Tag: Cutthroat Kitchen

“I Have to Eat This Stuff; Just Remember That” — Alton’s After-Show

by in Shows, April 5th, 2015

Canned whole chickens, vending-machine cheese, water-soaked hot dog rolls. Each of these items has been the focus of a Cutthroat Kitchen sabotage, and while they may be cringe-inducing (and downright hilarious) to fans watching at home, they’re nevertheless part of the offerings that the judges are forced to consume, as Simon Majumdar reminded us during the latest Alton’s After-Show.

“I have to eat this stuff; just remember that,” he told Alton Brown as he two looked back on a particularly doozy of a competition round on tonight’s all-new episode. The Round 3 challenge asked the chefs to make carrot cake in this spring-themed battle, and in the spirit of freshness and renewal in springtime, a sabotage forced one chef to “harvest ingredients new ingredients for their cake,” Alton explained. This involved digging through a makeshift garden for individually wrapped fixings, some classic like eggs and others not so traditional, like canned pickled carrots and cinnamon candies. “His sauce was odd, but now I know why,” Simon said of the offering from Chef Jeffrey, who was dealt this diabolical lot and called his dish Carrot Cake Surprise. “It’s Muggins here who gets to eat it,” he joked, adding of his own British sensibilities, “We never say something’s horrible. We go, ‘This is interesting’ or ‘This was a very brave choice.’ His was a very brave choice.”

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QUIZ: Are You a Cutthroat Kitchen Superfan?

by in Shows, March 30th, 2015

Antonia Lofaso and Alton BrownYou’ve watched the evilicious battles unfold on TV every Sunday night, you log on to FoodNetwork.com to check out the latest After-Shows with Alton Brown and the judges, you’ve even found out which sabotage would slay you if you saddled up for competition. By all accounts, you’re a bona fide fan of Cutthroat Kitchen. Now it’s time to learn once and for all whether you’re a superfan — the ultimate in die-hard devotion to all things diabolical. Take the quiz below to see how your knowledge of the sabotages, judges, host and contest rules stacks up.

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Begging a Sabotage to Work … and Failing: Testing the Cutthroat Kitchen Sabotages

by in Shows, March 29th, 2015

From inflated blueberry suits to curry-inspired balance beams and a swinging hammock in place of a prep station, Cutthroat Kitchen is known for its over-the-top sabotages and seemingly impossible challenges. But sometimes, eviliciousness is nearly taken one step too far, as the show’s culinary team demonstrated in the latest installment of Testing the Sabotages. Food style Abel Gonzalez tried his hand at a would-be challenge for a tortilla-soup round, in which one chef was to be forced to mix and prepare soup using only tostada shells. Luckily for that chef, Abel found that the task was ultimately impossible, so the chef was spared from struggling with — and ultimately crumbling under —the impossibility of that task.

Click the play button on the video above to get a behind-the-scenes look at Abel’s attempt. After adding the critical ingredient — a generous pour of broth, aka the hallmark of a soup — he pleaded with the shells, “Please hold, please hold,” as he set them in the microwave for a quick cook. Despite his earnest pleas, though, he opened the microwave door to a puddle of broth and disintegrated shells. “I don’t have a soup there; I have mush,” he admitted, before deeming this a “sabotage fail.”

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Cutthroat Kitchen’s Most-Evilicious Chefs to Return in All-New Tournament

by in Shows, March 24th, 2015

Cutthroat Kitchen: EviliciousAll Cutthroat Kitchen chefs are notoriously diabolical — with their penchant for mind games and ease in doling out doom. But every once in a while we see a contestant who isn’t just a wicked-good competitor but rather a contender on a whole new level of evil. In the all-new upcoming tournament, Cutthroat Kitchen: Evilicious, these especially fierce fighters will take their places in the Cutthroat arena for a second round of battles and, of course, all-new opportunities to sabotage.

On Sunday, April 19 at 10|9c, the first round of this five-part tournament will kick off with four returning chefs. The winner from that heat, plus the victors from the next three matchups, will come together in a nail-biting tournament finale on Sunday, May 17 at 10|9c, and ultimately only one competitor will earn the title of Evilicious Champion. Since all 16 of the competing chefs have battled before, they’re no strangers to the hilariously awful tests they’ll face in the name of sabotage. In fact, they relish in the chaos — especially when they’re responsible for creating it for others.

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QUIZ: Which Cutthroat Kitchen Sabotage Would Slay You?

by in Shows, March 23rd, 2015

Alton BrownIf you’ve ever found yourself watching Cutthroat Kitchen on the couch at home and thinking you have the chops to survive Alton Brown‘s diabolical sabotages, we have news for you: You might not be diabolical enough to handle the heat of the Cutthroat arena. After all, it takes an especially evilicious lot to stand up to challenges like the now-infamous mini kitchen or a mandate to dress up in a themed suit (remember that Thanksgiving turkey getup?). Take the quiz below to find out which of Alton’s wonderfully wicked sabotages would ultimately slay you in the midst of the battle for Cutthroat glory.

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Facepalm: “A Hollandaise Crumble” — Alton’s After-Show

by in Shows, March 22nd, 2015

From the wonderfully weird to the disturbing and downright diabolical, Cutthroat Kitchen judges have seen nearly everything in the seven seasons of evilicious competition. But something in tonight’s all-new battle forced longtime judge Simon Majumdar to simply cover his eyes in disbelief as he recounted the horror during Alton’s After-Show.

