussels sprouts, simplicity is key. Your ingredient list should only be a few words and the preparation should be effortless from market to plate.

Here’s the most straightforward recipe of all: Food Network Magazine’s Roasted Brussels Sprouts. With just a gloss of extra-virgin olive oil and a shake of salt and pepper, halved sprouts come out crisp and tender.

Sauteed Brussels Sprouts by Food Network Magazine are shredded before hitting the pan with shallots, butter and a shot of cider vinegar. Roasted Garlic Brussels Sprouts (pictured above) are roasted in a piping hot oven, with brown sugar bringing a smooth sweetness and cilantro keeping things vibrant.

Slow-Cooked Brussels Sprouts feature a quaint roster of ingredients; after roasting stove-side low and slow, they’re caramelized to perfection. Alternatively, bacon, chicken broth and shallots merge together in Rachael Ray’s comforting Brussels Sprouts With Bacon.

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Six Broccoli Mains — Fall Fest

by in In Season, December 12th, 2012

Pasta With Roasted Broccoli and Almond-Tomato Sauce
fall festTo you, broccoli is a vegetable. To your kids — and antibroccoli peers — it’s nothing but a no-go. But let’s be real, are we surprised that so many broccoli aversions exist? When soggy steamed broccoli is the go-to move on many dinner tables, it’s a no-brainer. It takes more than a simple steaming for its true colors to come through. And now that it’s in season, you can get your serving of better-than-ever broccoli by bringing it into your main courses.

Food Network Magazine’s Chinese Beef With Broccoli, complete with oyster sauce and white rice, takes the takeout to your stovetop. Their Bacon and Broccoli Rice Bowl has a few twists, packing fresh cilantro, pickled jalapenos and, yes, bacon into an Asian-style dish.

For a Tupperware-bound lunch, cook up a cold Chicken, Broccoli and Cherry Tomato Fusilli. And, if we’re still talking pasta, check out Food Network Magazine’s Pasta With Roasted Broccoli and Almond-Tomato Sauce (pictured above).

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5 Light Squash Recipes — Fall Fest

by in In Season, December 5th, 2012

Slow-Cooker Squash Stew
fall festAfter the endless pies and casseroles of Thanksgiving, think about giving yourself a quasi cleanse before the holidays — all the while incorporating seasonal favorites. This week, we’re all about winter squash. And lucky for us, the winter squash category includes some of the most popular ones, like butternut, acorn and kabocha. It turns out that squash is low-cal on its own and these recipes don’t contain a trace of butter or cream.

Food Network Magazine’s Spiced Squash With Yogurt Dressing boasts spiced, roasted kabocha squash drizzled with a low-fat yogurt sauce and pomegranate seeds.

Slow cookers are a lifesaver when it comes to keeping things balanced without forsaking flavor. Food Network Magazine’s Slow-Cooker Squash Stew (pictured above) comprises butternut squash, chickpeas and Swiss chard. That sprinkle of Parmesan, however, is up to you.

For a fresh take on fall produce, look to Marcela Valladolid’s recipe for Food Network Magazine, Roasted Butternut Squash Salad With Tangerine-Rosemary Vinaigrette. In between bites of butternut squash come juicy tangerines, dried cranberries and spinach. Ina Garten’s Roasted Butternut Squash Salad With Warm Cider Vinaigrette blends apple cider and cider vinegar for a tangy contrast to squash roasted with maple syrup.

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10 Standout Cauliflower Recipes — Fall Fest

by in In Season, November 28th, 2012

Roasted Cauliflower With Dates and Pine Nuts
fall festCauliflower proves the perfect backdrop to all your favorite fall — or otherwise — flavors. What it lacks in color these snow-white florets make up for in versatility and texture. Do what you will with them: steam or roast, fry or purée. In the end, it’s an in-season veggie worth talking about.

This fall, make moves on some of Food Network’s best cauliflower recipes.

Like potatoes, cauliflower does well when cheese enters the mix. Try it out with Bobby Flay’s creamy Cauliflower-Goat Cheese Gratin, which comes laced with Monterey Jack and grated Parmesan as well. For a subtler sprinkle, make Giada De Laurentiis’ Roasted Cauliflower With Parmesan and Pancetta with an decidedly Italian influence.

For bold Middle Eastern sides that would go well with charred steaks or lamb chops, listen up. Claire Robinson’s Roasted Cauliflower With Dates and Pine Nuts recipe for Food Network Magazine (pictured above) works up a nice browning on the florets, and Anne Burrell’s Spice-Roasted Cauliflower and Jerusalem Artichokes recipe for Food Network Magazine brightens up any plate it hits.

For the calorie cutters among us, Food Network Magazine’s Cauliflower With Tomatoes is just the thing. This side breathes flavor with healthy additions like lemon juice, cilantro and loads of spices.

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