Tag: eggs

Egg Sandwiches with a Kid-Friendly Kick

by in Family, October 9th, 2013

Egg Sandwiches with a Kid-Friendly KickOur kids love eggs. We make hard-boiled eggs with bunny faces for breakfast and snacks all the time. But now we’ve moved on to a lunchtime classic: egg salad sandwiches. The kiddie update? Pickles. These sandwiches are simple: just eggs, real mayonnaise, a squirt of mustard and diced dill pickles. High-protein, easy to prepare and even easier on your wallet, these have become a lunchtime staple for the preschool set at our place. Try them with your kids this week.

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Sunny’s “Scrambled Eggs with Personality” — Meatless Monday

by in Recipes, September 30th, 2013

San Antonio MigasForget about the dry, tough scrambled eggs of breakfasts past. Sunny Anderson is introducing a new recipe that promises light, fluffy results full of flavor every time. Packed with crunchy tortilla strips, tender vegetables and pepper Jack cheese, her San Antonio Migas (pictured above) from Food Network Magazine are next-level eggs with Southwestern flair. “Migas are scrambled eggs with personality and texture,” Sunny recently told the magazine, which means they’re similar to the classic morning meal your family craves but dressed up with creative ingredients and textures.

The secret to making migas is layering flavors and incorporating them into whisked eggs before they’re scrambled. To start her 20-minute recipe, Sunny sautes tortilla strips until they’re buttery and crisp, then adds colorful bell peppers, green chiles and sweet onions. Together, the chips and vegetables will offer both crunchy and tender textures in the finished dish, while the eggs will be soft after just a few minutes of stirring. Be sure to lower the heat on the stove once you add the eggs to the pan, as too high a flame can dry them out quickly. Before serving, mix in chopped tomatoes, then top with creamy cheese for a fresh, bold finish.

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Pre-Crack Your Eggs

by in Food Network Magazine, September 24th, 2013

cracked egg

When frying eggs, crack them one at a time into a cup or small bowl — not directly into the pan. If the yolk breaks, you can save that egg for another dish. We pre-crack eggs for cookies and cakes, too, so we can pick out any bits of shell before they end up in the batter.

15-Minute Eggs Benedict — Most Popular Pin of the Week

by in Community, Holidays, June 9th, 2013

15-Minute Eggs BenedictIt’s not too soon to start preparing recipes for Dad’s big day next weekend. Start Father’s Day morning on an easy, yet satisfying note with Ree’s classic eggs Benedict, this week’s Most Popular Pin of the Week. Ree’s recipe features English muffins topped with Canadian bacon, poached eggs and a creamy sauce.

For more everyday recipe inspiration, visit Food Network’s Let’s Cook: Recipe of the Day board on Pinterest.

Get the recipe: Ree Drummond’s Eggs Benedict

Best 5 Deviled Egg Recipes

by in Entertaining, Recipes, April 11th, 2013

Traditional Southern Deviled EggsMuch is made of hard-boiled eggs immediately before and after Easter, but these two-toned beauties are a welcome party starter throughout the year. This weekend, whether you’re hosting an elegant spring dinner party or simply enjoying a casual night with friends, look to platters of deviled eggs to be the star appetizers of the evening. While they’ll curb pre-dinner munchies, deviled eggs aren’t so filling that they’ll weigh down appetites, plus they’re easily customizable with a myriad of ingredients, so you know you’ll find a style of egg that suits your tastes. Check out Food Network’s top-five deviled egg recipes below — all top-rated dishes that can be made quickly with ease — from Anne, Sunny, Melissa, Bobby Deen and Paula.

5. Truffled Deviled Eggs — Fresh truffles are extremely pricey, so Anne opts for truffle oil — an ingredient that’s a bit more modest — to add rich flavor to her top-rated eggs. But be sure to use only the amount listed, as truffle oil can easily overpower the dish.

4. Crunchy Deviled Eggs — After stuffing the egg whites with a tangy combination of lemon juice, mustard and pickled jalapenos, Sunny adorns each egg with canned fried onions for a crispy textured bite.