The Round 1 challenge — eggs Benedict — may have started simply enough, but after a few required cooking implements were put in place, the situation turned grisly as Chef Trevor was forced to use a conveyor toaster to prepare his plate. “He actually made … a serviceable hollandaise, but he decided at the last minute to put it on a plate and keep it warm in the top of that,” Alton Brown told Simon. “And in the time that he did that, it went from sauce to scrambled egg. It because a hollandaise crumble.” While Simon had no choice but to rest his head in his hands as he looked back on that doomed dish, fans were reminded of what Simon said after tasting Chef Trevor’s offering: “I never need to eat another hollandaise crumble as long as I live.” Nevertheless, though, Chef Trevor managed to survive the round, as Simon explained that another rival, Chef Monterey, presented a poor egg, which was ultimately unforgivable.

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“This Is Better Than a Regular Tuna Melt” — Testing the Cutthroat Kitchen Sabotages

by in Shows, March 15th, 2015

Though it just so happens that many sabotages lead Cutthroat Kitchen chefs to turn out inferior dishes, thanks to the oddball ingredients and haphazard tools, each challenge is — believe it or not — designed to ensure that the competitors have what they need to succeed. That’s where Testing the Sabotages comes in; before a sabotage is sold at auction, the Cutthroat Kitchen culinary crew must attempt it behind the scenes to ensure that it is indeed fair for contestants.

In the latest test, on a spicy-tuna sushi swap-out during a tuna melt challenge, it turned out that this challenge not only allowed for a successful tuna melt, but ultimately set the scene for creating a sandwich far superior to the original. Food stylist Hugo Sanchez hollowed out sushi rolls to excavate the seafood inside, and after he combined the fish with a bit of mayo, plus fresh green and purple onions, and then mounded the mixture with cheese between slices of bread, the resulting dish turned out “better than a regular tuna melt,” he proclaimed. “It’s got a little spice, which I normally wouldn’t have added.”

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Alton and Antonia at the Stove for Omelets 101 — Alton’s After-Show

by in Shows, March 8th, 2015

Omelets may seem easy enough to make — after all, it takes just one, maybe two, ingredients to prepare them. But as judge Antonia Lofaso explained to Alton Brown on the host’s all-new Alton’s After-Show tonight, “maybe people don’t actually know what an actual omelet is,” as several Cutthroat Kitchen competitors presented her with scrambles instead. Ever the master of Good Eats, Alton took this opportunity to demonstrate the ins and outs of proper omelet technique, and along with Antonia, he dished out a quality omelet offering. Read on below for their top 10 tips to mastering winning omelets every time, then click the play button on the video above to watch their culinary lesson unfold.

1. “I like three eggs for an 8-inch pan,” Alton told Antonia, who agreed that’s an ideal amount.

2. It’s best to start with room-temperature eggs so it doesn’t take them as long to warm up, noted Alton.

3. “I don’t want to add my salt too early,” Antonia explained as she whisked her eggs. “I want to get a fluff first.” She told Alton that salt could actually start the cooking process of the egg and thus change its color, so it’s best to wait until just before cooking to stir in salt.

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The Curse of the Deconstructed Dish — Alton’s After-Show

by in Shows, March 1st, 2015

No matter chefs’ culinary skill levels or the amount of time they’ve prepared for competition, nothing can ready them for battle on Cutthroat Kitchen. Combined with the fierce time constraints in any given round, the unruly sabotages doled upon them practically guarantee they must reimagine any preconceived ideas about their dish and simply attempt to finish on time. For many finalists, however, the only way to complete the round is to offer a deconstructed version of their dish, featuring just its parts, which when combined, may make up a whole.

Such a maneuver is risky, as judges — especially seasoned ones like Antonia Lofaso, Jet Tila and Simon Majumdar — can see past a chef’s mention of purposely deconstructing a dish and realize that it’s likely a last-ditch effort to plate his or her food. On tonight’s all-new episode, Chef Jenny was faced with a doozy of a sabotage that landed her in a racecar seat, so her ability to cook quickly was compromised. And much to the judge’s horror, Chef Jenny told Antonia that her lasagna was “deconstructed.” Antonia explained of her reaction to Alton Brown on the host’s After-Show, “I almost can’t take it seriously when they say ‘deconstructed’ to me anymore.” Alton added, “Because nobody actually does it unless they’re in trouble.” Antonia said of Chef Jenny sarcastically, “She’s like, ‘Oh, I really meant to just throw the noodle down the center and put some raw tomato on it with a dollop of ricotta.'” Ultimately the curse of the deconstructed dish struck again: Chef Jenny said goodbye after the lasagna round.

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A Transformative Potato Chip Experience — Testing the Cutthroat Kitchen Sabotages

by in Shows, February 22nd, 2015

A competition like Cutthroat Kitchen can surely be a transformative undertaking for the chef contestants, as they’re almost always pushed beyond their culinary comfort zones. But their ingredients, too, are often forced to become something they’re usually not in order to satisfy a challenge — that’s where Testing the Sabotages comes in. Before Alton Brown could auction off a test to, say, turn potato chip crumbs into gnocchi, as he did on tonight’s all-new episode, the Cutthroat culinary crew had to attempt the conversion firsthand to make sure it was both possible and fair within the time limits.

Just minutes into starting his test, food stylist Hugo Sanchez struggled to work with the gnocchi dough, and he admitted, “The chips in it are preventing it from binding as a normal dough would. It’s actually turning out to be a bigger deal than I expected.” Nevertheless, he soon managed to roll the dough into a log and lob off bite-size dumplings, and in the spirit of evilicious cooking, he said, “It may not taste like gnocchi, but it’s going to look like gnocchi.” Sure enough, after a quick boil and pan-fry, he served up a simple yet presentable gnocchi offering, though he wondered if chefs could use their imagination to create an even better rendition. “It’s definitely something you can play with,” Hugo noted. “Maybe some bacon, some sour cream — call it a baked potato gnocchi.”

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