Tag: cheese

Crispy Business: How to Make Parmesan Crisps

by in Food Network Magazine, March 3rd, 2013

Parmesan crisps

Parmesan crisps (frico in Italian) look fancy, but they’re actually just cheese and crackers for the lazy. You get the crunch of a cracker plus big cheese flavor in one — and they’re super easy to make. Toss 1 1/2 cups freshly grated Parmesan with 1 tablespoon flour, then flavor with 1 to 2 teaspoons minced herbs, spices and/or citrus zest. Form the cheese mixture into 12 mounds (2 tablespoons each) and place them on a baking sheet lined with parchment and coated with cooking spray; then flatten into 4-inch rounds. Bake at 375 degrees F until golden, 8 to 10 minutes. While hot, gently remove them from the sheet with a thin spatula and let cool completely.

Clockwise from top left: Lemon zest, Pepper, Curry-coriander, Smoked paprika and Scallion

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

And Now, a Toast…

by in Entertaining, Food Network Magazine, February 16th, 2013

toasts

Have some fun at your next dinner party and serve a cheese course with toast shaped like goats, cows and sheep to match the milk each cheese was made from. Just butter slices of dense bread like rye, raisin walnut or pumpernickel, then cut out the animals (we found cutters at cookiecutter.com) and toast them in the oven. Spread the goat toast with Humboldt Fog, Bucheron or chevre, top the cows with Gruyere, Gouda or aged cheddar and top the sheep with manchego, Roquefort or pecorino toscano.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

United States of Cheese

by in Food Network Magazine, February 12th, 2013

United States Cheese BoardsPut out a state-themed cheese board. Then, plan a trip to see the cheesiest destinations in America.

Getting a new license plate can be a headache. Getting a license-plate cheese board, not so much. These fun state-themed beech-wood boards (pictured above) are etched with locally themed tag numbers, like BIG APL3 for New York and FRS SQZ for Florida. Eight states are up for grabs: California, New York, New Jersey, Texas, Massachusetts, Washington, Florida and Minnesota ($25 each, Talisman Designs; amazon.com).

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Ricotta Cheese — Off the Beaten Aisle

by in How-to, April 3rd, 2012

ricotta crab bites
When it comes to food, “recooked” isn’t generally a term met with much affection. The dairy world, however, gives us a fine exception in ricotta cheese.

Ricotta — Italian for recooked — isn’t exactly a stranger to most Americans, who tend to love it in their lasagna and stuffed pasta shells.

But as cheeses go, its versatility is vastly underappreciated, mostly because few people realize how it’s made, or why that matters for how they use it.

So let’s start there. Ricotta got its name because it is made literally by recooking the liquid left over from making other cheese, often mozzarella. This is possible because when the mozzarella or other cheese is made, most but not all of the protein is removed from the liquid, usually cow’s milk.

That leftover protein can be recooked and coagulated using a different, acid-based process (a rennet-based method is used to make the first batch of cheese). The result is a soft, granular cheese with a texture somewhere between yogurt and cottage cheese. The taste is mild, milky, salty and slightly acidic.

Get the recipe for Ricotta-Crab Bites

Tips for the Perfect Fondue

by in Food Network Magazine, January 17th, 2012

Perfect Fondue

Food Network Magazine has the recipe and tips for the Perfect Fondue. Here’s how to master the melting:

1. Use room-temperature cheese: Grate the cheese straight out of the fridge, then let it come to room temperature before melting.

2. Keep the heat low: Overcooked cheese is tough and rubbery. Melt it slowly, stir constantly and don’t let it come to a boil.

Melt the cheese on the stove and more tips »

Fun With Fondue

by in Recipes, October 28th, 2011

Who says you can’t play with your food? Fondue is a warm bath of melted cheese, chocolate or blended fruit puree just waiting for you to dunk something into it. Best served with cubes of bread or freshly chopped fruits or vegetables, fondue can be made in a classic fondue warming pot or on the stove and later plated. Our savory and sweet fondue recipes below are quick-to-prepare snacks or light meals, so grab a fondue fork and start dipping.

Food Network Magazine’s traditional Fondue (pictured above) is made with gooey-good Gruyere cheese, crisp white wine and a healthy splash of cognac. Serve along with slices of tart green apples to balance the richly flavored cheese.

More fondue recipes »

Halloumi — Off the Beaten Aisle

by in How-to, Recipes, September 15th, 2011

grilled cheese salad
You’ll probably feel pretty stupid calling it “squeaky cheese,” but as soon as you take a bite you’ll understand why it makes sense.

Sometimes called Greek grilling cheese, halloumi is just that — a dense cheese that holds its shape and won’t drip through the grates when grilled.

And when you chew it? It makes a squeaky sound against your teeth.

Luckily, mouth noises aren’t the real selling point of this cheese. Taste and versatility are what will drive you to find this relative of feta cheese.

Traditionally made from sheep’s milk on the island of Cyprus, halloumi today often is made from a blend of milk from of sheep, goats and cows.

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Snowman Cheese Ball

by in Holidays, View All Posts, December 24th, 2010
Frosty the Cheese Ball

‘Tis the season for last-minute appetizers. Here’s one to be merry about; it’s easy, cheesy and doubles as table decor. It’s a cheese ball . . . snowman. Learn how you can make one in minutes. Read more

“Real” Mac and Cheese

by in View All Posts, March 4th, 2009

On a recent snowy evening, the Croque Monsieur Mac and Cheese recipe from our Cheese Guide beckoned. Okay, confession time: My normal mac and cheese comes in a box with a packet of powdered cheese. But this recipe is the real deal – you make a creamy béchamel sauce, fold in two cheeses and the pasta, and then bake until it’s hot and bubbly. It’s deceptively simple and it tastes amazing!

So what the heck is a “Croque Monsieur?” I had to look it up. It’s a French ham and cheese sandwich that’s either toasted or dipped in egg and sautéed in butter. This mac and cheese is a playful twist, using the traditional Gruyere cheese and sliced ham. And, for my favorite part, a bread and egg mixture forms a savory bread-pudding-like crust over the top.

For a more calorie-conscious version of Mac and Cheese, check out Ellie’s made-over recipe, part of our Monthly Meal Makeover features. You can also find tips for slimming down this classic dish from HealthyEats.com. Or you can just do what I did: Serve the ooey-gooey full-fat version with a side salad.

- Kirsten, Web Editor

GUAC OFF 2009 — Winners

by in View All Posts, January 28th, 2009


The Food Network staff Guac Off ’09 stretched across two states and in the end, two were left standing. Without further fanfare, we want to announce our two winners and share some photos.
Get the results here.