Get the top three recipes

An Egg-cellent Idea

by in Family, Recipes, April 5th, 2013

Broccolini With Hard-Boiled Eggs From Food Network MagazineI love perfectly cooked hard-boiled eggs. They need nothing more than a sprinkle of salt and make for a quick, protein-filled breakfast or snack. I’m guessing right about now we’re all trying to decide how to use up those eggs leftover from Easter celebrations, too — let’s face it, you’ve probably got at least a dozen in the fridge!

When life gives you too many hard-boiled eggs, it’s time to crack open some recipes for using them all up. Today I’m sharing one from my new cookbook, Homemade with Love: Simple Scratch Cooking from In Jennie’s Kitchen. It’s my take on the perfect tuna salad, and it has an extra tasty twist — a few sprigs of fresh mint. The mint brightens all the flavors and offers a refreshing burst with every bite that reminds me of a Vietnamese banh mi, which is where the inspiration to tuck a few leaves into my sandwich came from in the first place.

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10 Recipes for Leftover Easter Ham and Eggs

by in Recipes, April 1st, 2013

Lentil Soup with Peas and HamSo it’s the day after Easter and you look in your fridge to see half a baked ham and a bunch of hard-boiled eggs (maybe even colored ones) and you think: What am I going to do with all these holiday leftovers? Luckily Food Network has some great ideas for using them up, helping you take the rut out of leftover food.
But these aren’t your average hash and deviled egg recipes. Here you’ll find a hearty lentil soup with ham (pictured above), jambalaya with ham and eggs, salmon salad with crumbled hard-boiled eggs and even Scotch eggs. If you don’t know what that last one is, you’ll have to read on to find out.

Get all 10 leftover Easter ham and egg recipes

10 Ways to Color Easter Eggs With Household Items — Part Science Experiment, Part Fun

by in How-to, March 28th, 2013

Colored Easter eggs

Have onions at home, or maybe turmeric, a packet of Kool-Aid or Red Hots candies? If you do, then you’re in luck, because you are on your way to creating your own homemade dyes for coloring Easter eggs. You may look at the household items and think nothing of them, but with just some water, vinegar, and a little time, you can color eggs without buying the box of dyes from the supermarket. But the best part about the project is that it’s fun to do, especially when you get the kids involved — helping color the eggs only, of course. It’s part science experiment and part fun.

Find out how to color your own Easter eggs

How to Boil the Perfect Eggs

by in How-to, March 24th, 2013

eggsWith the approaching Easter holiday, you can expect to be boiling a lot of eggs, whether you’re coloring them with the kids or just boiling a batch to serve for brunch, lunch or the holiday dinner. But when it comes to boiling eggs, do you find you’re never quite sure when they’re done? Do you get soft-boiled when you wanted hard-boiled or vice versa? Do your yolks get that green ring (a sign they’ve been overcooked)? Food Network is here to help you in the egg department, making sure that boiling eggs is the least of your worries during the holiday — after all, there’s the whole family to contend with.

Find out how to boil the perfect eggs

Cookbooks for Good Eggs

by in Books, Holidays, March 18th, 2013

Cookbooks for Good EggsIs it possible to ascribe narcissism to a foodstuff? Do ingredients have egos? Is there vanity in a vegetable? The curious world of single-subject cookbooks suggests “yes!” Broccoli, did you really need an entire book? Hemp, wouldn’t a magazine feature have sufficed? Foods on sticks, where is your modesty?

Eggs are another story. There is no egotism in an egg book, not when you consider the crucial role eggs play in nearly every aspect of cooking, from breakfast to dinner, sweet to savory. Yes, eggs deserve a book — books! And books they’ve gotten. One online source lists 405 cookbooks on the subject.

At the Food Network Library, we keep a mere half dozen, but each is so wonderful in its own way that we just had to share. Here are four favorites from past and (recent) present: the best, the most-charming and the most-beautiful egg books from Food Network’s shelves.

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